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A

  • A [Blackjack] Short for an Ace.
  • A Ballerina Special [Craps] Betting that the next roll will be the total sum of 4 (2&2).
  • A Cheval [Roulette] French for the Split Bet
  • A Compass [Sailing] The act of checking compass readings against known headings in order to determine the compass error.
  • A Duck and a Flea [Bingo] 23
  • A Flea in Heaven [Bingo] 37
  • A Hobos Delight on a Cold and Rainy Night [Craps] Boxcars: 12
  • A Spin [Roulette] One game. Can be while the ball is still in action, a current result or a recorded result.
  • A Square Pair [Craps] Betting that the next roll will be the total sum of 8 (4&4)
  • A-Frame [Motor Sports] Either upper or lower connecting suspension piece (in the shape of an A) locking the frame to the spindle.
  • A-Game [Poker] 1) The highest-stakes game in a given establishment. Opposite of Z-game. 2) One's best game, in terms of the quality of one's play, as, "He's playing his A-game."
  • A-Pillar [Motor Sports] Vertical roof support between the windshield and front edge of the front side window.
  • A-Post [Motor Sports] The post extending from the roof line to the base of the windshield on either side of the car.
  • A.P.S.I. [Skiing] Australian Professional Ski Instructors Inc., the body that trains and certifies Alpine ski instructors in Australia.
  • A.S.F. [Skiing] The Australian Ski Federation, now Ski Australia.
  • Aaa [Motor Sports] American Automobile Association. This is the large nationwide car club that offers services such as travel assistance, roadside service, etc. It is not widely known now, but the AAA was once the organization that sanctioned most of the "legitimate" racing in the United States; its Contest Board sanctioned the Indy 500 and all Indy car racing in the U.S. until 1955 (when the Contest Board was disbanded). AAA is no longer involved in racing, but actions that it took in the '40s and '50s led indirectly to the formation and growth of NASCAR and USAC, and the ramifications of those actions are still with us today.
  • Aaaa [General] Asian Amateur Athletics Association.
  • Aad [Skydiving] Automatic activation device. It opens the reserve automatically if a predetermined altitude is passed at a high rate of speed. Commonly referred to by the brand name Cypres. Previously only students used AAD-devices, but today even the more experienced skydivers and even the skygods are starting to accept the idea of getting their bacon saved by one.
  • Aakf [General] Asian Amateur Kabaddi Foundation.
  • Aara [Motor Sports] The American Auto Racing Association, located in Spokane, Washington.
  • Aasf [General] Asian Ameteur Swimming Federation.
  • Ab [Baseball] At-Bats
  • Ab/Gidp [Baseball] At-Bats per Grounded Into Double Play
  • Ab/Hr [Baseball] At-Bats per Home Run
  • Ab/Rbi [Baseball] At-Bats per Runs Batted In
  • Aba [General] Asian Boxing Association.
  • Aback [Sailing] Wind on the wrong side of the sails.
  • Abaft [Sailing] Toward the rear of the boat, behind the boat.
  • Abandoned [Greyhound Racing] A race meeting which has been cancelled because a club did not receive sufficient nominations to be able to stage it, or because of inclement weather which made racing on the track unsafe. A race meeting may also be abandoned part way through because of inclement weather. All bets placed on abandoned races are fully refunded.
  • Abaniko [Martial Arts] Arnis striking technique using a stick and resembling a fan motion.
  • Abaxial (Fracture) [Horse Racing] See sesamoids.
  • Abeam [Sailing] At a right angle to the length of the boat.
  • Able [Poker] An obsolete term for the player immediately to the left of the dealer in games that use an automatic betting scheme. Also called edge, elder hand, or eldest hand. Sometimes the player in that position is the last to bet before the draw, which is equivalent to the situation involving an under-the-gun blind.
  • Abrade [Golf] The process of removing the chrome finish from a steel shaft or the layer of paint from a graphite shaft prior to installation of the shaft into the head. Abrading may be done through the use of a sandpaper, a belt sander, a file, a knife, etc.
  • Abreast [Sailing] Off the side, even with the boat.
  • Absence of Blade [Fencing] The situation in which the fencer's blades are not in contact. The opposite of engagement.
  • Absolute Title [Motor Sports] A document that states a person or a legal entity has the right of ownership.
  • Absorption/Extension [Freestyle Skating] The technique of absorbing the front side of a mogul with the knees, then extending and driving the hips forward over the backside of the mogul.
  • Ac [Blackjack] [1] Acronym for Atlantic City, NJ, the city [2] Acronym for Anthony Curtis, author and publisher.
  • Academics [Baseball] The Notre Dame baseball squad posted a 3.19 team grade-point average in the 2000 fall semester-the program's best semester in the seven-year tenure of head coach Paul Mainieri. Nine players turned in a Dean's List semester (3.4 or higher) in the fall of 2000, with 21 at 3.0 or higher. Irish baseball players have earned GTE Academic All-America honors 13 times since 1982, including a pair in 2000: 2B Jeff Perconte (3.76 cumulative GPA, double major in economics and government, now attending Notre Dame Law School) and current senior LHP Mike Naumann (3.92, pre-professional science, three 4.0 semesters, already accepted into and plans to attend Baylor Medical School). Notre Dame was one of seven Division I baseball teams with multiple Academic All-Americans in 2000 and only two of those schools-Notre Dame and North Carolina-participated in the 2000 NCAAs. Top All-America candidates for 2001 include Naumann, junior 3B Andrew Bushey (3.33, finance) and sophomore RF Brian Stavisky (3.69, Mendoza College of Business).
  • Acb [General] Australian Cricket Board.
  • Acc [General] Asian Cricket Council.
  • Acceptor [Greyhound Racing] A runner officially listed to start in a race.
  • Accident [Motor Sports] An unforeseen and unintended event or occurrence.
  • Accidental Jibe [Sailing] An accidental jibe happens when the boat is steered or the wind shifts such that the stern of the boat accidentally passes through the eye of the wind. This causes that main boom to swing violently to the other side of the boat. Without proper preparation when jibing, the force of the boom's motion can be destructive, injuring the crew and damaging equipment. In strong winds and on large boats this force can dismast the boat and seriously injure crew members hit by the boom. Sometimes a preventer is used to reduce the possibility of an accidental jibe.
  • Accidentally Offside [Rugby] A player is accidentally offside if he cannot avoid contact with an opponent while being offside. A scrummage is formed at the place where his team last played the ball.
  • According to Hoyle [Poker] With respect to the rules of poker, proper; a vague phrase invoking authority.
  • Account Card [Keno] A plastic card that enables access to an account used for the purpose of placing bets.
  • Accountant [Figure Skating] The official who compiles scores from judges and computes placements.
  • Accumulator [General] A bet in which a single stake is used to generate two or more bets in succession. The punter makes a series of selections each from a different race or event. Every time a selection wins, the stake plus winnings is put onto the next selection. If any selection loses, the whole bet is a loser. (Accumulators are also known as doubles, trebles, fourfolds, fivefolds, sixfolds, etc., depending on the number of selections.)
  • Accus [Motor Sports] Automotive Competition Committee of the United States. This is an umbrella organization which includes representatives from CART, NASCAR, IMSA, SCCA, NHRA, USAC, and as of November 1997, the IRL. It handles cross-licensing between sanctioning bodies in the U.S., and serves as the U.S. representative to FISA, the international auto racing coordination body. The formation of ACCUS in 1961 eliminated most of the turf wars between rival sanctioning bodies; doing so contributed greatly to the growth of auto racing in the U.S. during the '60s
  • Accw [Wrestling] Atlantic Coast Championship Wrestling
  • Ace [Poker] The highest or lowest card in the deck. If the cards are arranged in order, the ace either starts this sequence: A-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-T-J-Q-K; or finishes this one: 2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-T-J-Q-K-A. In high poker, the ace is the highest card in a hand, with one exception: when it is part of a 5-high straight, that is, in this hand: A-2-3-4-5, of mixed suits.
  • Ace Adjustment [Blackjack] Usually refers to a side count of aces kept in addition to the main count. An ace adjustment is commonly used to vary strategy and bets based upon both the main count and the number of aces counted.
  • Ace Caught a Deuce [Craps] Betting that the next roll will be the total sum of 3 (2&1).
  • Ace in the Hole [Poker] In a stud game, having an ace as one's down card or one of one's down cards. This being a desirable condition, the phrase passed into general usage as an advantage or resource kept in reserve until an opportunity presents itself.
  • Ace Neutral Count [Blackjack] Any counting system which does not assign a value to aces.
  • Ace Out [Poker] To win (perhaps by bluffing) while holding an ace high hand (that is, a relatively worthless hand, since it doesn't contain even a pair). This phrase passed into general usage with the meaning of winning by deception or just barely beating someone. (If your opponent holds a totally worthless hand, an ace-high hand would just barely beat him; that is, you would ace him out.)
  • Ace Poor [Blackjack] A point where less aces than normal expectation would dictate have been dealt. The deck, pack or shoe is then considered to be ace poor.
  • Ace Reckoned Count [Blackjack] Any counting system which includes aces as a part of the main count. For example, hi-lo is an ace reckoned count, but Hi-Opt I is not.
  • Ace Rich [Blackjack] Whenever there are more aces in the deck, pack or shoe than normal expectation would dictate.
  • Ace to Five [Poker] In a game played for low, ace to five means straights and flushes don't count and the ace can be used as a low card. The best possible hand in an ace to five game is therefore A2345 (often called a wheel).
  • Ace Up the Sleeve [Poker] Describing the situation in which a cheater has withdrawn an ace from the deck to be introduced into the game later, or, more generally, has taken some unfair advantage. The phrase passed into general usage to describe the situation in which someone is hiding some probably unfair advantage.
  • Ace-Deuce [Craps] Betting that the next roll will be the total sum of 3 (2&1)
  • Ace-High [Poker] A five-card hand containing an ace but no pair; beats a king-high, but loses to any pair or above.
  • Ace-High Straight Flush [Poker] A royal flush.
  • Ace-to-Five Draw [Poker] In a game played for low, ace to five means straights and flushes don't count and the ace can be used as a low card. The best possible hand in an ace to five game is therefore A2345 (often called a wheel).
  • Ace-to-Five Lowball [Poker] In a game played for low, ace to five means straights and flushes don't count and the ace can be used as a low card. The best possible hand in an ace to five game is therefore A2345 (often called a wheel).
  • Acepots [Poker] A form of high draw poker, in which a player cannot open the pot without holding at least two aces as openers.
  • Aces [Craps] Betting that the next roll will be the total sum of 2 (1&1)
  • Aces and Spaces [Poker] A five-card hand consisting of two aces and three other worthless cards.
  • Aces Full [Poker] A full house with aces over any pair.
  • Aces Over [Poker] 1) Pairs, one of which is aces. 2) A full house with aces over any pair.
  • Aces Up [Poker] Pairs, one of which is aces.
  • Acetone [Golf] Chemical used to bring ferrules to a high luster as a final step in assembly. Acetone is rubbed onto the ferrule with a rag or towel in order to obtain the luster.
  • Acey-Deucey [Poker] 1) Two pairs, aces and deuces. 2) In hold 'em, A-2 as one's first two cards. 3) A non-poker game, usually played in home games, but also found rarely in casinos, in which players bet that a third card in succession will fall in rank between the first two, which are dealt face up before the bet. Sometimes called Red Dog.
  • Acey-Deucy [Horse Racing] Uneven stirrups, popularized by jockey Eddie Arcaro, who rode with his left (inside) iron lower than his right to achieve better balance on turns.
  • Acey-Uppy [Poker] Pairs, one of which is aces.
  • Acquisition Fee [Motor Sports] A fee charged by the leasing company to buy the vehicle for the lessee and set up the lease. Also called the initiation fee, this typically runs about $450.
  • Acro [Freestyle Skating] One of the three competitive disciplines in freestyle skiing, formerly known as ballet. Short for "acrobatic," this discipline consists of a choreographed routine made up of spins, jumps, steps, and acrobatic maneuvers done to music. Competitors are judged for technical difficulty, composition, and style.
  • Across the Board [Greyhound Racing] You make three individual bets on one dog to Win, Place, and Show. If your selection wins, you collect on all three bets. If your selection runs second, you collect on Place and Show bets. If your selection runs third, you collect the Show bet. Your total wager will be three times the individual bet. For example; a $2 'Across The Board' bet would cost $6.
  • Across the Card [General] Meaning to bet in doubles etc. on simultaneous races.
  • Act [Motor Sports] American-Canadian Tour, a former rival to ASA. ACT was similar to, but smaller than, ASA; they sanctioned similar classes of cars, mainly in the Upper Plains and central Canada. Tom Curley, the sanctioning body's owner, shut it down at the end of the 1995 season.
  • Act of God [Motor Sports] Any accident or event that is not by human hand and can not be prevented. Usually a natural cause.
  • Action [Poker] 1) The relative liveliness of a game, often measured by the frequency and quantity of bets and raises. "This game has a lot of action." Often part of the phrase fast action. 2) Being required to act. When it's your turn to do something, someone might say, "It's your action," or, "The action is up to you." 3) That portion of the pot that a player short of the full bet can win a multiple of. In a no-limit game, if John bets $100, Jim calls the whole $100, and you call, but you have only $20, you are said to have $20 worth of action in the pot. A side pot of $160 will be created between John and Jim; $20 of John's bet goes into the main pot, as does $20 of Jim's bet, and all of your bet; you can win the $60 main pot if you win.
  • Action Button [Poker] A bet that must be posted, in a seven-card stud high-low game, by the winner of a scoop pot above a certain size, signifying a full bet (a blind raise, in other words), rather than just a call of the original forced bet. Any player who acts before the action button can only call the bring-in. The holder of the action button essentially raises blind, and then, when it gets back to those who have only so far called the opening bet, they can either call or raise. For example, if the low card normally must bet $1 in a $5-$10 game, and there is an action button out, anyone who calls the $1 is committing to bet $5 later. No one would call the $1 without intending at least to call the blind raise by the action button. Whether the action button acts in turn, or after everyone else has acted, depends on the card room.
  • Action Only [Poker] In many card rooms, with respect to an all-in bet, only a full bet is considered a legitimate wager, in terms of whether this constitutes a raise that can be re-raised. Anything less than a full bet is considered to be action only, that is, other players can call such a bet but not raise it. For example, Chloe bets $10. Henry calls. John goes all in for $14. When the bet gets back to Chloe, she is permitted only to call the extra $4; the same goes for John. See discussion at full bet.
  • Action Player [Roulette] 1. A player who bets big and for long periods of time. 2. Can be a euphemism for stupid player.
  • Active [Poker] Still in contention for a pot. "Before the draw, there were five people in the pot; after the draw, there were three active players."
  • Active Career Batting Leaders [Baseball] Minimum of 1,000 At Bats required for Batting Average, On-Base Percentage, Slugging Percentage, At Bats Per HR, At Bats Per GDP, At Bats Per RBI, and K/BB Ratio. One hundred (100) Stolen Base Attempts required for Stolen Base Success %. Any player who appeared in 1995 is eligible for inclusion provided he meets the category's minimum requirements.
  • Active Career Pitching Leaders [Baseball] Minimum of 750 Innings Pitched required for Earned Run Average, Opponent Batting Average, all of the Per 9 Innings categories, and Strikeout to Walk Ratio. Two hundred fifty (250) Games Started required for Complete Game Frequency. One hundred (100) decisions required for Win-Loss Percentage. Any player who appeared in 1995 is eligible for inclusion provided he meets the category's minimum requirements.
  • Active Hand [Poker] A hand still in contention for a pot.
  • Active Player [Poker] A player who is still in the pot.
  • Actual Cash Value (Acv) [Motor Sports] Replacement cost of property lost. If your vehicle were stolen, totaled in an accident, or otherwise rendered a loss, the Actual Cash Value is equal to the cost for a similar vehicle at current market prices.
  • Actuator [Motor Sports] A device that performs a mechanical action in response to an input signal, which may be electrical or fluidic.
  • Acupressure [Horse Racing] Utilizing stimulation on acupuncture points to treat an animal.
  • Acupuncture [Horse Racing] A centuries-old means of treating an animal or human through the use of needles, electrical current or moxibustion (heat and herbs) to stimulate or realign the body's electrical fields.
  • Acw [Wrestling] Alternative Championship Wrestling
  • Acwa [Wrestling] American Championship Wrestling Alliance
  • Ad [Table Tennis] Short for advantage.
  • Ad in [Table Tennis] Indicates that the server has the advantage.
  • Ad Out [Table Tennis] Indicates that the player returning serve has the advantage.
  • Adams Division [Ice Hockey] With the Patrick Division made up the Wales Conference until the 1992-93 season; renamed the Northeast Division of the Eastern Conference starting with the 1993-94 season.
  • Adaya [Archery] An arrow which has missed it's target, Japan.
  • Add-on [Poker] The opportunity to buy additional chips in some tournaments. Some tournaments allow players the opportunity at a certain point to buy additional chips, called an add- on. This is different from a re-buy, because usually anyone still in the tournament can add on, and the opportunity to add-on usually marks the end of the re-buy period. I was in such bad chip position, I decided it wasn't worth paying for the add-on.
  • Added Game [General] A game not part of Las Vegas regular rotation posted as an accommodation to customers. This is always a straight bet.
  • Added Money [Horse Racing] Money added to a purse by the racing association or by sponsors, state-bred programs or other funds added to the money paid by horse owners as nomination, entry, sustaining and other fees.
  • Added Purse [Horse Racing] Purse money that was enhanced by payments made by owners and/or breeders.
  • Added Weight [Horse Racing] A horse carrying more weight than the conditions of the race require, usually because the jockey exceeds the stated limit.
  • Adding Spoiler [Motor Sports] This is a term used to describe the changing of the direction of a spoiler or wing on a race car. Usually adjusting the angle of the spoiler creates downforce and gives more grip on the race track.
  • Additional Insured [Motor Sports] A person or company, other than the person named on the account who is protected against damage or loss.
  • Additional Insured/Loss Payee [Motor Sports] Since the lessor owns the leased vehicle, the lessee is required to name the lessor "additional insured" in his insurance liability-coverage policy and as the "loss payee" in his collision and comprehensive policy.
  • Address [Golf] The stance taken by a player in preparing to hit the ball. The positioning of your body in relationship to the golf ball. Same as "addressing the ball".
  • Addressing the Ball [Golf] Not Ed Norton's "Hello, ball," but rather taking a stance and grounding the club before taking a swing.
  • Adequan [Horse Racing] Brand name for polysulfated glycosaminoglycan, used in the treatment of certain arthritic conditions.
  • Adjusted Capitalized Cost [Motor Sports] The basis for the basic monthly payment.
  • Adjuster [Motor Sports] The person working with the insurance agency who determines the amount of damage, loss, and liability.
  • Admeasure [Sailing] Formal measurement of a boat for documentation.
  • Admiralty Law [Sailing] The "law of the sea".
  • Admission [Bingo] Most bingo halls or parlors have a minimum number of cards that you must purchase as the price of "admission." Typically you must purchase an "admission packet." The packet usually contains three to six card for every regular game. Packets also usually contain some special games. Exactly what is part of the admission packet varies widely from hall to hall.
  • Adra [Motor Sports] American Drag Racing Association, located in Spokane, Washington.
  • Adrenaline [Skydiving] Start skydiving and you'll find out.
  • Adrenotrend System [Roulette] A progressive system of betting whereby two numbers are cancelled every time a previous bet is won, and one number, the total of two end numbers, is added whenever a previous bet is lost.
  • Adrift [Sailing] Floating free with the currents and tide, not under control.
  • Advance [Field Hockey] To push, shove, or advance the ball in any way, using body, hands, or feet rather than the stick. Advancing is a foul.
  • Advance Wagering [Golf] Wagers that are accepted on a race later during a performance or on a future performance.
  • Advanced Omega Ii System [Blackjack] A Level 2 card counting system described in Bryce Carlson's book, Blackjack for Blood. It is a balanced count which assigns the values of plus one to 2s, 3s and 7s, plus two to 4s, 5s and 6s, minus one to 9s and minus two to ten valued cards.
  • Advantage [Blackjack] Player's or more rarely the casino's expected rate of win or loss, usually given as a percentage of total money put into action. A player may be said to have a 1% advantage in a certain game. This means that the player can expect to have a 1% return on all of the money bet in that game.
  • Advantage Player [Poker] A thief or cheater, that is, someone who wins by taking an advantage.
  • Advantage Rule [Soccer] A clause in the rules that directs the referee to refrain from stopping play for a foul if a stoppage would benefit the team that committed the violation.
  • Advantage Tool [Poker] A cheating device, as a marked card or a mechanical device for hiding one or more cards, as, for example, a holdout machine.
  • Advantages [Soccer] Situations where a team has possession of the ball and outnumbers the opposition near the opposing goal.
  • Advertise [Poker] To make a bluff with the deliberate intention of being exposed as a loose player. Advertising usually means showing down a mediocre hand, to give the impression that you play overly loose or that you play a generally weak game. The idea is that other players will then give you more action when you make a legitimate hand. Since people are bad at revising first impressions, this potentially beneficial effect can be long-lasting. Typical advertising plays in hold'em might be to show down top pair with a weak kicker (e.g., K2), middle pair, or a gut shot draw that missed. These hands have marginal intrinsic value, but playing them early in a session might pay off later. Of course, it's best to advertise if you actually want to be called down more often, e.g., at an especially tight table. At a table full of calling stations, it might be unnecessary or even harmful. Advertising can also mean anything you do at the poker table to manipulate how other players assess you.
  • Advertised Price, Average [Motor Sports] The average listed price for a given year, make and model combination, among the cars currently listed on AutoTrader.com.
  • Advertised Price, Highest [Motor Sports] The highest listed price for a given year, make and model combination, among the cars currently listed on AutoTrader.com.

B

  • B [Poker] The second position to the left of the dealer. Sometimes called just B.
  • B-Dealer [Poker] A Bottom Dealer. A cheat who deals cards from the bottom of the deck. Also sometimes called b-dealer, subway dealer, or cellar dealer.
  • B-Game [Poker] The second-highest game in a particular club.
  • B-Main [Motor Sports] A second-chance race sometimes seen at an event that uses heat races to determine qualifying and starting positions for the feature. The B-main includes all cars who failed to finish in a qualifying position in their respective heat races, and a certain number of additional qualifying positions are available to the B-main's top finishers. Also called a "last chance" or "B-heat" race. Some very large events might use a third level of heat race for cars that fail to qualify in the B-main race(s), and this would be referred to as the C-main. Compare to consolation race.
  • B-Pillar [Motor Sports] Vertical metal roof support between front and rear side windows on the side of the vehicle.
  • B-Post [Motor Sports] Post extending from the roof line to the base of window behind the driver's head.
  • B.R. [General] Bankroll.
  • B.V.M.S. [Horse Racing] Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Surgery.
  • B.V.Sc. [Horse Racing] Bachelor of Veterinary Science.
  • Ba Scpos Allowed [Baseball] Batting Average Allowed with Runners in Scoring Position.
  • Ba-Fa [Martial Arts] (Chinese) The 8 therapeutic principles of the traditional Chinese medicine. The Ba-fa are predefined techniques of treatment which are used in several methods like meditation, body exercises...).
  • Ba-Poker Dictionary [Poker] An Internet mailing list, based in the San Francisco Bay Area (hence the ba) devoted to discussions of poker.
  • Baby [Poker] A small card, usually a deuce through five in games other than lowball, and ace through five in lowball. "I caught a baby."
  • Baby Race [Horse Racing] A race for two-year-olds.
  • Baby Split [Bowling] The 2-7 or 3-10 split.
  • Baby Split with Company [Bowling] The 2-7-8 or 3-9-10 split.
  • Baby the Ball [Bowling] To release the ball too carefully, at the expense of the follow-through.
  • Babyface [Wrestling] One of the good guys; a popular wrestler; usually just referred to as a "face."
  • Baccarat [General] A card game where the winning hand totals closest to 9 discounting all units of 10. Originating from the game, Chemin de Fer.
  • Baccarat a Deux Tableau [Baccarat] A variation of chemin de fer (old form of baccarat, played in Europe), where three hands are dealt, and there are no set rules governing the bank's play. Also known as Baccarat en Banque.
  • Baccarat En Banque [Baccarat] A variation of chemin de fer (old form of baccarat, played in Europe), where three hands are dealt, and there are no set rules governing the bank's play. Also known as Baccarat a deux tableau.
  • Baccarat Rules of Play [Baccarat] The highest total any baccarat hand can have is nine. A two card total of nine is called a "natural" and cannot lose. An eight is the second best hand and is also called a natural. If both player and bank are dealt identical hands, it is a standoff (a tie) and neither bank nor player wins. No further cards can be drawn to a two card draw of 6 or 7.
  • Back [Rugby] One of the players usually numbered 9 through 15. Except for the scrumhalf, backs don't take part in scrums or lineouts.
  • Back at the Knee [Horse Racing] A leg that looks like it has a backward arc with its center at the knee when viewed from the side.
  • Back Counting [Blackjack] Counting cards while standing behind the players at a table and not playing. This technique is particularly useful with multiple-deck shoes.
  • Back Door [Golf] The rear of the hole. When a putt goes around the hole and then drops in the back of the cup, it is said to have gone in the back door. Sometimes used as a verb, as in, "He back doored that putt."
  • Back Door Flush (Or Straight) [Poker] Catching two cards to a flush.
  • Back Edge [Fencing] The edge of a sabre blade opposite the cutting edge.
  • Back Flip [Freestyle Skating] A backward somersault performed in the air.
  • Back Full [Freestyle Skating] A back flip with a full twist, in the layout position.
  • Back Gate [Motor Sports] Literally, the gate on the back stretch at a short track where car trailers or transporters are let into the pits or garage area, but the term is used by promoters to mean the number of cars and teams that actually show up and attempt to qualify for a race. It's an axiom in the racing industry that the back gate (number of participating cars) has a direct effect on the front gate (number of paying spectators), and so good promoters work hard at keeping their back gate as high as possible.
  • Back Giant [Gymnastics] A giant that begins with the body moving backward.
  • Back Handspring [Gymnastics] A back flip using both hands on the floor or apparatus, beginning and ending in a standing position. The legs come over the head as a unit. Compare back walkover.
  • Back Header [Soccer] A player's use of his head to direct the ball backwards.
  • Back in [Poker] 1) In a pass-and-back-in game, come into the pot after having passed. 2) Come into a pot cheaply as a result of having a blind and there not having been a raise.
  • Back into [Poker] 1) Win a pot unexpectedly or by default. For example, in a lowball game, John drew three cards and caught K-Q-J. He passed after the draw, planning to fold if anyone bet. The three one-card draws also passed, all having paired and all afraid to bet, and John backed into the pot. 2) End up with a hand other than the one you were drawing to. For example, in seven-card stud, start with two pair on the first four cards and end up with a flush.
  • Back Layout [Synchro Swimming] A position in which the body is extended with the face, chest, thighs, and feet at the surface. Head, hips and ankles should be in line.
  • Back Line [Field Hockey] One of two lines marking the lengthwise boundaries of the field. The goal line is the section of the back line between the goal posts.
  • Back Line Skinner [Craps] Betting that the next roll will be the number of 7.
  • Back Lip [Golf] The edge of the bunker that is farthest from the green.
  • Back Marker [Horse Racing] In a standing start event, which is handicapped, the horse who is given the biggest handicap is known as the backmarker. For instance, in a race five horses may start off the front (who travel the nominated race distance), three off ten metres (who travel the race distance plus an extra ten metres), one off 20 metres and one off 30 metres. The horse starting from 30 metres is known as the back marker.
  • Back Nine [Golf] The second 9 holes on an 18-hole course.
  • Back of the Bow [Archery] The surface of the bow furthest from the archer when they hold the bow in the firing position.
  • Back Off [Blackjack] To ask a player to not play Blackjack. This occurs when casino personnel, usually a manager or a pit boss asks a blackjack player to no longer play the game of blackjack in that casino. It can also refer to less harsh anti counter measures, such as restricting a player to flat betting or a very small bet spread, such as a 1-2 spread.
  • Back Out [Motor Sports] When a driver takes his foot off the gas pedal (all the way or part way), he "backs out" or "lifts off."
  • Back Peek [Poker] A cheating maneuver that enables the dealer to see the face of the top card on the deck, accomplished by squeezing the top of the deck between thumb and little finger in such a way as to bow the top card in the middle so that its value can be surreptitiously viewed. This move is made prior to dealing seconds. Also called heel peek.
  • Back Peel [Croquet] Peeling a ball through its wicket, immediately after running that wicket.
  • Back Pike [Synchro Swimming] A position in which the body is bent at the hips to form a 45-degree angle or less and the legs and trunk extended, with the back straight and the head in line.
  • Back Raise [Poker] To make a small raise to prevent further or larger raises, when the number of raises in a betting interval is limited. Usually permitted only in home games, in which the rule that a raise must equal in size the previous bet or raise does not hold.
  • Back Row [Rugby] The two flankers and the No. 8 man, lined up for a scrum.
  • Back Seat [Freestyle Skating] An undesirable situation in which the skier's weight isn't centered over the skis in the stacked position.
  • Back Side [Golf] Same as back nine.
  • Back Splash [Rowing] Spray toward the bow from an oar that enters the water on recovery.
  • Back Straight [Greyhound Racing] The straight length of the track or paceway farthest away from the spectators and the winning post.
  • Back Tackle [Soccer] An attempt by a defender to take the ball away from a ball carrier by swinging the defender's leg in front of the ball from behind.
  • Back Tuck [Freestyle Skating] A single back flip in the tuck position.
  • Back Up [Horse Racing] The action of a horse slowing down noticeably.
  • Back Walkover [Gymnastics] A move that begins with a back arch or bridge position, in which one foot is brought down to the front, followed by the other foot. Compare back handspring.
  • Back Weight [Golf] A weight, usually brass or aluminum attached to the back of a wooden, graphite or titanium wood head. Powerbilt popularized the use of back weights on their woods in the 1960’s and 70’s. The back weight is designed to move the center of gravity rearward to assist in getting the ball airborne.
  • Back! [Baseball] Exclamation - emphatic instruction to runner about to be picked off base, when the pitcher or catcher is throwing to the base. Usually shrieked at the top of one's voice, by base coaches and/or team mates.
  • Back-Arching [Wrestling] Throwing an opponent from his feet to his back
  • Back-in, Full-Out [Gymnastics] A double salto with a full twist, the twist completed during the second salto. Compare full-in, back-out.
  • Back-Step [Wrestling] The action (footwork, level changes, etc.) taken tobegin back-step throws (headlock, hiplock, etc.)
  • Back-to-Back [Poker] Serially, or in a row. "I drew two cards and caught back-to-back kings."
  • Backboard [Basketball] A 6-by-4-foot rectangular structure of wood or fiberglass that holds the basket.
  • Backcheck [Ice Hockey] An attempt by a player, on his way back to his defensive zone, to regain the puck from the opposition by checking or harassing an opponent who has the puck.
  • Backcountry Skiing [Skiing] Recreational cross country skiing away from developed land and open roads.
  • Backcourt [Basketball] 1. The area from the center line to the baseline nearest the basket being defended by the team. 2. A team's guards, considered as a unit, as in, "Duke has an excellent backcourt."
  • Backcourt Violation [Basketball] The failure to bring the ball from the backcourt into the frontcourt in the allotted 10 seconds; a violation. See also over and back.
  • Backdoor [Poker] Catching both the turn and river card to make a drawing hand. For instance, suppose you have As- 7s. The flop comes Ad-6c-4s. You bet and are called. The turn is the Ts, which everybody checks, and then the river is the Js. You've made a "backdoor" nut flush.
  • Backdoor Play [Basketball] A fundamental basketball play in which one player passes to a teammate in the high post, and when the defenders follow the ball, another player cuts to the basket from the opposite side of the court to take a pass for an open shot.
  • Backdoor Slider [Baseball] A pitch that appears to be out of the strike zone, but then breaks back over the plate.
  • Backdoor Straight [Poker] Catching two cards to a straight.
  • Backed [General] When a bookmaker takes a lot of money on one particular side, it is said that this team has been heavily backed. It is where the punter has put his money on.
  • Backed Bow [Archery] A bow consisting primarily of wood but having a thin strip of a material (wood or hide) attached to the back of the bow.
  • Backed in [General] See shorten. A horse which is backed in means that investors have outlaid a lot of money on that horse, with the result being a decrease in the odds offered.
  • Backed Up [Poker] 1) Paired. "I have kings backed up" means, in a draw poker game, "I have one pair, kings." In hold 'em, wired. 2) In seven stud, having a pair in the hole.
  • Backed-in [Horse Racing] A horse which is backed-in means that bettors have outlaid a lot of money on that horse, with the result being a decrease in the odds offered.
  • Backer [Poker] Someone who finances another player. "How you gonna get into the tournament? I thought you were broke." "I have a backer."
  • Backfield [Football] The area behind the line of scrimmage.
  • Backhand [Tennis] A ground stroke hit on the left of the body by right-handed players, and on the right of the body by left-handers.
  • Backhand Shot [Ice Hockey] A shot or pass made with the stick from the left side by a right-handed player or from the right side by a left-handed player.
  • Backing [Poker] The cash supplied by a backer (Someone who finances another player.). "How you gonna get into the tournament? I thought you were broke." "I have backing."
  • Backing (Wind) [Sailing] The changing of the wind direction, opposite of veering. Clockwise in the southern hemisphere, counter-clockwise in the northern hemisphere.
  • Backline [Poker] 1) Make an agreement between two or more players to accumulate chips in the following manner. One of the players usually maintains the back line. Whenever he or the player with whom he has made the arrangement wins a pot, a certain portion of the chips in that pot are put on the back line, that is, in a pool for later distribution. That amount could be one chip for each pot. It could be some specified larger amount, perhaps five or 10 chips. In a limit game, it could also be one chip for each bet in the pot, or one for each bet won by the winner of the pot. For example, in a $10-limit game, if two players are back lining one chip per bet, and one of them wins a $100 pot (that is, the pot contains 10 bets), $10 goes on the back line. If they are back lining one chip per bet won, and both of them (only) are in the pot, only $5 goes on the back line (because the winner of the pot profited by $50, or five bets). At some prearranged time, the players split the back line. That is the point of this arrangement, that when one of the players is running bad, he makes some money off his "partner's" good fortune. If the player who maintains the back line runs out of his own chips, there may be some argument about whether those chips are playable, or if the other player runs out of chips, he may want to get his share of the back line. For the reason that arguments sometimes arise from this sort of arrangement, many clubs do not permit back lining. In such clubs, some obstinate players do it anyway, but surreptitiously. It's best when back lining that all parties involved in the agreement maintain sufficient chips to avoid running out in one pot or having to use the back line chips to bet with. A sharp tight player tries to make a back lining arrangement with a loose player. The loose player may lose money overall, but he wins more pots (because he plays more pots), and so the back line accumulates. The loose player doesn't mind contributing when he's winning, and when he's losing, and his "partner" is lucky, he gets something from it. He just doesn't realize that he's taking the worst of it in yet another situation. 2) The chips accumulated by back lining. The name probably comes from where the chips are kept. The back line is usually a stack of chips behind the player's own playing capital. Sometimes the back line is kept on the wooden rim, if the table has one.
  • Backpoints [Wrestling] Points gotten by having exposed an opponents back to the mat; in freestyle, any exposure leads to backpoints, while in folkstyle the back must be exposed for a certain length of time.
  • Backs [Poker] The reverse sides of the cards, as opposed to the sides that show their ranks and suits.
  • Backscratcher [Freestyle Skating] A trick in which the skier touches his or her back with the tails of the skis.
  • Backscrew [Golf] Steel pin or screw used to help secure a steel shaft to a wooden wood head. The backscrew is located on the back of the heel approximately ľ” from the sole of the club.
  • Backside [Horse Racing] The stable and training area of a racetrack.
  • Backslide [Skydiving] To move backward in freefall relative to a neutral reference. Usually unintentional and undesirable, caused by poor body position.
  • Backspin [Golf] The backward rotation of the ball on its horizontal axis influenced by the loft of the clubface, the angle of approach and the clubhead velocity. (A ball struck below its center with any club that has loft, even a putter, will have backspin in the airborne portion of its flight. The greater the backspin, the steeper the ball will fly and more quickly it will stop.
  • Backsplice [Sailing] A method of weaving the end of a rope to keep it from unraveling.
  • Backstay [Sailing] A stay (line or cable) used to support the mast. The backstay runs from the masthead to the stern and helps keep the mast from falling forward.
  • Backstop [Rowing] A small block on the bow end of the slide, which holds the seat on track.
  • Backstretch [Greyhound Racing] The area of the racetrack opposite the finish line. At most tracks, it is the area that crosses in front of the Tote board.
  • Backstretch (Racing Surface Term) [Horse Racing] This is the straight-away section on the far side of the track.
  • Backstretch (Stable Area) [Horse Racing] At many of the track sites the stable area is found adjacent to the back side of the track. Due to this proximity the stable name is sometimes referred to as the backstretch.
  • Backswing [Golf] The motion of the club, hands, arms and body away from the ball creating the potential energy to be delivered downward, outward and forward through the ball.
  • Backsword [Fencing] An archaic, edged, unpointed sword used in prizefighting; also singlestick.
  • Backtrack [Roulette] The outer, stationary rim of the roulette wheel where the ball is spun. Also called the ball-track.
  • Backup [Bowling] A ball that breaks in the wrong direction, e.g. to the right for a right-handed bowler.
  • Backup Car [Motor Sports] A complete and set up second car brought to the race by each team. The backup car may not be unloaded at any time during all NASCAR national series practices or pre-race activities, unless the primary car is damaged beyond repair. Backup cars must also pass all NASCAR inspections.
  • Backward [Horse Racing] A horse that is either too young or not fully fit.
  • Backward Dive [Diving] Any dive on which the diver begins with his or her back toward the water.
  • Backwinded [Sailing] When the wind pushes on the wrong side of the sail, causing it to be pushed away from the wind. If the lines holding the sail in place are not released, the boat could become hard to control and heel excessively.
  • Bad [Poker] A hand of a particular type that will not beat many other hands of that type. Often used in low games to indicate non-nut low hands with a particular high card. A rough 8 in ace to five lowball could be any eight high hand other than 8432A, although 8532A isn't too rough. Rough is the opposite of smooth.
  • Bad Actor [Horse Racing] Fractious horse.
  • Bad Actor (Fractious Horse) [Horse Racing] A horse that acts up from time to time when it leaves the receiving barn for the race. Some signs are kicking, resisting being saddled, fighting it's handler or even attempt to savage it's handler. Sometimes this activity will exhaust the horse before it has a chance to run.
  • Bad Beat [Poker] A very good hand, often a full house or higher, that is beat by an even better hand.
  • Bad Doer [Horse Racing] A horse with a poor appetite, a condition that may be due to nervousness or other causes.
  • Bad Game [Poker] Any game in which you figure to be the loser, because the other players are better than you.
  • Bad Knees [Horse Racing] Natural infirmity or due to injury.
  • Bad-Beat Jackpot [Poker] In some card-rooms, a prize that is shared by the players in a game, when a very good hand (usually Aces full, or better) is beaten by a higher hand. Jackpots are usually financed by taking a drop ($1 is a common amount) from every pot. A typical division of the jackpot will give the losing hand 50 %, the winning hand 25 %, and the other players at the table share the remaining 25 % of the Jackpot
  • Bad-Beat Story [Poker] A story told by someone who lost a pot, often a big one, in a bad beat. Usually no one but the teller is interested in hearing the story. The analog in the fishing world is the one that got away.
  • Badge Horse [Horse Racing] Single horse in stable entitling owner to admission badge.
  • Badik [Martial Arts] A Malayan dagger shaped like a butterfly whose straight blade bears one sharp edge.
  • Baff [Golf] An obsolete term, Scottish in origin, meaning to hit or graze the ground behind the ball.
  • Baffle [Golf] Previous name given to a 5 wood.
  • Baffy [Golf] A lofted wooden club developed from the baffling-spoon no longer in use. Also the alternate name given to the 4 wood.
  • Bag [Baseball] The soft, white thing used to mark a base. Usually canvas or vinyl stuffed with straw.
  • Baglock [Skydiving] A malfunction in which the canopy is trapped inside the bag and cannot be deployed. The reason for this malfunction is almost always an incorrect pack job. To avoid a bad case of frapping, the reserve needs to be pulled immediately.
  • Bagman [General] An intermediary who picks up and delivers money.
  • Bail [Sailing] To remove water from a boat, as with a bucket or a pump.
  • Bail Out [Golf] To avoid or get out of trouble. There are two different senses here: Making a long putt is one way of bailing out; another is to hit a safe shot rather than risk playing the ball into a hazard.
  • Bait [Poker] A small bet made to encourage a raise.
  • Bajutsu [Martial Arts] Japanese art of horsemanship. Also known as jobajutsu.
  • Bak [Blackjack] An abbreviation for Back At the Keyboard, used during chat.
  • Baker [Poker] The second position to the left of the dealer. Sometimes called just B.
  • Bakers Bun [Bingo] 61
  • Bakspin [Golf] Term given to hickory shafted clubs which contained large grooves in their faces. These grooves were much deeper and wider than grooves on modern clubs.
  • Bal [Martial Arts] Foot.
  • Balaclava [Motor Sports] Head sock. Sometimes pronounced "ba-CLAH-va", with the second syllable not pronounced.
  • Balance [Golf] Equilibrium in a static position, i.e., at address (see Dynamic Balance).
  • Balance Beam [Gymnastics] 1) A piece of apparatus 120 centimeters high, 10 centimeters wide, and 500 centimeters long. 2) A women's event performed on the apparatus. The balance beam routine lasts 70 to 90 seconds and includes a variety of acrobatic, gymnastic, and dance moves, ending with a dismount.
  • Balance Due [Motor Sports] The amount currently due, minus previous payments, plus cash advances and purchases.
  • Balance Point [Golf] The point at which a shaft achieves equilibrium; the point at which a shaft’s weight is evenly distributed in both directions when rested on a single fulcrum point.

C

  • C [Poker] Clubs (the suit), in written text. Kc, for example, is the king of clubs (K ).
  • C'mon, Talk it Up! [Baseball] An admonishment to a team from a coach or leading player, to make encouraging noise in support of a side or player. In club baseball this is usually called by the batting side, as they are together on the bench.
  • C-1 [Canoeing] Designation for a one-person Canadian canoe.
  • C-2 [Canoeing] Designation for a two-person Canadian canoe.
  • C-4 [Canoeing] Designation for a four-person Canadian canoe.
  • C-Game [Poker] Any low-stakes game, generally the third highest in a given establishment.
  • C-I-X [Poker] In lowball, a 6-high hand. When a player shows down a 6-high, he sometimes announces his holding by spelling out, "c-i-x."
  • C-Note [Poker] A $100 bill.
  • C-Pillar [Motor Sports] The vertical metal roof support between the side edge of the rear windshield (also called the backlight) and the rear edge of the rear window.
  • C-Post [Motor Sports] The post extending from the roof line of a race car to the base of the rear window to the top of the deck lid.
  • C.H.O.R.S.E [Poker] A game or tournament format in which six forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are Chowaha, limit hold 'em, Omaha/8, razz, seven-card stud (high), and seven-card stud high-low.
  • C.H.O.R.S.E.L [Poker] A game or tournament format in which seven forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are Chowaha, limit hold 'em, Omaha/8, razz, seven-card stud (high), seven-card stud high-low, and lowball.
  • Ca [Greyhound Racing] Caliente, Mexico
  • Cab-Over [Powerboating] A boat in which the driver sits in front of the engine. Such a boat usually has a pickle-fork bow.
  • Cabin [Sailing] A room inside a boat.
  • Cactus League [Baseball] A term used to describe the major league teams which conduct spring training and play exhibition games in the U.S. southwest.
  • Caddie [Golf] A person who carries a player's clubs and may assist with advice, in accordance with the rules. Sometimes spelled "caddy."
  • Caddie (Caddy) [Golf] Someone who carries a player's club during play and offers him assistance in accordance with the rules.
  • Caddie Master [Golf] The golf course employee in charge of managing the caddies.
  • Caddie-Car [Golf] A golf car or car.
  • Cadence [Rowing] The beat at which the oarsmen are rowing. With coxed crews, the coxswain often raps out the cadence to keep the oarsmen pulling together.
  • Cadence Action [Synchro Swimming] A sequence of identical movements performed by all team members, individually and in rapid succession.
  • Caesar [Poker] The king of diamonds.
  • Caf [General] Confederation of African Football.
  • Cage [Roulette] A booth or room where the casino cashier resides. Here, you can exchange chips for cash (or vice versa), cash-out coins, place front money, etc. It is called a cage because it is usually enclosed by bars.
  • Cage Girl [Poker] A female cashier.
  • Cage Man [Poker] A cashier of the male persuasion.
  • Cage Person [Poker] Cashier, specifically, the person who dispenses chips to the floor personnel, cashes players in when they leave, cashes checks for players, sometimes sells chips to players, keeps track of players' banks, records the progress of stake players (if any), keeps track of time collections, etc.
  • Cager [Basketball] A basketball player; derived from the days when a wire mesh barrier surrounded the court to protect the fans from the players and vice versa.
  • Calamity Jane [Poker] The queen of spades. Named for the markswoman of the Old West (Martha Jane Canary, who is buried in Deadwood, SD, in 1903, next to Wild Bill Hickok), whose name some say was associated with prophecies of doom.
  • Calculator [Horse Racing] A mutuel clerk who computes pari-mutuel odds.
  • Calcutta [General] A betting event where the names of runners in a particular race are "auctioned off" to the highest bidder. The people who purchase the winner and placegetters then receive a percentage of the pool of bidding monies.
  • Calf-Kneed [Horse Racing] A conformation fault of the forelegs where the knee is seen to bend backwards when viewed from the side.
  • California [Poker] A form of poker found only in home games, a widow game in which each player receives five cards face down, as does a central area of the table, followed by a round of betting, and then the dealer turns up each central card, one at a time, each followed by another round of betting. At the showdown, each player uses the best five cards among his five and those of the widow. The game is often played high-low split. Also called Utah, Lamebrains, or California. Southern Cross is a variant of Cincinnati.
  • California Blind [Poker] Bet-or-fold, double limit draw poker (high), open on anything, with three traveling blinds.
  • California Draw [Poker] 1) High draw poker as most often played in limit games: pass-and-back-in before the draw, jacks or better to open, each player antes, and there are no blinds. 2) As played in no-limit games, bet-or-fold (before the draw) draw poker, open on anything, usually played winner blind or with one or more traveling blinds (see traveling blind), and sometimes also with antes from each player. For both definitions, often called just draw or high.
  • California Game [Poker] Any of the games played in the California games section of a card room or casino.
  • California Games [Poker] A set of card room games, formerly called Asian games, some of which resemble poker, but are not strictly poker, in which players place bets before receiving the hands on which they wager. Others resemble blackjack. In these games, to get around the legal restriction against banking games, the only interest the house has is to take a portion of every bet; one player acts as banker, playing one hand against each player in turn. These games include pai gow (played with tiles, and not a card game at all), pai gow poker, super nine (also called super pan nine), California blackjack (also called X blackjack, where X is the name of the club), California Aces (a variant of blackjack in which the object is to get closest to 22, with two aces being the best hand; similarly often called X aces), 13-card (not played with a banker).
  • California Lowball [Poker] Five card ace-to-five low draw poker with the joker, bet-or-fold before the draw, sevens rule after the draw.
  • Calipers [Golf] Measuring device commonly used to measure the diameters of grips and shafts. Calipers may be used to accurately measure other specifications of clubs as well.
  • Calk [Horse Racing] A projection on the heels of a horseshoe, similar to a cleat, on the rear shoes of a horse to prevent slipping, especially on a wet track. Also known as a "sticker." Sometimes incorrectly spelled "caulk."
  • Calks [Horse Racing] Small cleats inserted on the back end of a horse's shoe or racing plate that allows the horse a better grip of the surface. Sometimes called "mud calks."
  • Call [Wrestling] (verb) Despite popular belief, the idea that wrestling matches are scripted move-for-move is false. Instead, wrestlers call their moves by whispering or muttering somethinginto their opponent’s ear, and from this the opponent will know what move he is to perform or be ready to receive. One of the reasons why so many wrestlers have long hair is that this makes it easier to hide calls. Inevitably, fans watching at home will sometimes be able to hear a wrestler call a move if he says it too loudly or does it while the camera is too close (e.g. at the Capital Carnage pay-per-view in the UK, Billy Gunn was heard shouting 'that's it, stay down' to D-Lo Brown).
  • Call (The) [Horse Racing] Running position of horses in a race at various points.
  • Call a Play [Football] Instruct players to execute a pre-planned play.
  • Call Bet [Blackjack] A bet made without money or chips. Must be approved by a floor person or pit boss. Usually allowed only for customers with casino credit already approved, or with money on deposit in the casino cage. This procedure is highly irregular and may be illegal in some states.
  • Call Cold [Poker] To call a bet and raise at once.
  • Call for Insurance [Blackjack] To announce that the dealer has an Ace showing and pause to allow the players make an insurance bet, then the dealer will check the hole card and if it is a 10-value card the hand is over and the bets and side bets are settled, if it is not, the side bets are collected and the play of the hand continues.
  • Call Someone Down [Poker] Check each round, and call each bet made by an opponent (who presumably bets each round).
  • Call to the Post [Horse Racing] A special call played on a bugle used to signal the horses to the starting gate.
  • Called Game [Baseball] A game suspended or ended by the umpire.
  • Called Hand [Poker] A hand that someone bet and someone else called, as opposed to a hand that was bet and no one called. The term often comes up when a bet is made, called, and lost, and the bettor who lost the hand now wants to throw the cards away unshown (perhaps from embarrassment at being caught bluffing).
  • Caller [Bingo] The person who calls out the numbers as they are drawn; machines are normally used to randomly generate these numbers. Most clubs use two callers; the job of the main stage bingo caller tends to involve more showmanship than a prize or parti bingo caller's.
  • Calling Hand [Poker] A hand with which a player feels he must call a (often any) bet. "I knew you made it, but I had a calling hand."
  • Calling Station [Poker] A player who calls much too often is called a calling station. Such a player will pay you off when you make hands, and will often fail to press their advantage when they have relatively strong hands. On the other hand, calling stations will hit more backdoor and other unlikely draws than other players, making it occasionally frustrating to play against them, especially in large numbers.
  • Callman [Baccarat] The dealer who runs or calls the game of baccarat.
  • Calls [Golf] The position of each greyhound at specific points around the track during a race.
  • Cam [Motor Sports] The Championship Association of Mechanics, established in 1989, is a non-profit organization that serves the needs of Indy Car crew members. It also acts to publicize their efforts.
  • Cam Cleat [Sailing] A mechanical cleat used to hold a line automatically. It uses two spring loaded cams that come together to clamp their teeth on the line, which is place between them. Also see jam cleat.
  • Camber [Motor Sports] One of the three major front suspension geometry adjustments. The camber angle is the angle between the plane of the wheel (think of it as the plane of the hub face, or the brake rotor), and the vertical. On an oval track, setting the right front wheel to negative camber (the top of the wheel leaning toward the car) provides improved cornering traction. Camber is usually thought of as a front-end adjustment, but over the last few years, devices have been invented that make it possible to put a small amount of camber in the rear wheels while using an axle-type suspension.
  • Camel [Figure Skating] A spin performed on one leg, while the skater's other leg is extended in the air, parallel to the ice.
  • Camel Walk [Skiing] American term for passgang.
  • Camera Flyer [Skydiving] Freefall photographer equipped with camera(s) fastened to their helmet.
  • Camouflage [Blackjack] An action which is intended to hide the fact that a player is counting cards.
  • Campbell Conference [Ice Hockey] One of the two conferences in the NHL that contained the Norris and Smythe Divisions until 1992-93; the other conference was the Wales Conference; starting in 1993-94 these will be renamed the Eastern and Western Conferences.
  • Camshaft [Motor Sports] A machined shaft with lobes that open and close engine-cylinder intake and exhaust valves. As the shaft rotates, the lobes push against valve springs to open the valves and rotate away to close them. Driven by the crankshaft.
  • Can [Golf] In slang, to hole a putt.
  • Can Buoy [Sailing] A cylindrical buoy painted green and having an odd number used in the United States as a navigational aid. At night they may have a green light. Green buoys should be kept on the left side when returning from a larger body of water to a smaller one. Nun buoys mark the other side of the channel. Also see green and red daymarks
  • Can of Corn [Baseball] An easy catch by a fielder.
  • Can't Beat the Board [Poker] 1) In a stud game, have an entire seven-card hand that cannot beat the four exposed cards of another player. 2) In hold 'em, have a hand that cannot beat the board (The exposed cards); this implies that the player is playing the board.
  • Canadian [Greyhound Racing] Also known as a Super Yankee. A Canadian is a combination bet consisting of 26 bets with 5 selections in different events. The combination bet is made up of 10 doubles, 10 trebles, five 4-folds and one 5-fold.
  • Canadian (Super Yankee) [General] 5 selections, 26 bets - 10 doubles, 10 trebles, 5 four-timers, 1 accumulator.
  • Canadian Canoe [Canoeing] An open canoe propelled with a single-bladed paddle.
  • Canadian Line [General] A combination point spread and moneyline in hockey.
  • Canal [Sailing] A manmade waterway used to connect bodies of water that do not connect naturally. Canals use locks to raise and lower boats when connecting bodies of water that have different water levels. The Panama and Suez canals are two of the most famous.
  • Canard [Powerboating] A small wing, usually mounted between the sponsons.
  • Cancel [Keno] A Keno ticket has been cancelled before all games have played. Winnings are paid on games played and a refund is made on any games yet to play.
  • Cancellation Betting System [Roulette] A betting system using a series of numbers that cancels numbers after winning a bet and adds numbers after losing a bet. One specific type of Cancellation System is known as the LaBouchere System.
  • Candy Store [Bingo] 74
  • Canine [Poker] In hold 'em, K-9 as one's first two cards. Also, pedigree.
  • Canker [Horse Racing] Softening of the horn of the foot, generally starting in the frog.
  • Cannon [Horse Racing] On the foreleg this is the bone structure between the knee and the ankle. On the rear leg it is located between the hock and the ankle.
  • Cannon Bone [Horse Racing] The third metacarpal (front leg) or metatarsal (rear leg), also referred to as the shin bone. The largest bone between the knee and ankle joints.
  • Cannon Shot [Croquet] To make a roquet on the same shot as a croquet.
  • Canoe [Canoeing] Broadly speaking, any paddle-propelled craft with two pointed ends, which includes kayaks. But the word is often used to mean a Canadian canoe.
  • Canoe Stern [Sailing] A pointed stern, such as those on a canoe.
  • Canopy [Skydiving] The construction of fabric and lines used to land safely after a freefall. Modern parachutes are not round but elliptical in shape. Every jumper carries two: the main and reserve, stowed in the same container.
  • Canter [Equestrian Sports] A gait in which three legs are simultaneously off the ground. It's faster than a trot but slower than a gallop.
  • Canvas [Sailing] Tightely woven cloth used for sails, covers, dodgers and biminis. Typically made from cotton, hemp or linen. Modern sails are made out of synthetic materials generally known as sailcloth.
  • Cap [Poker] 1) After dealing the first round, put a chip on top of the un-dealt cards for protection; usually followed by the deck. 2) Put in the maximum number of raises in a round of betting; usually followed by the bet, the bets, or the betting. Make the maximum raise permitted in the current round. "I'll cap it" means that someone has put in the, say, third raise.
  • Cap/Ing, Capping of Bets [Blackjack] To illegally add money / placing extra chips to a winning bet after you receive at least one card while the dealer is distracted (To cap a bet). Easy to detect with video surveillance.
  • Capable [Poker] Having the ability to cheat. "Is he capable?" means "Is he a thief or mechanic?"
  • Capillary Refill Time [Horse Racing] The amount of time it takes for blood to return to capillaries after it has been forced out, normally two seconds; usually assessed pressing the thumb against the horse's gums. When the pressure is removed the gum looks white, but the normal pink color returns as blood flows into the capillaries.
  • Capitalized Cost [Motor Sports] In a lease transaction, the price at which a financial institution buys a vehicle from a dealer. Equivalent to the cash purchase price if the consumer were buying the vehicle outright, it includes taxes and any other additional charges. Also called Capital Cost.
  • Capitalized Cost Reduction [Motor Sports] In a lease transaction, an up-front payment made at the start of the lease. The lessee can use cash, a rebate or a trade-in. Similar but not equal to a down payment. The lessee must pay sales tax on the cap-cost reduction amount. Also called Capital-Cost Reduction.
  • Capitola. [Poker] Saying, often said by California dealers, that means "The betting is capped."
  • Capoeira [Martial Arts] A Brazilian form of combat adapted by African slaves to fight oppression. Capoeira is dance-like, and many believe it was developed this way to be disguised as a dance to the slave owners.
  • Capped [Poker] Describing the situation in which the maximum number of raises in a round of betting have been made.
  • Capped Dice [Craps] Crooked dice.
  • Capped Elbow [Horse Racing] Inflammation of the bursa over the point of the elbow. Also known as a "shoe boil." See bursitis.
  • Capped Hock [Horse Racing] A swelling that is found at the point of the hock and is caused by a bruise. It usually comes from kicking in horse vans or in stalls.
  • Capper [Poker] The chip used to cap the deck.
  • Capping a Bet [Roulette] Illegally adding more chips to a bet that has already won. It is a form of Past Posting.
  • Cappuccino. [Poker] Saying, often said by dealers, that means "The betting is capped."
  • Capsize [Sailing] When a boat falls over in the water so that is no longer right side up.
  • Capstan [Sailing] A rotating drum used to haul heavy lines and chains. Similar to a winch, but mounted vertically.
  • Captain [Sailing] The person who is in charge of a vessel and legally responsible for it and its occupants.
  • Captain, my Captain [Baseball] Former Notre Dame shortstop Craig Counsell and his father John are the only father/son combination to captain the same team sport at Notre Dame (John as a rightfielder in 1964, Craig in 1992).
  • Captive Finance Company [Motor Sports] A financial institution owned by a manufacturer. Examples include Chrysler Credit, Ford Motor Credit and GMAC.
  • Car [Sailing] A sliding fitting that attaches to a track allowing for the adjustment of blocks or other devices attached to the car.
  • Carb [Motor Sports] Short for carburetor.
  • Carbon Blade [Table Tennis] A blade with a layer of carbon between two wood surfaces.
  • Carbon Fiber [Motor Sports] Material used to produce components in racecars where strength and light weight are important. Carbon fiber is made by heating resin-impregnated rayon fabric in a very hot oven, molding it into shape, and hardening it to provide strength and durability. Has a much higher tensile strength than steel and weighs much less.
  • Carburetor [Motor Sports] Device that mixes air with fuel, delivering the mixture into the engine's combustion chambers. Only found on older vehicles. By the mid-1980s, new emissions standards led to the use of fuel-injection systems, which do not require frequent adjustment.
  • Card [Poker] 1) One of 52 (or 53) flat, rectangular objects, made usually of paper or plastic, with a uniform design on one side (the backs) and a representation of value (rank and suit) on the other; each card is either the joker, or one of the four suits (spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs) and 13 ranks (A, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, T, J, Q, K). A complete set of cards is called a deck. Paper cards are sometimes called pasteboards. Collectively, cards are sometimes called the Devil's playthings. 2) A player's bank. 3) Check cashing card.
  • Card Club [Poker] A card room.
  • Card Counter [Blackjack] A person who card counts by assigning numerical values to the cards ( see Card Counting )
  • Card Counting [Blackjack] A method of keeping track of the cards by assigning a value to certain cards in the deck to determine if the remaining cards in a deck or shoe favor the player or the dealer. For example, the hi-lo counting system assigns a value of plus one to cards 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 and minus one to tens, jacks, queens, kings and aces.
  • Card Dauber [Poker] Someone who marks cards.
  • Card Down [Poker] The situation in which a card has been dealt off the table or otherwise dropped to the floor, and a floor person must be called to pick up the card, because, in many casinos and card rooms, the house dealer is not permitted to retrieve the card, nor is a player. If a card falls on the floor, the dealer may announce, "Card down," and a floor person comes over to pick it up. Whether the card or cards that fell to the floor are still live or dead is subject to individual card room interpretation.
  • Card Eating [Blackjack] Using up cards quickly. A player may spread to more than one hand to accomplish this. For example, if the count is low, a player may spread to two or three hands at a minimum bet to hasten the shuffle.
  • Card Mechanic [Poker] A cheat who manipulates the deck.
  • Card Mob [Poker] Two or more cheaters working together in a card game.
  • Card Money [Poker] Money allocated by a gambler for playing at cards; bankroll.
  • Card Play [Poker] Playing at cards. Also, carding
  • Card Player [Poker] The premier magazine devoted to card playing.
  • Card Playing [Poker] Playing at cards. Also, carding, card play.
  • Card Rack [Poker] Someone who gets a lot of good hands; usually used facetiously or humorously. Sometimes called human card rack.
  • Card Room [Poker] 1) An establishment, usually open to the public, in which cards, usually poker, are played. 2) The section of a casino in which poker is played. 3) A room in a club devoted to card playing.
  • Card Sense [Poker] In a poker game, an acute awareness of the totality of what is going on, not narrowing your focus to just what's happening in your own hand. Card sense implies the ability to act on your observations, and to think on your feet. You must have imagination in playing your own hand, almost x-ray vision in being able to reconstruct opponents' hands. It is card sense that causes a player to play the same cards differently in different situations. A player without card sense usually plays the same cards the same in all situations.
  • Card Shark [Poker] An expert card player, usually a professional gambler. The term is not necessarily synonymous with cheater.
  • Card Smith [Poker] A card player, particular one who plays for a living.
  • Card Table [Poker] 1) Poker table. 2) Any table designed specially for playing cards. Different styles of tables are used for bridge, blackjack, baccarat, and poker, which itself has several types, depending on the specific game.
  • Card Wrench [Poker] A device to pry apart cards so that the card you caught will fit the hand; used humorously. If, in high draw poker, a player draws to 4-5-6-7 and catches a 9, he might say, "I need a card wrench to fix this hand."
  • Card-Holder [Poker] A player who seems to get more good hands than random chance would dictate.
  • Card-Hustler [Poker] Card thief.

D

  • D [Poker] Diamonds (the suit), in written text. Qd, for example, is the queen of diamonds.
  • D'alembert [Blackjack] A betting progression. It is a system where the bettor raises the bet one unit after each loss and lowers the bet one unit after each win. A series of numbers equidistant from one another is established, such as 1, 2, 3, 4. The player starts out by betting 1 unit. If he wins, he continues to bet one unit. If he loses, he cancels out the 1 and moves to the 2 and adds one unit to the last number, now having a series of 2, 3, 4, 5. At any point in the series where the player wins his bet, he reduces his bet by one unit. If he wins enough bets to return to a one unit bet, he starts over. If he loses during the series, he cancels out the last number he played and adds another number to the series. This system has many variations. It has never been proven to win, and in fact, cannot win in any game with a negative expectation.
  • D'alembert Betting System [Roulette] [1] A progressive system of betting where you increase your bet by one unit after a loss and decrease your bet by one unit after a win. [2] A progressive system of betting whereby two numbers are cancelled every time a previous bet is won, and one number, the total of two end numbers, is added whenever a previous bet is lost.
  • D-Rings [Bobsledding] Handles used to steer the sled; so named from their shape.
  • D.O.a. [Bowling] Short for "dead on arrival"; applied to a dead ball.
  • D.V.M. [Horse Racing] Doctor of Veterinary Medicine.
  • Da [Archery] An arrow, Western Tibet.
  • Da or Da2 [Blackjack] Abbreviations for double down on any first two cards.
  • Daab [Martial Arts] A Thai sword used in Krabi Krabong.
  • Daber [Bingo] Bingo daber is a bottle of ink that has a foam top on it, when you touch the bingo card with the foam tip it marks the square.
  • Dachi [Martial Arts] Stance.
  • Dacron [Sailing] A synthetic polyester material.
  • Daffy [Freestyle Skating] A mid-air split, in which the skier kicks one leg forward, the other backward, so that the front ski points straight up and the back ski points straight down.
  • Daffy Twister [Freestyle Skating] A daffy followed by a twister.
  • Daffy Twister Spread [Freestyle Skating] A sequence of a daffy, a twister, and a spread eagle.
  • Daggerboard [Sailing] Similar to a centerboard, except that it is raised vertically. Like a keel, daggerboards are used to prevent a sailboat being pushed sideways by the wind.
  • Dai Kissaki [Martial Arts] Enlarged point on a Japanese sword, a style more commonly found on swords from the 1700's.
  • Daikyu [Archery] A large bow, Japan.
  • Daily Double [Horse Racing] This type of wager is a wager on two races. You must select the winner of each race on one ticket, which you must purchase prior to the running of the first of the two races selected.
  • Daily Double Pool [Horse Racing] The sum total of all money bet on the daily double in a given two races.
  • Daily Game [Lotto] This can refer to any game where winners are determined once a day, but usually refers to a numbers game such as the "Daily 3" or "Daily 4" games played in many states.
  • Daily Racing Form [Horse Racing] A daily newspaper containing news, past performance data and handicapping information. Do not use definite article "The" when describing According to Daily Racing Form,...
  • Daily Tote Double [General] A double event in the Totalisator pool operated on the third and fifth races at any meeting. Backer has to forecast, by name, the winner of each of the two races. Unnamed selections, such as favourites, are not accepted.
  • Daily Tote Treble [General] A Totalisator pool operated usually on the second, fourth and sixth races at a meeting. Backer has to forecast, by name, the winner of each of the three races. Unnamed selections, such as favourites, are not accepted.
  • Daily Triple [Horse Racing] A wager where the bettor must select the winner of three consecutive races.
  • Daisan [Martial Arts] The completed drawing phase of kyudo.
  • Daisho [Martial Arts] "Big and small." Two swords, one long and the other short, worn by the samurai class in feudal Japan.
  • Daishô [Martial Arts] (Japanese) Translated: Big and Small or long and short... The combination of the two swords of the Samurai. The Katana (the long sword) and the Wakizashi (the short one).
  • Daito [Martial Arts] A long sword, whose cutting edge, was over 24 inches in length, as contrasted with such shorter swords as the wakizashi (18 inches.)
  • Dam [Horse Racing] The female parent, or mother, of a horse.
  • Dam's Sire (Broodmare Sire) [Horse Racing] The sire of a broodmare. Used in reference to the maternal grandsire of a foal.
  • Dame [Poker] Queen (the card).
  • Damper [Motor Sports] A device which reduces vibration.
  • Damsire (Broodmare Sire) [Horse Racing] The sire of a broodmare.
  • Dan [Martial Arts] The Korean word for degree, usually used as a suffix with a number prefix to indicate a practitioner's rank, as in shodan. First dan is the lowest degree and 10th dan is the highest.
  • Dance Every Set [Poker] Play every hand, or appear or claim to.
  • Dance Floor [Golf] The putting green.
  • Dancing Queen [Bingo] 17
  • Danforth Anchor [Sailing] A brand of lightweight anchor. It has pivoting flukes that dig into the ground as tension is placed on the anchor. It does not have a stock.
  • Danger Position [Wrestling] A position in which a wrestler's back is at less than a right angle to the mat.
  • Dangerous Play [Field Hockey] An action that could result in injury to any player, including the player performing the action. It includes an illegal tackle, a raised ball, and playing the ball while lying on the ground.
  • Danjun [Martial Arts] Part of the body just below the navel which is believed to be the source of ki.
  • Danny La Rue [Bingo] 52
  • Dark [Poker] 1) Without looking at your cards. "I'll open dark." "He made a dark bet." 2) Check without looking; always followed by it. "I'll dark it" means "I have not looked at my cards and I shall check" and implies that the speaker is drawing to a powerhouse (in high draw poker) or to a must-call hand (in lowball; for example, an 8, but not a must-bet hand) so you better not try to bluff him, but in actuality usually means he doesn't want you to bet.
  • Dark Bay or Brown [Horse Racing] A horse color that ranges from brown with areas of tan on the shoulders, head and flanks, to a dark brown, with tan areas seen only in the flanks and/or muzzle. The mane, tail and lower portions of the legs are always black unless white markings are present.
  • Dark Bet [Poker] A blind bet.
  • Dark Day [Horse Racing] A day when no live racing is scheduled.
  • Dark Horse [Horse Racing] An underrated animal that wins or has good prospects of winning.
  • Dark Match [Wrestling] (noun) A match that takes place either before or after a televised event begins or ends and is not shown on TV with the rest of the matches.
  • Darken [Poker] Bet without looking at your cards. "I'll open dark." "He made a dark bet."
  • Darlington Stripe [Motor Sports] A streak of scraped-off paint that appears on the right side of a car, from having made light contact with the outside wall. The term originated at Darlington back in the '60s, when the track had Armco for its retaining walls. Darlington has peculiarly-designed corners, and in the days of narrower tires, the fastest way for Stock cars to get through turn 2 (which was at the time turn 4) was to get right up next to the Armco, actually touching it, so that the corrugated metal rail produced a characteristic pair of scrape marks down the right side of the car. Richard Petty once said of Darlington: "Turn 4 would be perfect, if we were allowed to mount roller skates on the side of the car."
  • Darrell Survey [Golf] Organization that counts and publishes equipment usage on professional golf tours. The Survey counts club and ball type and brand, type of clothing and shoes used, etc. The information is published and is made available to equipment companies and golfers by subscription only.
  • Darth Vader [Poker] In hold 'em, the two black fours (the "dark force") as one's first two cards.
  • Darts [Bowling] See arrows.
  • Das [Blackjack] An abbreviation for a rule that allows the player to double after splits. See double after split.
  • Dash [Horse Racing] A sprint race, versus a distance race.
  • Dasher [Ice Hockey] The small ledge at the top of the boards.
  • Data Card [Skydiving] Every parachute carries a data card with information on the reserve parachute, including type, last date packed, owner, serial number, etc.
  • Daub [Poker] Markings put on cards with paint, ink, or some other fluid. Also called cosmetics.
  • Dauber [Bingo] An ink marker sold in a small plastic bottle for the purpose of marking off numbers on "flimsy" sheets. See definition of flimsy.
  • David [Poker] The king of spades. Probably comes from the Biblical King David
  • Davit [Sailing] A device that projects beyond the side of the boat to raise objects from the water. Typically a single davit is used on the bow of a vessel to raise an anchor, and a pair are used on the side or stern of the vessel to raise a dinghy.
  • Dawn Patrol [Golf] Golfers who tee off early to avoid the heavy traffic.
  • Day [Poker] One of the three shifts in a 24-hour card room or casino, the shift between graveyard and swing. Day shift usually starts anywhere between 8 and 10 am and ends eight hours later. "When do you work?" "I'm on days."
  • Day Shift [Poker] One of the three shifts in a 24-hour card room or casino, the shift between graveyard and swing. Day shift usually starts anywhere between 8 and 10 am and ends eight hours later.
  • Day/Night [Baseball] Officially, night games in the National League are those that start after 5:00 pm, while night games in the AL begin after 6:00 pm. Therefore, a game at 5:30 in Yankee Stadium is a day game while one in Shea Stadium at the same time is a night game. We avoid this silliness by calling all games starting after 5:00pm night games.
  • Dayang [Martial Arts] The female black belt ranks in the Filipino art arnis de mano.
  • Daybeacon, Daymark [Sailing] A navigational aid visible during the day. In the United States and Canada, square red daybeacons should be kept on the right and triangular green daybeacons should be kept on the left when returning from a larger to smaller body of water. Also see can and nun buoys.
  • Days [Poker] One of the three shifts in a 24-hour card room or casino, the shift between graveyard and swing. Day shift usually starts anywhere between 8 and 10 am and ends eight hours later. "When do you work?" "I'm on days."
  • Daysailer [Sailing] A small boat intended to be used only for short sails or racing.
  • Dayshape [Sailing] Black diamond, ball, and cone shapes hoisted on vessels during the day to indicate restricted movement ability or type. For example three balls means aground.
  • Daytime Running Lights (Drl) [Motor Sports] These lights come on whenever the vehicle is turned on; they make the vehicle more visible to other drivers. Mandatory in Canada and standard equipment on many vehicles sold in the United States.
  • Daytona [Golf] A game for 4 players divided into 2 sides. The scores of a side for each hole are combined to form a number of points; if one plyaer has a score of par or better then the lower score of the team is placed first - if the scores on a par 3 are 3 and 4 then the team score is 34. But if the best score for the hole is over par then the higher must be placed first - if scores on a par 3 are 4 and 5, the team score is 54. The side with the lower number of points for the round wins.
  • Db [Greyhound Racing] Daytona Beach, Florida
  • Dd [Blackjack] 1. An abbreviation commonly used by posters to describe a Double-Deck game. 2. The acronym for Double Down.
  • De [Blackjack] The acronym for Double Exposure, a variety of blackjack in which both dealer cards are dealt face up and ties lose.
  • De Ashi Barai [Martial Arts] Forward foot sweep
  • De Dion Axle [Motor Sports] The nineteenth-century axle principle of Count de Dion. The wheels tied by a transverse tube curved to clear the final drive unit rigidly mounted to the car's chassis frame. Drive to the wheels is by universally jointed half shafts. The tube moves vertically on a slide to allow the wheels to rise and fall independently. General use was dropped in 1914, but still is used on many sports and racing cars.
  • De-Arch [Skydiving] To flatten out or reverse one's body position from the normal arched position. A de-arch results in a slower fall rate than an arch.
  • Dead [Poker] A dead card is a card that is no longer available to help you. In seven card stud, for example, a pair of kings in the hole is less strong if the two remaining kings are two other players' door cards, and therefore dead.
  • Dead Ahead [Sailing] A position directly in front of the vessel.
  • Dead Astern [Sailing] A position directly behind the vessel.
  • Dead Ball [Basketball] Any ball that is not live; occurs after each successful field goal or free-throw attempt, after any official's whistle or if the ball leaves the court; it stops play which is then resumed by a jump ball, throw-in or free-throw.
  • Dead Before [Sailing] Running with the wind directly behind the boat.
  • Dead Blind [Poker] 1) A blind bet, the holder of which cannot raise unless the pot is already raised. 2) A blind that the winner of a pot does not get to keep; instead, he must put it back in the next pot. A winner blind is an example of a dead blind.
  • Dead Button Rule [Poker] The rule that the button doesn't move if the small blind position leaves.
  • Dead Card [Poker] A card no longer legally playable.
  • Dead Draw [Poker] See Drawing Dead.
  • Dead Game [Poker] A game full of mostly house players (that is, with few or even no live players).
  • Dead Hand [Poker] A hand no longer legally playable, due to some irregularity.
  • Dead Handle [Curling] A stone that either has no turn or loses its rotation during travel.
  • Dead Heat [Horse Racing] A situation in which the judges cannot separate two or more horses when judging the outcome of a race. These horses are declared as having crossed the finish line at the exact same time. If the position the horses finished in was first, they are said to have dead-heated, if the position the horses finished in was second or third for instance, they are said to have dead-heated for second or third. Triple dead-heats (where three horses cross the line at the same time) do occur, but are quite rare.
  • Dead in the Pot [Poker] Having no way of winning a particular pot.
  • Dead Man's Hand [Poker] 1) Two pair, aces and eights. 2) The black aces, black eights and nine of diamonds. The hand Wild Bill Hickok was holding when he was shot to death.
  • Dead Money [Poker] Money contributed to the pot by players who have folded.
  • Dead Puck [Ice Hockey] A puck that flies out of the rink or that a player has caught in his hand.
  • Dead Reckoning [Sailing] A method of determining position by making an educated guess based on last known position, speed and currents.
  • Dead Spider [Skydiving] Slang for de-arch.
  • Dead Spread [Poker] A Dead game.
  • Dead Table [Blackjack] A table with no players. "You can't go home until there is one more dead table."
  • Dead Time [Water Polo] The time when the ball is dead, between the whistle for a foul and the restarting of play and the clock. Compare live time.
  • Dead Track [Horse Racing] A racing surface that lacks resiliency.
  • Dead Wood [Bowling] Pins that remain on the lane or in the gutter after being knocked down. They are removed in ten-pin, but left in place in both candlepin and duckpin bowling.
  • Dead Wreck. [Poker] Red deck. This is a spoonerism that you hear card room clowns use when they ask the house for a new deck.
  • Dead-Ball Foul [Basketball] A foul committed while the clock is stopped and the ball is not in play.
  • Dead-Ball Line [Rugby] One of two lines marking the lengthwise boundaries of the field, located at the back of the in-goal area, a maximum of 22 meters from the try-line.
  • Dead-Heat [Horse Racing] When two or more race animals reach the finish line simultaneously.
  • Dead-Time Foul [Water Polo] Any foul that's committed during dead time.
  • Deadlight [Sailing] Fixed ports that do not open, placed in the deck or cabin to admit light.
  • Deadness [Croquet] When a strikers ball hits another ball, the striker cannot use that ball until going through the next wicket. The striker is dead on the other ball, after taking the croquet shot.
  • Deadness Board [Croquet] Board used to keep track of deadness throughout the game. (see: Equipment).
  • Deadrise [Sailing] The measurement of the angle between the bottom of a boat and its widest beam. A vessel with a 0ş deadrise has a flat bottom, high numbers indicate deep V shaped hulls.
  • Deadwood [Poker] The discards; used cards out of play. "Push the deadwood. It's my turn to deal." Sometimes called timber.
  • Deal [Poker] To deal is to give out the cards during a hand. The person who does this is called the dealer. At most public card rooms, a dealer is hired for this purpose (and for generally running the game). At most private games, players take turns dealing.
  • Deal a Slug [Poker] Deal from a deck with a slug in it, in the manner described under slug, or with the slug at the bottom, and the dealer deals from the bottom as required to place those cards into his, a confederate's, or a victim's hand.
  • Deal Around [Blackjack] To deliberately not give cards to a player even though he has a bet in place. "If he swears at you again deal around him."
  • Deal Bottoms [Poker] Perform a cheating maneuver in which a card manipulator deals cards from the bottom of the deck.
  • Deal in [Poker] Specifically include a particular player while dealing. "Deal me in. I'm just getting up for a cup of coffee. I'll be back before the cards are out." (He's usually not back in time.)
  • Deal Off [Poker] Take the deal and then leave the table. In some games, a player must go through the entire set of blinds in each round in which he has a hand. If he deals off, he can come back in any position, or, in some clubs, in any position only in the round in which he dealt off.
  • Deal Out [Poker] 1) Skip a player while dealing. "Deal me out; I have to go to the bathroom." 2) Play the last hand or the last round of a session, usually used only in private games
  • Deal Seconds [Poker] Perform a cheating maneuver in which a card manipulator deals cards not from the top of the deck, but from directly beneath the top card.
  • Deal Yourself [Poker] Deal-yourself game, in which each player in turn physically distributes the cards. "We have no dealers; it's deal yourself."
  • Deal-Yourself Game [Poker] A game in which each player in turn physically distributes the cards.
  • Dealer [Craps] Each of the two Dealers at a Craps table is responsible for all the bets made on his half of the table. Whenever you want to make a free odds, place, or lay bet in a casino, you should give the money to the dealer at your end of the table and he will make the bet for you.
  • Dealer Advantage [Poker] In a draw poker game, before the draw, the dealer gets information about how everyone bets before it is his turn to act, at the draw, about how many cards they take, and, again, after the draw, about how they bet. In hold 'em-type games in which the betting each round proceeds from the dealer's left and around, the dealer finds out how each player acts on his hand before himself having to act. This positional edge is called dealer advantage.
  • Dealer Blind [Poker] 1) In a three-blind traveling blind game game, the blind put up by the player in the dealer position. 2) The player who is in the dealer blind position.
  • Dealer Button [Poker] In all flop games, a small disk used to signify the player in the last position if a house dealer is used; a buck.
  • Dealer Charges [Motor Sports] Any extra charges for additional services or products sold by the dealer such as rust-proofing or extended warranties.
  • Dealer Control [Poker] A facetious term used by a dealer who wins a large pot to imply that he won by "controlling" the cards (jokingly implying that he is cheating).
  • Dealer Edge [Poker] In a draw poker game, before the draw, the dealer gets information about how everyone bets before it is his turn to act, at the draw, about how many cards they take, and, again, after the draw, about how they bet. In hold 'em-type games in which the betting each round proceeds from the dealer's left and around, the dealer finds out how each player acts on his hand before himself having to act. This positional edge is called dealer edge.
  • Dealer Holdback [Motor Sports] Also known as "pack." Manufacturer refund to a dealer after a vehicle is sold. Usually a percentage (2 to 3%) of the MSRP.
  • Dealer Incentive [Motor Sports] A limited time discount offered by the manufacturer to a dealership.
  • Dealer Incentives [Motor Sports] A cash refund or attractive lease or loan rate offered by an automotive manufacturer toward the sale/purchase of a new vehicle.
  • Dealer Invoice Price [Motor Sports] Also called dealer cost. The amount the dealer pays for a car or truck. Deducted from this price may be a dealer incentive, which is a set discount offered for a limited period of time, or a dealer holdback, which is a percentage of the vehicle's wholesale price.
  • Dealer Preparation Fee [Motor Sports] Extra charges for getting the car ready.
  • Dealer School [Blackjack] A tuition-charging training facility which teaches students the theory, standard methods, and rudimentary practice of dealing one or more of the games offered by a typical casino.
  • Dealer Sticker Price [Motor Sports] The base price, or the price on the Monroney sticker, plus the suggested retail price of dealer-installed options, dealer preparation, and add-ons such as undercoating.
  • Dealer's Choice [Poker] A game in which each dealer, in turn, chooses the type of poker to be played.
  • Dealer-Advantage Game [Poker] Any poker game with dealer advantage, such as draw poker or a replacement high-low stud game in which players replace unwanted cards sequentially starting to the left of the dealer.

E

  • E [Baseball] Errors
  • E-Fed(Fed) [Wrestling] The actual promotion that your wrestler belongs to.
  • E-Wrestler(Wrestler) [Wrestling] The character that you use in E-Wrestling.
  • E-Wrestling [Wrestling] Fantasy Professional Wrestling
  • E.O. [Poker] 1) Short for Early Out. 2) In a card room, being permitted to have one's last break from work at the end of the shift, thus allowing the employee (usually a dealer) to leave early. If breaks are 20 minutes, having early out permits the dealer to get off 20 minutes before the shift is over, that is, before the other dealers are done. Often called E.O. 3) Leaving a shift early because there is not enough business to support all the dealers. The shift boss may say, "Who wants early out?" A dealer who wants to go play (cards) may volunteer.
  • E.R.C. [Golf] The most famous of the non-conforming flexible-face drivers. Manufactured by Callaway Golf, E.R.C. are the initials of the company’s founder, Ely Reese Callaway.
  • E.T. [Motor Sports] Elapsed time.
  • Each Way [General] This describes a transaction that is effectively two bets in which equal stakes are laid 1) on the selection coming first, and 2) the selection being placed, i.e. coming second, third or fourth, depending on the race. When the punter asks for, say, "Ł10 each way" this is actually two bets, at ten pound stakes each, and the bookmaker would ask for a twenty pound deposit.
  • Each Way Chance [General] A horse which has a good chance of winning or finishing in second or third place in a race. Because it's not considered to be a sure thing, punters will back an each way chance for a win and a place, which means they will get a return if it finishes in the top three.
  • Each Way Double [Horse Racing] Two separate bets of a win double and a place double.
  • Each Way Odds [Horse Racing] Four to one ( now $5.00 ) with the bookmakers because if the horse does not win but finishes second or third, the punter's wager is refunded in full and the punter does not lose on the race.
  • Each Way Single [Horse Racing] Two bets. The first is for the selection to win; the second for it to be placed (each way).
  • Eagle [Golf] Two strokes under the designated par for a hole. Also used as a verb, as in, "He eagled the ninth hole."
  • Ear [Poker] To bend the corner of a card so it can be recognized from the back by a cheater.
  • Ear Tattoos [Greyhound Racing] A greyhound's right ear tattoo represents the month, year and tattoo order of your dogs litter. The last number before the letter is his year of birth, the first one or two numbers is his month of birth. The letter represents the order in which the litter was tattooed (It does not mean the order of birth).
  • Earhole [General] The price of 6/4.
  • Early Apex [Motor Sports] A point on the inside of a turn before the geometric apex. See geometric apex.
  • Early Bet [Poker] The first bet in a stud game, often set artificially low, that is, lower than the normal betting limits for the game, and often a forced bet, one made by, for example, in seven-card stud, the lowest face-up card showing. In a $2-$4 game, the lowest face-up card on the first round (at the point that two face-down cards and one face-up card have been dealt) might be required to make a 50-cent early bet. Sometimes called bring-in bet.
  • Early Bird Game [Bingo] A bingo game played before the start of a "session." But sometimes the Early Bird game is merely the first game of the session. The first game of a session is more commonly known as a Warm Up.
  • Early Flash [Golf] Was near the front in early stages of race.
  • Early Foot [Horse Racing] Good speed at the start of a race.
  • Early Foundation [Bowling] A strike in the eighth frame. See also foundation.
  • Early Initiation [Freestyle Skating] Beginning a turn early.
  • Early Out [Poker] 1) In a card room, being permitted to have one's last break from work at the end of the shift, thus allowing the employee (usually a dealer) to leave early. If breaks are 20 minutes, having early out permits the dealer to get off 20 minutes before the shift is over, that is, before the other dealers are done. Often called E.O. 2) Leaving a shift early because there is not enough business to support all the dealers. The shift boss may say, "Who wants early out?" A dealer who wants to go play (cards) may volunteer.
  • Early Position [Poker] A position on a round of betting in which you must act before most of the other players.
  • Early Surrender [Blackjack] Player may give up or surrender after receiving first two cards but before dealer checks for an Ace in the hole. If surrendered, only 50% of bet is lost, instead of entire sum. Excellent method for controlling player losses and therefore not allowed in most casinos.
  • Early Termination [Motor Sports] Ending the lease before the contracted time. May be involuntary, due to theft or accident.
  • Early Termination Charge [Motor Sports] Additional fee charged when a lease is ended before the agreed-upon term. Often represents a substantial penalty.
  • Early Trouble [Golf] Encountered bumping in first half of race.
  • Early-Out [Blackjack] Being allowed to leave work before the end of the shift. "I need an early-out to go to the dentist."
  • Earmuffs [Horse Racing] A piece of equipment that covers a horse's ears to prevent it from hearing distracting sounds.
  • Earn [General] The practical hold percentage
  • Earned Premium [Motor Sports] The portion of the premium which is already paid from an expired policy term.
  • Earned Run [Baseball] A run scored on a hit, walk or steal, without benefit from a defensive error on the play.
  • Earned Run Average [Baseball] The number of earned runs (runs scored without the benefit of an error) that pitcher allows, multiplied by nine (the number of innings in a regulation game) and divided by the actual number of innings pitched. Ex. Pitcher allows 5 earned runs in 6 innings. ERA = 5 X 9 = 45 / 6 = 7.50 ERA.
  • Earned Run Average (Era) [Baseball] Represents the average number of runs given up by a pitcher during a game if that pitcher pitched all nine innings. Formula: (Earned Runs x 9) / (Innings Pitched)
  • Earned Runs (Er) [Baseball] Any run that is directly attributable to the pitcher.
  • Earnings [Horse Racing] The amount of purse money earned by a horse in pari-mutuel races. Earnings are usually categorized by earnings in a given year versus lifetime earnings.
  • Ease [Sailing] To slowly loosen a line while maintaining control, such as when loosening the sails.
  • Ease the Sheets [Sailing] To loosen the lines that control the sails.
  • Ease Up [Horse Racing] To slow a horse's stride, sparing exertion.
  • Eased [Horse Racing] Chart caller's assessment of a horse that is being deliberately slowed by the jockey to prevent injury or harm to the horse.
  • Easily [Horse Racing] A horse running or winning without being pressed by the jockey or opposition.
  • East [Sailing] One of the 4 cardinal compass points. East is at 90° on a compass card.
  • East Coast Line [General] Mainly used in hockey, which has a split-goal line e.g. - NY Rangers (1 - 1 1/2) favorite over the Vancouver Canucks as opposed to goal spread plus money line (-1/2 -180)
  • East Wind, Easterly Wind [Sailing] A wind coming from the east.
  • Eastern Conference [Ice Hockey] The renamed Wales Conference beginning with the 1993-94 season which contains the Northeast and Atlantic Divisions, formerly called the Adams and Patrick Divisions.
  • Eastern Grip [Tennis] Forehand grip. Describes a grip which allows the ball to be hit easily ahead of the body and the racquet swung all the way through.
  • Easy Money [Poker] Easy pickings in a poker game; money won from inexperienced players.
  • Easy Out [Golf] Threaded steel rod inserted into a shaft broken off at the hosel. The threads lock onto the shaft, making it removable after the application of heat. See also “Shaft Extractor.”
  • Easy Way [Craps] The roll of a 4, 6, 8 or 10 where the dice are not pairs.
  • Eb [Greyhound Racing] Ebro, Florida
  • Ebb, Ebb Tide [Sailing] The falling tide when the water moves out to the sea and the water level lowers.
  • Ebira, Yebira [Archery] A Japanese quiver hung from the left shoulder.
  • Ecb [General] Emirates Cricket Board
  • Echelon [Cycling] A diagonal line of riders, in which each rider is downwind of the rider immediately ahead. It's a cooperative group, since each rider takes a turn in front, fighting the wind while the other riders are shielded from it.
  • Echo [Blackjack] A response from the floor person when the dealer makes an announcement. When the dealer hears an "echo" the floor person is aware of the transaction and has given his approval. It keeps the dealer from turning around to look for the floor person and exposing the dealer tray unnecessarily.
  • Echo Sounder [Sailing] An electrical fish finder or depth sounder that uses sound echoes to locate the depth of objects in water. It does so by timing the sound pulses.
  • Eclectic [Golf] An individual stroke play game comprising a defined number of rounds. At the end of the series each of the competitors records his best score of the series at each hole.
  • Eclipse Award [Horse Racing] Thoroughbred racing's year-end awards, honoring the top horses and humans in several categories. They honor the great 18th century racehorse and sire, Eclipse, who was undefeated in 18 career starts and sired the winners of 344 races. The Eclipse Awards are sponsored by the Thoroughbred Racing Associations, Daily Racing Form and National Turf Writers Association. They were first given out in 1971; previously, separate year-end champions were named by Daily Racing Form (beginning in 1936) and the Thoroughbrd Racing Assoications (beginning in 1950). Any Eclipse Award winner is referred to as a "champion." See Appendix for a list of Eclipse Award winners.
  • Economy Run [Motor Sports] Driving slower to conserve fuel. Some series cars can actually manipulate air/fuel levels (less fuel, more air) to run "lean" and conserve fuel.
  • Ecpw [Wrestling] East Coast Professional Wrestling
  • Ecu [Motor Sports] Engine Control Unit or Black Box.
  • Ecw [Wrestling] Extreme Championship Wrestling
  • Ecwa [Wrestling] East Coast Wrestling Association
  • Eddy [Canoeing] A relatively calm area, away from the main current, often near the shore. Upstream gates are often located in eddies, so that the paddler will not have to fight the current's full force.
  • Edge [Figure Skating] Each skate blade has two edges, one on each side of the groove in the center, the inside edge and the outside edge, and each edge is divided into two sections, forward and back. On most maneuvers, specific edges are supposed to be used. For example, the specifications for the Axel call for a takeoff from the forward inside edge and a landing on the back outside edge of the opposite foot.
  • Edge Bet [Poker] The bet made by the edge, often a forced bet.
  • Edge Jump [Figure Skating] Any jump on which the skater takes off from an edge of the skating foot without assistance from the other foot; for example, the Axel, loop, and Salchow.
  • Edge Out [Poker] Barely beat another hand.
  • Edge Ticket [Keno] A ticket with the 32 numbers marked that make up the outer edge of the ticket.
  • Edge Work [Poker] Markings (or cosmetics) put on the borders of cards with paint, ink, or some other fluid, so that a thief can read the ranks (and sometimes suits) of the cards from the back or side.
  • Edge-Set [Skiing] Tilting the skis quickly onto their uphill edges whilst across the fall-line, to produce a sudden braking action. Often used to create a platform from which the skier can spring into the next turn.
  • Edging [Skiing] Tilting one or both skis onto either edge, usually to prevent slipping.
  • Edo [Martial Arts] (Japanese) Ancient japanese word used for the name of the city Tôkyô during the Tokugawa period (1615-1868). Edo means "Mouth of river" and was a small fisherman's village for a long time.
  • Eec [Motor Sports] The Electronic Engine Control unit or colloquially referred to as the Black Box.
  • Eee (Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis) [Horse Racing] One of several different types of encephalomyelitis that are extremely contagious, causing sickness and death in horses by affecting the central nervous system. EEE is spread by mosquitoes and can affect humans. Can be prevented by annual vaccinations.
  • Effective Loft [Golf] He actual face angle at impact created through the relationship of loft and face angle. For example, if a driver has a measured loft of 8 degrees and has a two-degree open face, its effective loft will be @6 degrees.
  • Effective Odds [Poker] The ratio of the total amount of money you expect to win if you make your hand to the total amount of bets you will have to call to continue from the present round of betting to the end of the hand.
  • Eggbeater [Synchro Swimming] Rapid rotary action of the legs, which supports and propels the upper body while in an upright position, leaving the arms free.
  • Eight [Rowing] A sweep-oar boat with eight rowers and a coxswain.
  • Eight and Blank [Bingo] 80
  • Eight(Een) Ks is Enough [Baseball] Current Irish senior RHP Aaron Heilman (Logansport, Ind.) tied a BIG EAST record and came just shy of the Notre Dame record with an 18-strikeout effort in a 3-1, 10-inning win at West Virginia on April 15, 2000 (the game was scheduled for seven innings). Heilman seemingly became stronger as the game wore on, spotting his tough slider with regularity while delivering a fastball that still touched 91 miles-per-hour in the lategoing. He retired 15 straight batters from the 5th-10th innings and struck out 10 of the final 12 he faced, including seven straight before yielding a single with two outs in the 10th. Kevin Olkowski-who had two of his team's six hits-went down swinging on three pitches to end the game. Heilman's 18 Ks tied the BIG EAST record set by Seton Hall's Jason Grilli in a 7-2 win over Connecticut in '97 (Grilli went on to become the fourth pick in the '97 draft, by the San Francisco Giants). Frank Carpin is the only other Irish pitcher ever to record 18-plus Ks in a game, with 19 in a 10-inning win over Indiana on April 16, 1958 (12-10). Heilman's memorable day included just two walks, with 11 groundball outs and one flyout. All nine Mountaineers starters-plus reserve Matt McGee-were K victims.
  • Eight, Skate, and Donate [Poker] Describing a (usually) no-limit game whose minimum bet is $8.
  • Eight-Iron [Golf] An iron club giving distance of between 115-150 yards. Also called a pitching niblick.
  • Eight-to-go [Poker] Describing a (usually) no-limit game whose minimum bet is $8.
  • Eight-to-Skate [Poker] Describing a (usually) no-limit game whose minimum bet is $8.
  • Eight-Way Hand [Poker] 1) In the 53-card deck, the joker plus three to a straight with two "holes," so that any of eight cards makes it a straight. For example, 3-4-7-joker of mixed suits can be made into a straight by drawing any 5 or 6, of which there are eight altogether. 2) In the 52-card deck, Open-ended straight.
  • Eight-Way Straight [Poker] 1) In the 53-card deck, the joker plus three to a straight with two "holes," so that any of eight cards makes it a straight. For example, 3-4-7-joker of mixed suits can be made into a straight by drawing any 5 or 6, of which there are eight altogether. 2) In the 52-card deck, Open-ended straight.
  • Eighter from Decatur [Craps] Betting that the next roll will be the total sum of 8 (4&4).
  • Eighth [Horse Racing] 1/8 = 1 furlong = 220 yards = 600 feet.
  • Eighth Pole [Horse Racing] The colored pole at the inside rail 1 furlong from the finish wire.
  • Eighty-Six [Blackjack] 1. To exclude a person from having any more alcoholic beverage. 2. Sometimes to completely expel a customer from the casino. Also "Barred".
  • Eiph [Horse Racing] Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. See bleeder.
  • Eishin Ryu [Martial Arts] The original style of iaijutsu that embraces numerous kata and is combat oriented.
  • Either Way Up [Bingo] 69
  • Eku [Martial Arts] "Oar." A weapon developed by Okinawan farmers. Today it is a training weapon common to Okinawan karate.
  • El Paso. [Poker] I pass.
  • Ela (Da) [Archery] The Nicobar harpoon arrow.
  • Elapsed Time [Motor Sports] An elapsed time, or e.t., is the time it takes a vehicle to travel from the starting line to the finish line. Turbocharger: An exhaust driven intake air compressor. (see supercharger)
  • Elastomer™ [Golf] Material used in the formation of golf balls, particularly by Titleist™. Also, a variety of material used in the manufacture of Winn™ grips.
  • Elastomer™ Ring [Golf] A piece of polymer material used to surround the inner cavity of certain models of irons, notably Lynx Black Cat™ models. The ring is used for cosmetic and acoustic purposes according to Lynx.
  • Elbowing [Basketball] Vigorous or excessive swinging of the elbows. Elbowing is a violation even if there's no contact with an opponent. If there is contact, it's a personal foul, and contact made above shoulder level can result in ejection from the game.
  • Elder Hand [Poker] Player immediately to the left of the dealer in games that use an automatic betting scheme. Sometimes the player in that position is the last to bet before the draw, which is equivalent to the situation involving an under-the-gun blind.
  • Eldest Hand [Poker] Player immediately to the left of the dealer in games that use an automatic betting scheme. Sometimes the player in that position is the last to bet before the draw, which is equivalent to the situation involving an under-the-gun blind.
  • Electric Screw Extractor [Golf] A tool with two electrically charged electrodes that, when placed in contact with a soleplate or face insert screw, makes the screw easier to remove due to its heat melting the epoxy holding the screw in place.
  • Electric Vehicles (Ev) [Motor Sports] Vehicles powered by electricity, generally using a rechargeable battery.
  • Electrical Apparatus [Fencing] The equipment that registers valid hits through a connection with the fencers' body wires. Red and green lights signal valid hits. In foil, a white light signals a non-valid hit.
  • Electrical Fault [Motor Sports] When a connecting rod comes through the block and knocks the distributor off.
  • Electrical System [Motor Sports] In electric ignition internal-combustion engines, those components required to convert the electricity produced by the generator into a high-voltage spark for the plugs. Includes: generator or alternator, points, condenser, coil, distributor and spark plugs plus wiring.
  • Electronic Control Module (Ecm) [Motor Sports] The computer that controls the engine's fuel and emissions systems. Among the devices it controls is the idle air control, or IAC, which regulates the idle speed in fuel-injected engines. Also called the Electronic Control Unit (ECU).
  • Electronic Fuel Injection System [Motor Sports] Injects fuel into the engine's cylinders with electronic control to time and meter the fuel flow.
  • Electronic Navigation [Sailing] The use of echo sounders, radio, and various electronic satellite and land based position finders to determine a boat's location.
  • Electronic Valve Timing (Evt) [Motor Sports] System in which a computer controls the timing of the opening and closing of cylinder valves.
  • Elevator [Poker] 1) A cheating move during shuffling of cards, in which the dealer offers the pack to be cut, but then restores the deck to its original sequence. 2) A form of widow game found only in home games, in which each player is dealt five down cards, as in draw, followed by a betting round, and then seven cards are arranged in two columns of three, with each turned face up one at a time, plus one card between the two columns (the elevator), turned up last, which can move up or down such that a player can use three across from either column, or either of the three diagonals formed when the elevator is in the middle. Each card exposed is followed by another betting round. Each player makes the best hand possible by using any combination from his five and up to three from the widow in the manner described. Some play that each player may use only two cards from his hand and must use three from the widow. 3) The movable widow card described in definition 2.
  • Elevator the Cut [Poker] A cheating move during shuffling of cards, in which the dealer offers the pack to be cut, but then restores the deck to its original sequence.
  • Eligible [Horse Racing] Qualified to start in a race, according to conditions.
  • Eligible Receiver [Football] A player allowed by the rules to catch a forward pass; all offensive players are eligible except linemen and the quarterback, who must notify the referee if they wish to become eligible and stand at least one yard behind the line of scrimmage before the snap.
  • Elilminations [Motor Sports] After qualifying, vehicles race two at a time, resulting in one winner and one loser. Winners continue to race in tournament-style competition until one remains. (Drag racing)
  • Eliminations [Motor Sports] After qualifying, vehicles race two at a time, resulting in one winner and one loser. Winners continue to race in tournament-style competition until one remains. Two-step: An electronic device enables the driver to program a specific rpm range for the launch.
  • Elk River [Poker] A hand with three 10s.
  • Elliptical Parachute [Skydiving] Like a Square except elliptical rather than rectangular. These Canopies are far more radical than Square parachutes doing 360-degree turns in 1-2 seconds, with the Skydiver and Parachute parallel to the ground. There are variations between Square and Elliptical, some called Semi-Elliptical.
  • Elmer. [Poker] Sucker. (Rhyming slang, from "Elmer Tucker.")
  • Em [Blackjack] An abbreviation for "E-Mail".
  • Embujo [Martial Arts] A place of exhibition or athletic performances where martial arts events are often staged.
  • Emergancy Tiller [Sailing] A tiller that is designed to be used in the event that wheel steering fails.
  • Emergency [Greyhound Racing] Replacement runner in a race when an official acceptor is scratched prior to a particular time before the race.
  • Emery Cake [Golf] Type of compound used, along with an unstitched buffing wheel, to remove deep nicks and scratches from a steel surface. It is considered to have heavy cutting action.
  • Emll [Wrestling] Empresa Mexicana de la Lucha Libre
  • Empi [Martial Arts] Elbow (also Enpi)
  • Empty Net [Ice Hockey] A net that's unprotected, because the goalie is out of position or because he's off the ice in favor of an extra skater.
  • Empty Net Goal [Ice Hockey] A goal scored when the net is not guarded by the goalie, usually because he's been pulled to get an extra skater on the ice.
  • Empty-Net Goal [Ice Hockey] A goal scored against a team that has pulled the goalie.
  • En Finale [Fencing] Descriptive of a parry made at the last possible instant.
  • En Garde [Fencing] Also On Guard; the fencing position; the stance that fencers assume when preparing to fence.
  • En Plein [Roulette] French term for the Straight-up Bet.
  • En Prison Rule [Roulette] When the outcome is zero, some casinos will allow the players to either take back half his bet or leave the bet (in prison) for another spin. In the second case, if the following spin the outcome is again zero, then the whole bet is lost. This rule applies to even money bets only.

F

  • F1 [Motor Sports] Abbreviation for Formula One.
  • F&C [Motor Sports] Flagging and Communications, aka corner workers. Flaggers, communicators, safety staff at the corners of a track.
  • F-Head [Motor Sports] Side exhaust valve and overhead inlet valve.
  • F.a. [Soccer] Football Association; often used to refer to the English Football Association, who, along with FIFA and other football associations, helps maintain the rules of soccer.
  • F.I.S. [Skiing] The Fédération Internationale de Ski, (International Ski Federation) and the ruling body of international ski competition.
  • Fa [General] Football Association.
  • Faab [General] Federation of Asian Ameteur Boxing
  • Fab Four [Blackjack] A term coined by Don Schlesinger used to describe the top four surrender plays that vary from basic strategy based upon the hi-lo counting system.
  • Face [Wrestling] (noun) A wrestler who is liked by the fans. Wrestlers are generally divided into two groups, the good guys (the faces) and the bad guys (the heels). Until recently, faces were generally those wrestlers who played by the rules and more or less acted like nice guys. Today, the most popular wrestlers are often those who don’t play by the rules, don’t respect authority, and act like anything but nice guys. Also known as babyface, good guy, or fan favourite.
  • Face Angle [Golf] The position of the club face relative to the intended line of ball flight. A square face angle aligns directly at the target, an open face aligns to the right, while a closed face aligns left. (Assuming right handed golfers.)
  • Face Balanced [Golf] A putter that, when balanced toward the shaft tip, will exhibit the property of the putter face being parallel to the groundline. Face balanced putters tend to be favored by players who employ a straight back-straight through putting stroke.
  • Face Card [Blackjack] The face cards are the Jacks, Queens, and Kings. They all have a value of 10. So including the face cards there are sixteen 10-value cards per deck.
  • Face Cards [Baccarat] The jack, queen, and king, which together with the 10, have a zero valuation.
  • Face Centerline [Golf] An imaginary line intersecting the center of a club face.
  • Face Down (Game) [Blackjack] Dealing Style. In face down game, player's first card is up, second card is down. There is Face up game as well. Each style has slightly different table etiquette of play.
  • Face Insert [Golf] The center portion of the face on a wooden, composite, or metal head, typically constructed from epoxy, graphite or some type of fibrous material. Effective with a 1992 USGA ruling, all types of woods, irons and putters may have face inserts.
  • Face Mask [Ice Hockey] The protective mask worn by the goalie.
  • Face Off [Water Polo] See neutral throw.
  • Face Progression [Golf] The measurement from a shaft’s centerline to the front of the club face.
  • Face Radius Gauge [Golf] Four-sided gauge used to measure the bulge and roll of a club face. Each side of the gauge has a particular radius, for example, 9”, 11”, etc. When the side of the gauge matches the radius of the face, the bulge or roll is identified.
  • Face Screw [Golf] Aluminum, brass or steel screw(s) used to help secure face inserts into wooden or graphite wood heads.
  • Face Shield [Luge] See visor.
  • Face Up (Game) [Blackjack] Dealing Style. In face up game, both cards are dealt up and cards are not touched by player - presumably to prevent cheating. Each style has slightly different table etiquette of play.
  • Face-Off [Ice Hockey] The method of starting play; the dropping of the puck by the official between the sticks of two opposing players standing one stick length apart with stick blades flat on the ice; used to begin each period or to resume play when it has stopped for other reasons.
  • Face-Off Circles and Spots [Ice Hockey] The various circular spots on the ice where an official and two players will hold a face-off to begin or to resume the action of the game; there are one blue and four red face-off circles located in the neutral zone; two red face-off circles are found at each end of the ice.
  • Faceoff [Ice Hockey] The method of starting play at the beginning of a period or of restarting after play has been stopped for any reason. Two opposing players stand a stick-length apart with their stick blades flat on the ice and a referee or linesman drops the puck between them. Other players must remain outside the faceoff circle or at least 15 feet away if the faceoff is at a spot that's not in a circle.
  • Faceoff Circle [Ice Hockey] There are five faceoff circles, each 30 feet in diameter, one at the center of the rink and two in each end of the rink.
  • Faceoff Spot [Ice Hockey] In addition to the faceoff spots located in the center of each faceoff circle, there are four faceoff spots in the neutral zone, located directly in line with the faceoff spots in the end faceoff circles and 2 feet from the blue lines.
  • Facing the Breeze [Horse Racing] See the "death".
  • Faction [Wrestling] Translates into a group of wrestlers with a group name.
  • Factory [Motor Sports] A term designating the "Big Three" auto manufacturers, General Motors, Ford and Chrysler. The "factory days" refer to periods in the 1950s and '60s when the manufactures actively and openly provided sponsorship money and technical support to some race teams.
  • Factory Defect [Poker] An irregularity in one or more cards, such as misprinted or flawed cards or other unintentional markings, which could permit observant players to identify some (or, rarely, all) of the cards from the back.
  • Factory Equipment [Motor Sports] The standard and options that make up the equipment of a used vehicle.
  • Factory Team [Motor Sports] A team owned or operated directly by an automobile manufacturer.
  • Fade [Golf] A term used to describe the slight turning of the ball from left to right (by a right-handed player) at the end of its flight. From right to left for a left-handed player.
  • Fadeaway Jumper [Basketball] Same as fallaway jumper.
  • Faded [Golf] Gradually falling back, giving up ground to other dogs.
  • Fai [Skydiving] Fegravedegraveration Aegraveronautique Internationale: The international body which administers sport aviation throughout the world.
  • Fair [Sailing] In good condition.
  • Fair Ball [Baseball] A batted ball which lands in fair territory. If a ball lands in the infield between home and first base, or between home and third base, and bounces out-of-bounds it is a foul ball. If a fly ball lands on or beyond first or third base and then rolls out-of-bounds, it is a fair ball. Foul lines and poles are in fair territory.
  • Fair Catch [Rugby] A player may make a fair catch by catching the ball cleanly from a kick by the opposing side and calling "Mark!" He must have at least one foot on the ground behind his side's 22-meter line or within the in-goal area. A free kick is usually awarded from the spot of the catch, at the referee's discretion.
  • Fair Game [Roulette] A game where neither the house nor the player has the edge. Roulette is not a Fair Game.
  • Fair Territory [Baseball] Part of the playing field within, and including the first base and third base lines, from home base to the bottom of the playing field fence and perpendicular upwards. All foul lines are in the fair territory.
  • Fairlead [Sailing] A fitting designed to control the direction of a line with minimal friction.
  • Fairway [Golf] The area of the course between the tee and the green that is well-maintained allowing a good lie for the ball
  • Fairway Wood [Golf] A wood club used to hit the ball from the fairway, rather than the driver.
  • Faith, Hope, and Charity [Bowling] Same as Christmas Tree.
  • Fake or Feint [Soccer] A move by a player meant to deceive an opposing player; used by a ball carrier to make a defender think the ball carrier is going to dribble, pass or shoot in a certain direction when he is not.
  • Fall [Wrestling] When both of the opponent's shoulders are in contact with the mat (a pin), a wrestler is awarded a fall, which wins the match in international wrestling. In college wrestling, the pin must be held for one second, in high school wrestling for two seconds.
  • Fall Guy [General] A guilty or innocent person who accepts the full blame for a crime in order to protect others.
  • Fall Line [Skiing] The fastest route down a ski slope, but not necessarily the straightest.
  • Fall Off [Sailing] Also bear away or bear off. A boat falls off the wind when it points its bow further from the eye of the wind. The opposite of heading up.
  • Fall Rate [Skydiving] The rate at which you fall, another name for terminal velocity except that it refers the rate relative to other jumpers, rather than an absolute velocity. Fall rate is adjusted by adjusting body position. Different shape and weight jumpers in exactly the same body position will fall at different rates. Fall rate must be adjusted to be the same as everyone else so that the jumper can do RW.
  • Fall-Line [Skiing] The line a snow-ball would take down a given slope -- the steepest, shortest, and fastest line down any given slope.
  • Fallaway Jumper [Basketball] A jump shot on which the player jumps somewhat backward as well as up before launching the shot, to make it more difficult to block.
  • Falling on the Puck [Ice Hockey] An infraction, incurring a minor penalty, that occurs when a player other than a goalie deliberately falls on the puck, gathers the puck under his body while lying on the ice, or closes his hand on the puck.
  • False [Fencing] An action that is intended to fail, but draw a predicted reaction from the opponent; also, the back edge of a sabre blade.
  • False Cut [Poker] A cheating maneuver in which the deck appears to be cut, but the stacked portion remains unchanged at the top.
  • False Double Foul [Basketball] A situation in which opposing players foul one another in succession, not simultaneously, with the second foul occurring before the ball has been put back into play after the first foul. Each foul carries a separate penalty. Compare double foul; false multiple foul; multiple foul.
  • False Favorite [Horse Racing] Horse that is a race favorite but you consider the horse does not have as much chance of winning as other runners in the race. See underlay.
  • False Grid [Motor Sports] Area where cars form up before going out for practice or races.
  • False Multiple Foul [Basketball] A situation in which a team commits two fouls in succession, with the second foul occurring before the ball has been put back into play after the first foul. Each foul carries a separate penalty. Compare double foul; false double foul; multiple foul.
  • False Openers [Poker] A hand that was opened without having opening requirements. For example, in jacks or better, the opener must have already in his hand at least a pair of jacks. Someone in next-to-last position in an unopened pot might have four cards to a straight flush and dearly like to open the pot. If he does, he is said to have false openers. Usually the opener of a pot has to show openers. If he cannot prove he had openers, the player cannot win the pot.
  • False Quarter [Horse Racing] Horizontal crack in the hoof caused by injury to the coronet.
  • False Shuffle [Blackjack] The shuffling action by a cheating dealer which preserves the original order of the cards or some pre-arranged order of cards that the dealer has set up while shuffling for a certain purpose (ie to deal himself a natural, to deal a winning hand to an accomplice etc).
  • False Start [Horse Racing] The race starter will declare a false start and order a restart if one or more of the barrier tapes fail to release in a standing start event, or if in a mobile event, a runner, through no fault of its own, has been denied a fair start.
  • Falter [Horse Racing] This is when a horse tires badly.
  • Faltered [Horse Racing] Used for a horse that was in contention early and drops back in the late stages. It is more drastic than weakened but less drastic than stopped.
  • Family Pot [Poker] A pot where all of the players at the table are participating, even after each has had an opportunity to act.
  • Fan [Poker] 1) Mix the cards; shuffle the deck. 2) Spread the cards face up on the table in an overlapping fashion. 3) Spread the cards in one's hand in such a way that just the edge of each can be seen; usually done by holding the whole deck so it ends up looking like a fan.
  • Fan Belt [Motor Sports] Transmits power from a crankshaft-driven pulley to an engine fan and other accessories.
  • Fan Fin [Motor Sports] A fin on top of the hood of an IRL car, behind the air box and just forward of the rear wing. The main purpose of the fin is not aerodynamic, but rather to have a large vertical surface to paint the car's number on, in order to make identification of the cars at speed easier.
  • Fan Mail [Baseball] At first, they began to trickle in but then there was no stopping them, as literally hundreds of e-mails, faxes and chatboard posts came flooding through the information highway in praise of the Notre Dame baseball team and the way it competed at the 2000 NCAA Starkville Regional. A large portion of the comments came from the rabid Bulldogs fans, who formally had inducted the names of Notre Dame players such as Stanley, Billmaier, Tamayo, Felker, Nussbaum, Porzel and Corbin into the storied history of Dudy-Noble Field. A common thread throughout all the e-mails originating from Mississippi was a desire for the Irish to make a return visit ... and it didn't take long to work out those logistics, as Notre Dame will open its 2001 season at Mississippi State's National Bank of Commerce Classic, on Feb. 17-18.
  • Fan Method [Skiing] A more traditional method of teaching downhill turning techniques whereby the student gradually decreases their angle of approach to the fall-line with each successive attempt to produce a single turn.
  • Fancy Face [Golf] Generic term given to antique wooden woods whose faces featured unusual designs, usually constructed from different materials (dowels, pins, etc.)
  • Fandori [Martial Arts] Free sparring using throws and takedowns.
  • Faq [Blackjack] The acromym for Frequently Asked Questions, and their answers.
  • Far Post [Soccer] The goalpost furthest from the ball.
  • Far Turn [Greyhound Racing] The third turn of the racetrack.
  • Fari Gatka [Martial Arts] An Indian form of fencing centered around shields (fari) and swords (gatka). The gatka is a three foot, leather-covered stick. The fari, nine inches in diameter, is also leather bound. To score points the stick must simply touch the vital points designated on the opponent's body.
  • Farm [Poker] All one's chips; usually preceded by bet the. When a player goes all in, someone may say, "He's betting the ranch." Also, the ranch.
  • Farm Club/Team [Baseball] A minor-league team subsidized by or linked to a parent club in the major leagues.
  • Farrier [Horse Racing] Horseshoer, blacksmith. Also called a "plater."
  • Fast [Poker] To play a hand aggressively, betting and raising as much as possible. Example: "When you flop a set but there's a flush draw possible, you have to play it fast."
  • Fast (Track) [Horse Racing] Optimum condition for a dirt track that is dry, even, resilient and fast.
  • Fast Action [Poker] The state of a fast game.
  • Fast and Clean [Canoeing] Descriptive of an excellent whitewater run, since it covers the course quickly with a minimum of penalty points.
  • Fast Ball [Baseball] A straight pitch thrown by the pitcher as hard as possible.
  • Fast Break [Basketball] Also called the run-and-shoot or run-and-gun offense, it begins with a defensive rebound by a player who immediately sends an outlet pass toward midcourt to his waiting teammates; these teammates can sprint to their basket and quickly shoot before enough opponents catch up to stop them.
  • Fast Game [Poker] One with a lot of action, that is, with lots of betting, raising, and re-raising from most of the players.
  • Fast Pace [Poker] Fast pace describes a game with a lot of betting and raising, performed by most of the players; slow pace describes a game without much betting and raising.
  • Fast Peek [Poker] 1) A quick look at one's cards, done by an angle shooter in such a way as to elude detection (usually with the intention of then claiming to be betting blind). 2) A quick look by a thief at part of the deck.
  • Fast Player [Poker] An aggressive player, one who bets at almost every opportunity. In a no-limit game, one who bets large at almost every opportunity, often on risky propositions. One who bets and raises frequently, in an attempt to drive out timid or conservative players.
  • Fast Shuffle [Poker] An appearance of shuffling the cards by a cheat, but without actually changing their order (from a presumably set-up arrangement), by pulling one half of the pack through the other half, and then replacing the deck to its original position.
  • Fast Track [Horse Racing] Dry, hard strip on which horses run fastest; a track at which typical running times are relatively fast by comparison with most other tracks.
  • Fast-a [Baseball] Otherwise known as "Advanced A," these A-level minor leagues are the California League, Carolina League and Florida Stat League.
  • Fastback [Motor Sports] A car that has an unbroken curved line from the top of the roof to the rear bumper as opposed to a drop in the line for a near-vertical rear window. In a fastback design the rear window slope follows the unbroken roof line and is often at less than a 45 degree angle.
  • Fastening [Sailing] An item such as a nail, screw, rivet or other device used to fasten objects together.
  • Fat [Poker] 1) Winning. 2) Having money, usually as a result of having had a recent windfall, often in the form of a recent large win. Also, flush.
  • Fat Shaft [Golf] A shaft, designed by Wilson, that utilizes an oversize tip, over-hosel design in an attempt to provide head/shaft stabilization on off-center hits.
  • Fat Shot [Golf] When the club hits the ground behind the ball. This results in high or low shots with a loss of distance
  • Fathom [Sailing] A nautical measurement equaling 6 feet (182 cm). Usually used to measure depth.
  • Fathometer [Sailing] A brand name for a depth measuring device.
  • Fatten [Poker] 1) Put more chips in the pot; also sweeten. 2) Give one's chips to a particular player; usually followed by up. "I don't know why I keep giving him action; all I do is fatten him up all the time."
  • Fault [Badminton] Any violation of the playing rules. Faults include: An illegal service, e.g., one that is done underhand or that does not land in the proper service court. The shuttlecock hits the ground before it is returned. A shot lands outside the boundaries, fails to go over the net, or goes through the net. A player hits the shuttlecock before it crosses the net, or is guilty of a carry. A player strikes the shuttlecock twice, or both players on the same doubles team strike it.
  • Faults [Equestrian Sports] Penalty points added to a score. The most common penalties are: first disobedience: 3 faults second disobedience: 6 faults third disobedience: elimination obstacle knocked down: 4 faults one or both feet in the water: 4 faults fall of the horse or rider: elimination
  • Favorite [Horse Racing] The most popular horse in a race, which is quoted at the lowest odds because it is deemed to have the best chance of winning the race.
  • Favorite Bet [Keno] A bet selected by the player as being one that they would like stored for future re-use.
  • Favorite Toy [Baseball] The Favorite Toy is a method that is used to estimate a player's chance of getting to a specific goal in the following example, we'll say 3,000 hits. Four things are considered: 1) Need Hits - the number of hits needed to reach the goal. (This, of course, could also be "Need Home Runs" or "Need Doubles" - Whatever.) 2) Years Remaining. The number of years remaining to meet the goal is estimated by the formula 24- .6(age). This formula assigns a 20-year-old player 12.0 remaining seasons, a 25-year-old player 9.0 remaining seasons, a 30-year-old player 6.0 remaining seasons, a 35-year-old player 3.0 remaining seasons. Any player who is still playing regularly is assumed to have at least 1.5 seasons remaining, regardless of his age. 3) Established Hit Level. For 1996, the established hit level would be found by adding 1993 hits, two times 1994 hits, and three times 1995 hits, and dividing by six. However, a player cannot have an established performance level that is less than three-fourths of his most recent performance; that is, a player who had 200 hits in 1995 cannot have an established hit level below 150. 4) Projected Remaining Hits. This is found by multiplying the second number (ears remaining) by the third (established hit level). Once you get the projected remaining hits, the chance of getting to the goal is figured by (projected remaining hits) divided by (need hits), minus .5. By this method, if your "need hits" and your "projected remaining hits" are the same, your chance of reaching the goal is 50 percent. If your projected remaining hits are 20 percent more than your need hits, the chance of reaching the goal is 70 percent. Two special rules, and a note: 1) A player's chance of continuing to progress toward a goal cannot exceed .97 per year. (This rule prevents a player from figuring to have a 148 percent chance of reaching a goal.) 2) If a player's offensive winning percentage is below .500, his chance of continuing to progress toward the goal cannot exceed .75 per season. (That is, if a below-average hitter is two years away from reaching a goal, his chance of reaching that goal cannot be shown as better than nine-sixteenths, or three-fourths times three-fourths, regardless of his age.) 3) For 1994 and 1995, we used projected stats based on a full season of play..
  • Favourite [General] The most popular horse in a race, which is quoted at the lowest odds because it is deemed to have the best chance of winning the race.
  • Fb [Baseball] Fly Balls Hit Against the Pitcher (excludes line drives)
  • Fc [Motor Sports] Formula Club
  • Fcc Rules [Sailing] Federal Communications Commission Rules governing radio equipment and operation in the United States.
  • Fcw [Wrestling] Florida Championship Wrestling
  • Feather [Rowing] To turn the blade of an oar while rowing so that it's parallel to the surface of the water. The blade should be feathered during release to minimize air resistance.
  • Feather-Off [Croquet] A light take-off shot.
  • Featherie [Golf] An old leather ball stuffed with compressed feathers. Replaced by the gutta percha after 1848. Also spelled feathery.
  • Feathering [Sailing] A propeller that can have the pitch of its blade changed to reduce drag when not in use. Also see folding and variable pitch propellers.
  • Feathers [Archery] The flights on an arrow to aid in stability in flight.
  • Feathery [Golf] A 19th century ball constructed by filling a leather pouch with boiled feathers. Featheries were easily damaged and gave way to gutta-percha balls prior to the turn of the 20th century.
  • Feature [Motor Sports] The main event at a weekly racing session or regional (or, less commonly, a national) event. Typically, a short track running weekly racing will have several classes, and each class has a feature (possibly more than one) where most of the money and points for that class are awarded. Starting positions for the feature are often determined by running heat races.
  • Feature Race [Horse Racing] While usually found to be a Stakes event, the feature race is usually the race of the day that presents the highest quality horses of the day.
  • Feature Races [Greyhound Racing] Top races.
  • Fee [Horse Racing] 1) Amount paid to a jockey for riding in a race. 2) The cost of nominating, entering or starting a horse in a stakes race.
  • Feed [Poker] Throw money off to someone. "You've been feeding him all day. How about throwing off some chips this way?"
  • Feed the Kitty [Poker] 1) Bet or call foolishly, or knowing that one is taking the worst of it. Also, feed the kitty. 2) Call any bet.
  • Feed the Pot [Poker] Bet or call foolishly, or knowing that one is taking the worst of it. Also, feed the kitty.
  • Feeding [Ice Hockey] Passing the puck.
  • Feeler [Poker] A small bet made to see if anyone will raise or to determine who will just call.
  • Feeler Bet [Poker] A small bet made to see if anyone will raise or to determine who will just call.
  • Fees [Horse Racing] Amount paid to rider or the cost of nominating, entering or starting a horse in a stakes race.
  • Feet [Sailing] More than one foot. A foot is a unit of measurement used primarily in the United States. 1 foot equals 30.48 centimeters.
  • Feint [Fencing] An attack into one line with the intention of switching to another line before the attack is completed.
  • Felt [Poker] 1) The surface of most poker tables is made of some sort of felt, or is in any case referred to as such. 2) A player who is running out of chips rapidly can be referred to as "down to the felt."

G

  • G [Baseball] Number of Games at Position
  • G-Force [Motor Sports] The force exerted upon drivers as they go through various areas of a racetrack. High-speed corners exert more G-force on drivers than do slower corners. One "G" is equal to the force of gravity. Open-wheel drivers often endure up to five "G's."
  • G-Forces [Luge] Gravitational forces exerted on the sled and the slider by acceleration, deceleration, and changes in direction. These forces typically reach as high as 3 gs, where g represents the force of normal gravity, and can approach 5 gs on some runs.
  • G-Note [Poker] A one thousand dollar bill.
  • G.P.B.D. [Horse Racing] Group Preferential Barrier Draw: Indicates the computer shall divide the field in half and then apply N.P.D. to each half of the field.
  • G.T. [Motor Sports] Grand Touring From the Italian Gran Turismo. A car combining sedan and sports car features in which engineering is the dominant feature. Combines excellent road handling qualities with relative comfort. Made in two- and four-seaters with the rear seats always cramped.
  • G.T.I. [Bingo] An electronic dauber system used to play multiple packs at once. These usually require a rental fee and only one is allowed per player
  • G/F [Baseball] Ratio of Grounders to Fly Balls
  • Gaff [Poker] 1) A cheating device or method, such as a holdout machine or marking the cards. 2) To use such a device or method. To gaff the cards could mean to mark them by any of several means.
  • Gaff Rigged [Sailing] A type of traditional working boat using four sided gaff sails that are hoisted on gaffs.
  • Gaff Sail [Sailing] A four sided sail used instead of a triangular main sail. Used on gaff rigged boats.
  • Gaffe [Archery] See goat's foot lever.
  • Gaffed Wheel [Roulette] A wheel that has been rigged (by either player or the casino).
  • Gagaku [Martial Arts] (Japanese) Music for the court of the Emperor. Gagaku was the traditional form of dance and music which was authorized only in the court of the Emperor.
  • Gain Line [Rugby] An imaginary line across the field at the point where the ball became dead. See dead ball.
  • Gait [Greyhound Racing] Harness horses are divided into two distinct groups, pacers or trotters, depending on their gait when racing. The gait is the manner in that a horse moves its legs when running. The pacer is a horse with a lateral gait, whereas a trotter or square-gaiter has a diagonal gait.
  • Gaiwan [Martial Arts] External part of the forearm
  • Gake [Martial Arts] Hooking action used in some ankle and sacrifice throws.
  • Gakko [Martial Arts] School.
  • Gale [Sailing] A storm with a wind speed between 34 to 40 knots.
  • Gale Force Winds [Sailing] Wind speeds strong enough to qualify the storm as a gale.
  • Gallery [Poker] 1) Watchers; onlookers; spectators on the rail observing the action at a particular table or at a tournament. 2) Any hand having lots of picture cards.
  • Galley [Sailing] The kitchen area on a boat.
  • Gallop [Horse Racing] A horse's fastest gait. This term is also used to refer to a workout. In slang terms it refers to an easy race or workout, compared with one in which the horse is urged ("My horse in the second race just galloped!")
  • Gallows Frame [Sailing] A frame used to support the boom.
  • Gamble [Poker] 1) Loose play, or the desire to play other than tight. "He must have a lot of gamble in him, because he never lets any of it out." Also, bounce, jump.2) Play loosely. Note : This word has special meaning among poker players, and is different from the more generalized definition of the word as found in most dictionaries.
  • Gambler [Poker] One who takes chances in a poker game. According to Doyle Brunson, in his Super System, this term "... is often used to describe the class (that is, the quality) of a poker player. When the word is used this way it describes the highest class of player--which actually means that the player is not really a gambler at all, but a highly skilled player."
  • Gambling Stake [Roulette] Amount of money reserved for gambling. Same as Bankroll.
  • Game [Poker] 1) A specific poker game, in the sense of a table full of players (not in the sense of a variety of poker). "Good game on table three." 2) The specific form of poker being played; sometimes the size of a game. "Table 4 is a an Omaha game." "This is a 6-12 game." 3) A reference to the locale or format of a poker game, as a home game or private game.
  • Game Board [Bingo] An electronic display board, usually attached next to the "Bingo Board" that looks like a bingo card and shows what variation of bingo you are playing on that particular game on the program. For example, "Four Corners," "Chevron," "Regular," "Blackout," etc. See diagrams below for more examples of bingo patterns.
  • Game Clock [Basketball] Shows how much time remains in each of the four 12-minute quarters of an NBA game or two 20-minute halves of a college game.
  • Game Family [Bingo] The sum of all games of the same ticket type and same name.
  • Game Misconduct [Ice Hockey] A penalty on which a player is ejected for the rest of the game, assessed for a serious violation such as instigating a fight, continuing a fight after being separated by a linesman, or being the third party to join in a fight. The team doesn't have to play short-handed. Compare match penalty.
  • Game Point [Tennis] The point needed to win a game.
  • Game Room [Bingo] Some online games divide the players into game rooms.
  • Game Score [Baseball] A pitcher's Game Score is determined as follows: (1)Start with 50. (2)Add 1 point for eachout recorded by the starting pitcher. (3)Add 2 points for each inning the pitcher completes after the fourth inning. (4)Add one point for each strikeout.(5)Subtract 2 points for each hit allowed. (6)Subtract 4 points for each earned run allowed.(7)Subtract 2 points for an unearned run.(8)Subtract 1 point for a walk. If the starting pitcher scores over 50 and loses, it is a Tough Loss. If he wins with a game score under 50, it's a Cheap Win.
  • Game Starter [Poker] A card room employee who plays with House money, and does not share in any of his (her) winnings or losses. Shills are used to facilitate starting games, and keeping them going.
  • Game Theory [Poker] Betting or calling in a certain way when you don't know how an opponent plays so as to prevent the opponent from obtaining an edge by his own betting or calling. Against an opponent whose play you are familiar with, you bluff more or less often depending on what you know of his calling habits. Against one whose habits you don't know, though, you use game theory. For example, if there are five bets in the pot and you have a hand that can win only by bluffing, if you can get away with a (one-bet) bluff more than one-fifth of the time, you profit by this use of game theory.
  • Game Timekeeper [Ice Hockey] An official who is responsible for everything involved in timing the game: operating the scoreboard clock, sounding the buzzer that indicates the end of a period, and announcing, after 19 minutes have passed, that one minute remains in the period, among others tasks.
  • Game-Ending Home Runs [Baseball] Junior shortstop Alec Porzel has made a name for himself when it comes to game-ending home runs. In addition to his 10th-inning blast vs. Pittsburgh (11-8) on May 7, 2000, Porzel also beat the Panthers with a first-pitch, walkoff home run to cap the '99 Pittsburgh series (3-2, in the ninth). As a freshman, he ended the longest game in Eck Stadium history with a 15th-inning homer vs. West Virginia (5-3). Most recently, Porzel's first career grand slam broke an 7-7 tie in the eighth inning of the 15-7 BIG EAST Tournament win over Pittsburgh. HERING - Frank Hering was the first baseball coach at Notre Dame (1897-99) and the first paid football coach. More importantly, he unknowingly helped launch many a greeting card company by proposing an annual "Mother's Day" at his lodge in 1904. President Woodrow Wilson eventually made Mother's Day part of the nation's calendar, and it was adopted officially by Congress a few years later.
  • Gamed [Wrestling] Refers to a type of fed where some kind of game is used to resolve matches. In other words, a non-booked fed. Diced and simmed feds are both gamed, as are rules sets that depend on limited knowledge, or guessing games. Contrast with booked. Compare with diced or simmed.
  • Gamely [Golf] Hung on to win by a narrow margin.
  • Games (G) [Baseball] Number of games the player has played in.
  • Games Started (Gs) [Baseball] Number of games a player was in the lineup when the first pitch was thrown.
  • Gangaku [Martial Arts] Name of a karate kata
  • Ganmen [Martial Arts] A target area referred to in sport karate. It includes all of the head and face area.
  • Gap [Poker] 1) A missing card in a hand, particularly in the middle of an inside straight.2) Empty seat. When a table has one or more empty seats, the dealer or one of the seated players may try to entice a prospective participant this way: "Siddown. There's a gap in the trap for a sap."
  • Gap Insurance/Protection [Motor Sports] Stands for Guaranteed Auto Protection insurance. Extra insurance for lease customers to cover the difference in the actual value of the vehicle and whatever is owed on the lease. Important if the car is stolen or totaled early in the lease term. It also covers the difference in value between what may be paid by an insurance carrier and what is still owed to the leasing company, including future lease payments.
  • Gaper [Poker] A cheating device, a mirror or other shiny object, such as a highly-polished cigarette lighter, placed apparently innocently on the table, used to read the reflected faces of the cards while they are being dealt. Also gleamer, shiner, or reflector.
  • Gar Hole [Poker] A term that describes the situation in which chips are locked up (Pertaining to chips residing in the stack of a very tight player, and thus difficult for any other player to win). "You'll never get any of his chips; they're in a gar hole."
  • Garage [Motor Sports] Area of race track where cars are housed during an event; work area for car preparation while at a speedway.
  • Garbage [Poker] 1) The discards. "Pass the garbage; my deal next." 2) Poor hand. "Hey, dealer; can't you give me anything but garbage?"
  • Garbage Hand [Video Poker] A bad hand which will let you win nothing.
  • Garbage Hit/Strike [Bowling] Any hit that produces a strike when it shouldn't, as when it misses the pocket.
  • Garbage Pile [Poker] Discard pile in which all cards are dead.
  • Garden Gate [Bingo] 8
  • Gardena Miracle [Poker] An extremely lucky draw, usually greatly defying probability, and often in such a way as to defeat a hand that has considerably the best of it. If, in lowball, you have a pat 6-4, and I make the blind good and draw three cards and make a wheel, you will be justified in accusing me of having been blessed with a Gardena miracle. In draw poker, you can also draw three cards to two cards of the same suit and make a flush and also be considered to have made a Gardena miracle. Many players consider drawing two and making a straight flush or even a flush also to fall into the class of Gardena miracle, but that is more correctly called a cat hop. Also, freak draw. Named after the city of Gardena, in Southern California, which was once known as the poker-playing capital of America.
  • Gardena Razz [Poker] A form of lowball draw that used to be popular in Gardena, played as winner blind. This form of lowball is no longer very common, and the term razz usually refers to seven-card stud lowball
  • Gardena-Style [Poker] Pertaining to double-limit games; so called because these games originated in the Gardena area.
  • Garlands [Skiing] A combination of side-slipping and traversing, used as a practice exercise, often used by Alpine ski instructors.
  • Garrison Finish [Horse Racing] Drawing a fine finish on a winner, usually coming from off the pace, Derived from "Snapper" Garrison, old-time rider given to that practice.
  • Garryowen [Rugby] Same as up and under.
  • Gas can [Motor Sports] Large steel can used to fill the tank of NASCAR racers during a pit stop. A car usually holds two 10 gallon cans of fuel.
  • Gas Cans [Motor Sports] The fuel cans a pit crew member wields to refuel a stock car weigh about 100 pounds each when full. Typically the gas man empties two fuel cans during a pit stop.
  • Gas Catcher [Motor Sports] The person on a NASCAR pit crew that uses a small catch can to catch the overflow of gas from a rear pipe as the tank is filled on a pit stop.
  • Gas Man [Motor Sports] The person on a pit crew with the job of filling the car with fuel from either a can (NASCAR venue) or from a filler hose (IRL, CART or F1)
  • Gas Turbine [Motor Sports] An internal-combustion rotating engine with one main moving part: the rotor with pinwheel-like blades attached. Air is compressed by the first rows of blades and delivered to the combustion chambers, from which the exhaust is directed to pass the remaining blades and to generate the power. Power is extremely smooth due to the absence of explosions and reciprocating parts.
  • Gas-Charged Shocks [Motor Sports] Also called gas-filled shocks. They are shock absorbers filled with a low-pressure gas to smooth the vehicle's ride during up-and-down movement.
  • Gasket [Motor Sports] A thin material, made of paper, metal, silicone, or other synthetic materials, used as a seal between two similar machined metal surfaces such as cylinder heads and the engine block.
  • Gasoline Alley [Motor Sports] This is the garage area at Indy, where major mechanical work is done on the cars.
  • Gasser [Motor Sports] A drag racer that runs on gasoline.
  • Gastrapheten [Archery] A Roman engine based on the crossbow.
  • Gastric Ulcers [Horse Racing] Ulceration of a horse's stomach. Often causes symptoms of abdominal distress (colic) and general unthriftiness.
  • Gatame [Martial Arts] Locking or holding.
  • Gate [Horse Racing] A shortened term referring to the starting gate. It is also used to refer to the physical entrance of the track. Track management will use this term to refer to attendance for the day.
  • Gate Card [Horse Racing] A card, issued by the starter, stating that a horse is properly schooled in starting gate procedures.
  • Gate Controller [Skiing] One of several officials who ensure that racers pass the slalom gates correctly.
  • Gateway to Heaven [Bingo] 27
  • Gauge [Motor Sports] An instrument, usually mounted on the dashboard, used to monitor engine conditions such as fuel pressure, oil pressure and temperature, water pressure and temperature, and RPM (revolutions per minute).
  • Gave Up [Motor Sports] Drivers use this to describe a mechanical part that fails.
  • Gave Way [Golf] Tired and fell back rapidly.
  • Gaylord [Gymnastics] A high bar move that consists of a front giant into a one-and-one half front salto over the bar, followed by a re-grasp. Named for U. S. gymnast Mitch Gaylord, who created it.
  • Gb [Baseball] Groundballs Hit Against the Pitcher (hits, outs and errors)
  • Gbc [Blackjack] The acronym for Gambler's Book Club, a bookstore in Las Vegas.
  • Gcb [Blackjack] The acronym for Gaming Control Board, the Nevada agency that regulates the state's casinos.
  • Gcr [Motor Sports] General Competition Regulations. Midwestern Council Annual Racing Rule and Information book.
  • Gcw [Wrestling] Global Championship Wrestling
  • Gdp [Baseball] Times Grounded into Double Plays
  • Gdp Per Gdp Situation [Baseball] A GDP situation exists any time there is a man on first with less than two outs. This statistic measures how often a player grounds into a double play in that situation.
  • Gear [Horse Racing] The equipment carried by trotters and pacers. Gear can generally be split into three categories: pads on the legs to prevent self-inflicted injury; equipment to balance a horse in its stride; and equipment to correct waywardness or erratic behaviour. The equipment also helps a driver maintain control. Some horses are not as well-mannered or gaited as others and may require a lugging pole, shadow roll, headcheck, shin boots and/or knee boots.
  • Gear Box [Motor Sports] Racing term for a transmission.
  • Gear Effect [Golf] The effect, caused by face bulge, that tends to cause a ball hit toward the toe or heel side of face center to curve back to the intended target line.
  • Gear Ratio [Motor Sports] The ratio of engine RPM's to rear wheel RPM's. This determines the how fast the car will run on the race track as well as the fuel efficiency of a racecar. More speed requires more fuel.
  • Gears [Motor Sports] Wheels with meshing teeth to transmit power between rotating shafts. When the gear wheels are of different sizes, a change in speed ratio occurs. Gears are made of hard steel.
  • Gedan [Martial Arts] A term often used in karate to pinpoint an area to be attacked. Usually refers to the lower trunk area.
  • Gedan Barai [Martial Arts] Low block with the forearm
  • Gedan Uke [Martial Arts] Low block
  • Gedan Zuki [Martial Arts] Low punch/strike
  • Gekken [Martial Arts] A name often used in place of Kendo during the Meiji era (1868 - 1912), especially by the military.
  • Gel [Synchro Swimming] To hold uniform hairstyles in place and to keep their hair out of their eyes, swimmers use a specially formulated waterproof hair gel.
  • Gelding [Horse Racing] A Gelding is a male that has been castrated to correct behavior that would make them difficult to train for racing, or to encourage bodily growth.
  • Geländesprung [Skiing] A German word meaning terrain-jump, generally performed with a push off both poles.
  • Gendawa [Archery] A bow, Java.
  • General Property Taxes [Motor Sports] Any tax on real estate or personal property.
  • Generator [Motor Sports] A device that converts rotational energy to DC current. Generators were used in older cars to provide electrical energy for the vehicle.
  • Genin [Martial Arts] Ninja of the lowest rank who were often responsible for carrying out dangerous assignments.
  • Gennaker [Sailing] A large sail that is a cross between a spinnaker and a genoa. Hoisted without a pole, the tack is attached at the bottom of the headstay.
  • Genoa [Sailing] A large jib that overlaps the mast. Also known as a jenny.
  • Genseiryu [Martial Arts] A style of karate characterized by tumbling and somersaults.
  • Gentleman Jockey [Horse Racing] Amateur rider, generally in steeplechases.
  • Geographic North [Sailing] The direction toward the top point of the line about which the earth rotates (between Canada and Russia in the Arctic Ocean.) See also magnetic north.
  • Geographic Position [Sailing] The position of a boat on a chart.
  • Geometric Apex [Motor Sports] A point on the inside of the track at a point that bisects the angle of the entering straight and the exit straight. The geometric center of the turn.
  • George [Poker] Good, great. "Sit down. It's a George game." Opposite of Tom
  • Georgia Hoop. [Poker] Terrific. When someone says this, you know he's pleased about something.
  • Georgy [Poker] Good, great. "Sit down. It's a George game." Opposite of Tom
  • Geri [Martial Arts] Kick.
  • German Rig [Rowing] The arrangement of an eight so that riggers 4 and 5 are on the same side while the others alternate port and starboard.
  • Get [Horse Racing] Progeny of sire.
  • Get a Game Down [Poker] Start a game. A floor person might say, "As soon as we get one more player, we're going to get a 20-40 down."
  • Get a Hand Cracked [Poker] Have a good hand beaten, usually by an opponent going against the odds.
  • Get Ahead Right Here! [Baseball] Encouragement to pitcher from fielders.
  • Get Dirty! [Baseball] Exclamation - emphatic and hysterical instruction to slide or dive back to a base or face the humiliation of being tagged out.
  • Get Down [General] To make a bet.
  • Get Full Value [Poker] Betting, raising and re-raising in order to manipulate the size of the pot so that you will be getting maximum pot odds if you win the hand.
  • Get Hit with the Deck [Poker] Be in a situation of making every hand or having good hands in crucial pots, particularly when large pots are involved.
  • Get into [Horse Racing] The act of a rider when he takes the whip to the horse and gives him full head.
  • Get it Fixed. [Poker] "You lose." This is what an uncouth player says about another player's hand when he spreads his own better hand
  • Get on [General] Have your bet accepted
  • Get One's Feet Wet [Poker] Get into a pot, probably losing it.
  • Get Out [Poker] 1) Fold. "Two raises to me? I'll get out." 2) Get even. (Win after having been losing, particularly if the period of being behind was lengthy.) "I had to get stuck $2000 before I managed to get out."
  • Get Smooth [Poker] The point at which a rough lowball hand becomes not-so-rough. For example, in the hand 9-8-3-2-A, which is a rough 9, the hand gets smooth after the 8.
  • Get the Jump [Ice Hockey] To move fast and thereby get a good start on the opponents.
  • Get the Right Price [Poker] The pot odds are favorable enough for you to justify calling a bet or a raise with a drawing hand.
  • Get There [Poker] To make your hand.
  • Get Up and Run [Bingo] 31
  • Get Well [Poker] 1) Win a big pot that puts one even or ahead. "I flopped four sixes and beat two full houses. That pot got me well." 2) Win after having been losing, particularly if the period of being behind was lengthy.
  • Getaway Day [Horse Racing] The last day of a race meeting.
  • Getting Down [General] Making a wager.
  • Getting Over [Wrestling] A wrestler "gets over" when he receives an enthusuastic response from the fans for being either a "babyface" or a "heel".
  • Gf [Baseball] Ratio of Grounders to Flies

H

  • H [Poker] Hearts (the suit), in written text. Jh, for example, is the jack of hearts.
  • H17 [Blackjack] An abbreviation used to signify that the rules of a particular blackjack game include requiring the dealer to hit a soft seventeen.
  • H.O.E. [Poker] A game or tournament format in which three forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are limit hold 'em, Omaha/8, and seven-card stud high-low.
  • H.O.R.S.E [Poker] A game or tournament format in which five forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are limit hold 'em, Omaha/8, razz, seven-card stud (high), and seven-card stud high-low (the e standing for 8-or-better).
  • H.O.R.S.E.L [Poker] A game or tournament format in which six forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are limit hold 'em, Omaha/8, razz, seven-card stud (high), seven-card stud high-low, and lowball.
  • H.O.S.E [Poker] A game or tournament format in which four forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are limit hold 'em, Omaha/8, seven-card stud (high), and seven-card stud high-low.
  • H/9 [Baseball] Hits per Nine Innings
  • H/E [Poker] Shorthand, particularly in e-mail and Internet postings, for hold 'em.
  • Hachiji Dachi [Martial Arts] Open leg stance (feet directed at 45 degrees towards the exterior)
  • Hachimaki [Martial Arts] "Head wrapping." A light cotton towel, also known as a tengui, wrapped around the forehead to restrict perspiration from running into the eyes and face.
  • Hachiman [Martial Arts] (Japanese) Hachiman is the name of a Shintô God of War. Hachiman o Kami was specially venerated by the Samurai.
  • Hack [Curling] A metal or wooden plate from which the curler can push off to begin delivery. There are usually two hacks at each end of the rink, for right- and left-handed curlers.
  • Hack Line [Curling] A line, 1.2 meters from the backboards at each end of the rink, that marks the location of the hacks. The front of each hack is on the hack line.
  • Hacker [Golf] An unskilled golfer. Same as "duffer"
  • Hackeysack [Skydiving] Footbag - the art of kicking a racquet ball-sized leather-covered bag filled with beads in the air. A popular activity among skydivers (in my club anyway). A skillful hackeysack player can reach a very high status among skydivers at boogies.
  • Hacking [Basketball] A personal foul on which a player hits an opponent on the hand or forearm, usually while trying to knock the ball away.
  • Hadahk [Archery] Buriat for quiver.
  • Hadaka Jime [Martial Arts] A choke hold with the naked arm.
  • Hage-Ro [Archery] To nock an arrow on the bow, Japan.
  • Hail [Sailing] To attempt to contact another boat or shore, either by voice or radio.
  • Hail Mary [Football] A desperation pass usually lofted towards the end zone in the final seconds of a game, where there is a slim hope of a touchdown in the ensuing free-for-all.
  • Hairpin [Motor Sports] A slow, 180-turn which exits in the opposite direction a driver enters.
  • Hairpin Shot [Badminton] A shot made from very close to the net on which the shuttle rises just over the net and drops quickly on the other side. Often used to return a drop shot.
  • Hairpin Turn [Motor Sports] A hairpin turn is a sharp turn with a tight radius.
  • Hairy [Motor Sports] Frightening; originally short for "hair-raising."
  • Haishu [Martial Arts] Back of the hand
  • Haishu Uchi [Martial Arts] Strike with the back of the hand
  • Haishu Uke [Martial Arts] Block with the back of the hand
  • Haito [Martial Arts] Ridge hand (first knuckle of thumb and side of the hand)
  • Haito Uchi [Martial Arts] Ridge hand strike
  • Haito Uke [Martial Arts] Ridge hand block
  • Haiwan [Martial Arts] Upper part of the forearm
  • Haiwan Nagashi Uke [Martial Arts] Sweeping defense with the upper part of the forearm
  • Hajimae [Martial Arts] Begin; a command.
  • Hajime [Martial Arts] "Begin." Referee's command used to start a Japanese martial arts match.
  • Hakama [Martial Arts] "Divided skirt." The skirtlike trousers or cullotes primarily worn in kendo, aikido, iaido, and sometimes the upper ranks of judo.
  • Hakko Ryu [Martial Arts] A form of jujutsu in which atemi (striking) techniques are emphasized.
  • Halberd [Martial Arts] A shafted weapon with an axelike cutting blade, sometimes used to describe the Chinese quando.
  • Half [Horse Racing] A shortened term to refer to the half-mile position. The time "of the half" is the fractional time after one half of a mile of running.
  • Half a Bet [Poker] A bet equal to half the limit. Such a bet has significance only when a player has no more chips left than those with which to raise or call, in which case some establishments recognize it as a legitimate bet that can be reraised (on the side). For example, in some clubs, in, say, a $4-limit game, if I open the pot, and a few players call, and one player has $6 left, he can raise the pot. I can reraise, but to do so I need to put in two more full bets, that is, not a further $6, but a further $8. Some establishments do not even permit a player to call if he has less than a full bet. (He can play the hand through, but gets no action on his few remaining chips).
  • Half a Century [Bingo] 50
  • Half a Dollar [Poker] A $50 bill.
  • Half a Yard [Poker] A $50 bill.
  • Half and Half [Poker] Go half and half with a player on his buy-in to a game; usually preceded by go; sometimes followed by up. When the player quits, he splits with the person with whom he went cow. Sometimes the house goes cow with a player to enable him to get into a larger game than he could otherwise afford, generally with the no altruistic purpose of filling what would otherwise be a shaky game. At some point when the player (the house hopes) gets far enough ahead of the game, the house may split him out, that is, remove half of his chips and put him on his own. "Will you go half and half with me, so I can get into the $20 game?"
  • Half Brother [Horse Racing] Male horse out of the same dam, but by different sire than another horse.
  • Half Court [Tennis] The section of the court close to the service line.
  • Half Full Half [Freestyle Skating] A sequence of three flips with two twists, including a full twist on the second flip.
  • Half Half [Freestyle Skating] A sequence of two flips with a half-twist in each.
  • Half Half Full [Freestyle Skating] A sequence of three flips with two twists, including a full twist on the final flip.
  • Half Hitch [Sailing] A simple knot usually used with another knot or half hitch.
  • Half in [Freestyle Skating] A double or triple flip with a half-twist on the first flip.
  • Half Kill [Poker] A game in which the winner of two pots in a row (or the winner of the whole pot over a certain size in a high-low game) must kill the next pot.
  • Half Nelson [Wrestling] A hold in which the wrestler's arm is passed under the opponent's armpit and the hand is on the back of the opponent's head. See also full nelson.
  • Half Out [Freestyle Skating] A double or triple flip with a half-twist on the last flip.
  • Half Pass [Equestrian Sports] A forward and sideways movement in the which the horse must cross its legs.
  • Half Pirouette [Equestrian Sports] A rhythmic, half-circle turn with the inside hind foot as the pivot.
  • Half Plough [Skiing] When descending, allowing one ski to remain pointing in the direction of travel, whilst the other is skidded out at the tail and partly pressured to slow the skier down.
  • Half Randy Full [Freestyle Skating] A sequence of three flips with a total of five twists. See also randy.
  • Half Rudy [Freestyle Skating] Two backward flips with a half twist on the first and a one-and-one-half twist on the second. See also rudy.
  • Half Rudy Full [Freestyle Skating] A triple back flip, with a half-twist on the first, one and a half in the second, and a full twist in the third.
  • Half Shaft [Motor Sports] A rotating shaft that transmits power from the final drive unit (differential) to a power wheel. Used in independent rear suspension and front-wheel drive. Two are required; one for each side.
  • Half Shot [Golf] A shot played with a less than full swing.
  • Half Sister [Horse Racing] A female horse out of the same dam, buy by different sire than another horse.
  • Half Skating [Skiing] Also known as the track skating, or marathon skating, or Koch skating, or single-leg skating, or one-leg skating, or Finnstep, or Finnish step, or Siitonen step, this technique is generally used in tracks, with one ski pushing (skating) whilst the other gliding ski remains in the track, or sliding in the direction of travel.
  • Half Smart [Poker] Partially aware of the workings of thievery, but not among the inner circle.
  • Half Squat [Weight Lifting] A squat in which the knees are bent only slightly.
  • Half Swing [Golf] A swing on which the club is taken back only partway.
  • Half Time Bet [General] See First half wager and Second half wager.
  • Half Time Result [General] A wager that involves correctly predicting the result of a game at half time.
  • Half Twist [Freestyle Skating] A 180-degree rotation of the body around the skier's vertical axis.
  • Half-and-Half Game [Poker] A game in which two forms of poker are played, usually for half an hour each. For example, a half-stud, half-hold 'em game would alternate half hours with seven-card stud and hold 'em. Such a game is likely be played at relatively high stakes.
  • Half-and-Half Tournament [Poker] A tournament format in which two forms of poker are played, usually for half an hour each. For example, a half-stud, half-hold 'em tournament would alternate half hours with seven-card stud and hold 'em, generally with the limits increasing hourly or half-hourly
  • Half-Brother, Half-Sister [Horse Racing] Horses out of the same dam but by different sires. Horses with the same sire and different dams are not considered half-siblings in Thoroughbred racing.
  • Half-Century [Poker] A $50 bill
  • Half-Court [Table Tennis] One side of a court, 4 ˝ feet long by 2 ˝ feet wide, representing one quarter of the table, delineated by the net and the center line.
  • Half-Court Offense [Basketball] The offense run by a team after getting the ball into the frontcourt. There are many different half-court offenses, but they're all based on using player movement and ball movement designed to get an open shot.
  • Half-Court or Set Offense [Basketball] When a team takes the time to develop a play in its frontcourt, such as the give-and-go or a screening play; opposite of fast break.
  • Half-Court Press [Basketball] A press that's applied as soon as the opposing team gets the ball into the frontcourt.
  • Half-Distance Line [Water Polo] An imaginary line, marked by white buoys, that divides the field of play into two equal ends.
  • Half-in, Half-Out [Gymnastics] A double salto with a half twist on each salto.
  • Half-Jump Shot [Croquet] By hitting down on the ball, the striker drives both obstructing and strikers ball through the wicket.
  • Half-Mile Pole [Horse Racing] The pole at the infield rail exactly 4 furlongs from the finish line.
  • Half-Miler [Horse Racing] A track of that distance or a horse that prefers such a track.
  • Half-Nelson [Wrestling] Being being an opponent with one arm under his, your hand behind his neck. This is an elementary maneuver used to turn over an opponent who has been broken down for a pin.
  • Half-Pot Limit [Poker] A form of poker (particularly common in England) in which the current betting maximum is equal to half the money in the pot at the moment the bet is made. When calculating a raise, it can include the amount required to call the previous bet. For example, the pot contains $100. You bet the maximum permitted, $50. If I call, the pot contains $200. I am now permitted to raise your bet by $100. If I do, your call brings the pot to $400, and you could raise my bet by another $200, and so on.
  • Half-Rother, Half-Sister [Horse Racing] Horses out of the same dam but by different sires.
  • Half-Volley [Tennis] The racquet is lowered towards the ground and the ball played back immediately after it has bounced.
  • Halfback [Field Hockey] See midfielder.
  • Halftime [Soccer] The intermission between the 2 periods or halves of a game.
  • Halftime Line [General] A line on only the first half, or only the second half scoring of a football or basketball game.
  • Halfway Line [Rugby] The line that extends all the way across the field at its midpoint.
  • Halfway There [Bingo] 45
  • Halon [Motor Sports] Special freon fire extinguisher. Generally a 3 percent to 5 percent conentration will extinguish fire.
  • Halt [Equestrian Sports] Stop; a command.
  • Halter [Horse Racing] A headgear like a bridle, but lacking a bit, that is used on a horse when being handled around the barn or when being walked.
  • Halter (To) [Horse Racing] To claim a horse.
  • Halterman [Horse Racing] One who claims horses.
  • Halved [Golf] When a match is played without a decision. A hole is "halved" when both sides play it in the same number of strokes
  • Halves [Soccer] See Periods.
  • Halyard [Sailing] A line used to hoist a sail or spar. The tightness of the halyard can affect sail shape.
  • Hama Yumi [Archery] A bow used for driving away evil spirits, Japan.
  • Hammer [Poker] Last position to bet in a particular hand; sometimes the person to put the last bet in; usually preceded by the. "You got the hammer" probably means "I'll check to you" (implying, "Since you made a large bet before the draw you will probably make one after so I will check and let you hang yourself").
  • Hammer Down [Motor Sports] The driver has the pedal to the metal or has "dropped the hammer" full throttle.
  • Hammered [Cycling] Totally exhausted.
  • Hamus [Archery] A hook or spur projecting at right angles at the base of an arrow, Latin.
  • Han Kyu [Archery] A small bow, Japan.
  • Han Mu Kwan [Martial Arts] "Military arts school." A style of Korean karate.
  • Hanbo [Martial Arts] A three foot wooden staff.
  • Hand [Video Poker] Refers to a collection of up to five cards. The cards you are dealt at the start of a game are your original hand. If there is more than one way to play your original hand, then each different way is also called a hand. You goal is to pick the hand with the highest Average Payback.
  • Hand Ball [Soccer] A foul where a player touches the ball with his hand or arm; the opposing team is awarded a direct free kick.
  • Hand Bearing Compass [Sailing] A small portable compass.
  • Hand Check [Basketball] To use one or both hands, intermittently or continuously, on an opposing player, especially the ball handler. A personal foul.
  • Hand Crank [Motor Sports] A crank handle for manually starting internal combustion engines. Used till about 1930. Now obsolete.
  • Hand Deploy [Skydiving] To activate the parachute by manually deploying the pilote chute as opposed to pulling a ripcord.
  • Hand for Hand [Poker] The situation that arises near the end of a tournament in which, usually, two tables remain and a few players must bust out before the tables are combined for the final table, all of the players at which will finish in the money. Because some players might hope to guarantee a place in the money by playing slowly, hoping to outlast someone else who might go broke, the tournament director sometimes stipulates that whichever table finishes a hand first must wait for the other table before starting the next deal, and the tables play hand for hand.
  • Hand Lead [Sailing] A weight attached to a line used to determine depth by lowering it into the water.
  • Hand Mucker [Poker] A thief who palms cards, which he holds out for later introduction into the game. This usage comes from a pan (panguingue) dealer, who, in the course of dealing the game, constantly shuffles cards that have been played (taking these cards from the discard pile, or the muck) and reinserts cards of similar rank and suit into various separated places of the remainder of the deck.
  • Hand Pass [Ice Hockey] The act of batting, deflecting, or throwing the puck toward a teammate, resulting in stoppage of a play and a faceoff at the spot. A player is allowed to stop or bat the puck with a hand, provided it isn't deliberately directed at a teammate.
  • Hand Rail [Sailing] A hand hold. Usually along the cabin top or ladder.
  • Hand Ride [Horse Racing] The act of urging a horse toward longer, faster, more rhythmic stride by rolling hands on a horse's neck, lifting its head at beginning of stride.
  • Hand Signals [Motor Sports] Used by drivers to communicate with each other and race officials. See GCR. Also by race staff to communicate with drivers and other staff.
  • Hand-Checking [Basketball] A violation in which a defender uses his hand to impede a player's progress.
  • Hand-Off [Football] A running play where the quarterback hands the ball to a back.
  • Handful [General] The price of 5/1.
  • Handicap [Horse Racing] The position or mark from which a horse starts during a handicap race. For instance, those horses deemed less likely to win the event will start off the front, while the favoured runner may start off a handicap of 20 metres. This means the favourite will have to cover an extra 20 metres in the race.
  • Handicap Certificate [Golf] A document issued by the player's home club or golfing association that indicates his current handicap.
  • Handicap Player [Golf] A player whose average score is above par, and who therefore is given a handicap in certain kinds of competition.
  • Handicap Race [Horse Racing] One in which distance allowances are made for the purpose of equalising the horses' chance of winning.
  • Handicapper [Horse Racing] The racing secretary or other official who assigns weight, handicaps, and races; also, a person who analyzes a day's racing card and reports selections for the wagering public.
  • Handicapping [General] In the sports shown on Oddschecker, the only sport that uses handicapping is horse racing. All horses (once they’ve run often enough) are given an official rating. Ratings range from 0-140 points for flat racing and from 0-175 points for jump racing. Each point is equal to one pound weight (carrying the extra weight is the handicap). The handicap system is designed to ensure that all the participants in the race are well matched. Handicap)ratings for every horse are assessed and may be revised weekly depending on how well the horse performed given the quality of the other horses in the race.
  • Handily [Horse Racing] 1) Working in the morning with maximum effort. Compare with, 2) A horse racing well within itself, with little exertion from the jockey.
  • Handle [Luge] One of two metal grips, located on each side of the sled inside the pod. The handles are used to push the sled during the start and sometimes for steering during the run.
  • Handle Steer [Luge] To steer the sled by pushing or pulling on the handles.
  • Handles [Bobsledding] Bars at the back of a two-man sled that the brakeman pushes on to get it started on the descent.
  • Handling [Motor Sports] How the car behaves in corners, and how well it responds to changing track conditions. Changing a car's downforce, tires, front and/or rear wing settings, and suspension settings can alter handling.
  • Hands [Soccer] An illegal act that involves touching the ball with the hands or arms. Also a "hand-ball."
  • Handsomely [Sailing] To do something carefully and in the proper manner, such as when stowing a line.
  • Handspring [Gymnastics] A move in which the gymnast springs off the hands with a strong push from the shoulders.
  • Handstand [Gymnastics] A move in which the body is supported on both hands, with the arms straight and the body vertical.
  • Handy-Billy [Sailing] A movable block and tackle.
  • Hane Goshi [Martial Arts] A springing hip throw. (Mainly judo)
  • Hang [Horse Racing] This refers to a horse unable to produce the expected finishing kick and therefore unable to improve its position on the stretch.
  • Hang on [Cycling] To maintain contact with a group of riders, but just barely.
  • Hang Time [Basketball] The amount of time a player can stay in the air while attempting a shot.

I

  • I [Martial Arts] Will," "mind," or "intent.
  • I Can't Read 'er, She's in the Cedar [Craps] One or both of the dice landed in the players chip rack.
  • I Wait. [Poker] I check.
  • I-Ai [Archery] The art of drawing a long bow, Japan.
  • I-Ba [Archery] An archery range, Japan.
  • I-Beam Suspension [Motor Sports] A suspension beam under the car that supports the body in the shape of a capital I.
  • I-Head [Motor Sports] Both valves located directly over the piston. Also called valve--in-head or overhead valve engine.
  • I-Iro [Archery] To shoot with a bow, Japan.
  • I.S.I.a. [Skiing] The International Ski Instructors Association, an organisation that represents ski instructors from over 36 skiing nations.
  • I.S.P.O. [Skiing] Internationale Sportartikelmesse (International Sports Equipment show), held in Munich every year, and regarded as the world-wide trendsetter for ski equipment and clothing .
  • I/Gs [Baseball] Innings Per Games Started
  • Iaaf [General] International Ameteur Athletics Federation.
  • Iai [Martial Arts] "Swordplay." A sword exercise employing a series of thrusting and cutting techniques while drawing and returning the blade.
  • Iaido [Martial Arts] "Way of the sword." The modern art of drawing the samurai sword from its scabbard.
  • Iakf [General] International Ameteur Karate Federation
  • Ibb [Baseball] Intentional Bases on Ball
  • Ibf [General] International Boxing Federation.
  • Ibuki [Martial Arts] "Breath control." Isotonic breathing exercises based on dynamic tension principles practiced in conjunction with, and also separate to, the execution of karate techniques.
  • Icc [General] International Cricket Council.
  • Ice [Poker] A cold deck (A deck, presumably with preset hands in it (usually with several good hands, the best of which will go to the dealer or his confederate), surreptitiously substituted by a cheat for the deck he is supposed to be dealing.). So called because, after cards are dealt for awhile, they warm a bit to the touch, while a cold deck actually feels cool, or, by extension, like ice
  • Ice Time [Ice Hockey] The amount of time that the player is on the ice during a game when the clock is running.
  • Iceman [Motor Sports] Winston Cup driver Terry Labonte, said not to crack under pressure.
  • Icing [Ice Hockey] Shooting or directing the puck from behind the red line (in the NHL) or from the defensive zone (in amateur hockey) so that it crosses the opposition's goal line and is first touched by an opposing player other than the goaltender. Play resumes with a faceoff in the offending team's defensive zone. It is not icing if the puck passes through the goal crease or if the team is short-handed.
  • Icosahedral [Golf] Introduced in the early 1970’s, this is the most popular type of dimple pattern in use today. The pattern arranges the dimples into 20 triangular groups, allowing the same air pressure on all parts of the balls as it flies through the air, reducing wind resistance.
  • Icw [Sailing] Short for Intercoastal Waterway. A system of rivers and canals along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States allowing boats to travel along them without having to go offshore.
  • Icwa [Wrestling] International Championship Wrestling Alliance
  • Identifying the Ball [Golf] Each player has the responsibility to know the make and number of the ball and identically marked balls should not be used in the same group. Some players mark their balls with special marks so that the ball can be clearly identified with theirs on the course. -Top
  • Idiot End [Poker] An ignorant end (In hold 'em, the low end of a straight, or a straight that can lose to a higher straight.)
  • Idle Speed [Motor Sports] The speed of the engine at minimum throttle and the engine in neutral.
  • Ido [Martial Arts] (Japanese) Word used in Jűdô: a defense movement composed of eight techniques (taken in the Kime no Kata) which are executed continuously (at once).
  • Ids, Indoor Driver School [Motor Sports] Seminar series each spring to introduce newcomers to racing.
  • Ifab [Soccer] International Football Association Board — the organization consisting of 4 British soccer organizations and FIFA that approves all changes in the official international rules of soccer called the 17 Laws.
  • Ignition [Motor Sports] An electrical system used to ignite the air-fuel mixture in an internal combustion engine.
  • Ignorant End [Poker] In hold 'em, the low end of a straight, or a straight that can lose to a higher straight. This is a risky hand to hold or draw to, because someone can easily end up with a higher straight. If you have 5-6 in the hole, and the flop is 7-8-9, you have flopped the ignorant end of the straight, and will lose to anyone starting with 10-J or 6-10. Also called dumb end, idiot end.
  • Igurumi [Archery] The practice of shooting birds with arrows with cords attached to the arrows, Japan.
  • Ihra [Motor Sports] International Hot Rod Association, the junior sanctioning body for drag racing.
  • Iihf [General] International Ice Hockey Federation.
  • Ijf [General] International Judo Federation.
  • Ika [Archery] An Ainu quiver.
  • Ikc [Greyhound Racing] Interstate Kennel Club. Name applied to the racing season held at Wembley Park during the winter months, October through February.
  • Ikuba [Archery] A rather nebulous rule that is called irregularly. It's designed to prevent the use of the zone defense; itąs more like a 3-second violation for the defense, in which no defender can stay in the lane for more than, well, 3 seconds.
  • Illustrious 18 [Blackjack] A term coined by Don Schlesinger to describe the 18 most advantageous deviations from basic strategy, based on the Hi-Lo count. The 18 plays described equal about 80% of the gain that could be had from playing the full set of indexes in more complex strategy tables.
  • Im [Horse Racing] Abbreviation for intra-muscular; an injection given in a muscle.
  • Imca [Motor Sports] International Motor Contest Association. Probably the oldest existing sanctioning body in the world.
  • Imho [Blackjack] The acronym for In My Humble Opinion.
  • Immortal [Poker] An unbeatable hand, based on circumstances. For example, in seven-card stud, on the river (the last card, dealt face down) you have four aces, and no one shows two cards to a straight flush, so no one can have you beat. You have an immortal. Also, any perfect hand, as a royal flush in high poker, or a wheel in low poker. This term is frequently found in poker literature, particularly that of years gone by, but is not at all common in card rooms. Also called immortal hand, immortals, mortal nuts.
  • Immortal Nuts [Poker] Immortal (An unbeatable hand, based on circumstances.).
  • Immortals [Poker] Immortal (An unbeatable hand, based on circumstances.).
  • Imo [Blackjack] Same as IMHO but not humble.
  • Impact [Golf] The moment when the ball strikes the club.
  • Impact Gun [Motor Sports] The machine used to removed wheel nuts. Also an air wrench or air gun.
  • Impact Wrench [Motor Sports] A powered wrench that uses a combination of torque and a hammering action to loosen and tighten fasteners. Racers often use this term (improperly) as a synonym for air wrench.
  • Impaction [Horse Racing] A type of colic caused by a blockage of the intestines by ingested materials (constipation).
  • Impair [Roulette] French term for the Odd Bet.
  • Impeding [Water Polo] Hindering the movement of an opposing player who does not have possession of the ball.
  • Imperfect Deck [Poker] 1) Honest reader (A deck that has not been trimmed, or otherwise deliberately marked, but that, nonetheless, contains irregularities or factory defects, which permit observant players to identify some (or, rarely, all) of the cards from the back. Also called imperfect deck.). 2) A deck with too few, too many, or duplicated cards.
  • Implicit Collusion [Poker] A situation can arise in which the leader in a pot would prefer that one or more of his opponents fold because, while he has a positive expectation on his bet, he is not a favorite against the field. In implicit collusion, all opponents come to an independent agreement--that is, without consulting among each other--to all play in such a way as to minimize the chance of the player with the best hand winning the pot. For example, in a hold 'em tournament, a small stack may go all in and get called by one or more players with larger stacks. Those players collectively have a better chance of beating the all-in player than any does individually, and they may check down the hand till the end, that is, with no one making a bet that might drive anyone else out. The all-in player may have the best hand and be the favorite against any one of the others, but collectively, the remaining players have a better chance against the all-in player, and if they all understand--even though nothing is ever said to that effect--that all will check the hand down, that is implied collusion. In another example, a bluff may have a high chance of success against any one opponent, but against multiple opponents have no chance at all. In low-limit games, with their many players remaining at the end, a bluff against the field has almost no chance of succeeding. Again, this involves implied collusion among the players. They may not be aware of the situation, but it does exist. Similar situations arise in other games.
  • Implied Count [Blackjack] An educated guess used to modify play strategy as to the value of unseen cards in other players' hands based on the value of the dealer's card and cards taken or not taken by other players. For example, if the dealer has a stiff and a player hits a large card one can imply two extra low cards to modify play strategy.
  • Implied Odds [Poker] The amount of money you expect to win if you make your hand versus the amount of money it will cost you to continue playing - Pot odds that do not exist at the moment, but may be included in your calculations because of bets you expect to win if you hit your hand.
  • Impost [Horse Racing] Weight carried or assigned to a race horse.
  • Impound [Motor Sports] Area where top 3 cars in each class must report immediately upon coming off track after a race, for weighing and inspection. Also, Impound staff.
  • Improve [Poker] 1) Better a hand, particularly catch one needed card. For example, in draw poker, you call an all-in raise from another player to draw one card to two pair. The other player shows down a small straight. You show that you made a full house, with the comment, "I improved." Also, help. 2) Have a specific hand made in a stud or hold 'em-type game, and then, upon the appearance of another card, make a better hand. For example, your first five cards in seven-stud are 10s 9s 3s Js 5s , giving you a jack-high flush. Your next card is As , causing you to improve (to an ace-high flush).
  • Improvement [Poker] Betterment of a hand.
  • Ims [Motor Sports] Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the site of the Indy 500. This is now an IRL event.
  • Imsa [Motor Sports] International Motor Sports Association, founded by John Bishop in 1969. Sanctions, organizes, markets and officiates professional auto racing events. Season begins in February at Daytona International Speedway and ends in October on the streets of New Orleans.
  • In [Poker] 1) How many chips a player has bought altogether. "How much you in?" might be an attempt by another player to find out whether that large stack of chips you have is winnings or all your own money. Also, in for. 2) Taking part in a pot. "You in?" means "Are you partaking in this sporting venture?" 3) Having anted. In this context, "You in?" means "Did you ante?" (and implies that you didn't).
  • In a Row [Poker] Descriptive of or a name for a straight.
  • In Action [Poker] 1) Describing a pot in contention. 2) Describing an active hand. (A hand still in contention for a pot.)3) Having money, said of a player who has sufficient wherewithal to play the games of his choice. To say that John is in action means that he is not broke and implies that being broke is not unusual for John. 4) Playing or able to play. "He's in action" means "He's in a game." "He's not in action" means "He's not in a game," and is usually extended to mean that he is not currently playing poker because he has insufficient capita
  • In and Out [Golf] Greyhound moves from inside to outside throughout the race.
  • In Bounds [Soccer] When a ball is within the boundaries of the field, having not completely crossed a sideline or goal line.
  • In Foal [Horse Racing] A mare being pregnant.
  • In for [Poker] 1) The total action to which one player is entitled, usually when side pots are involved. "How much is he in for?" implies that one who is all in is entitled to only a certain portion of the pot. 2) All in, and thus entitled to only part of the pot. "I'm in for the antes" means I can win only the antes if I win; "I'm in for one bet" means I get an amount equal to one bet from each player if I win. 3) How much a player is in (How many chips a player has bought altogether. "How much you in for?" might be an attempt by another player to find out whether that large stack of chips you have is winnings or all your own money.).
  • In Front [Poker] Winning; sometimes followed by an amount. "You stuck?" "Nah, I'm in front." "I'm in front a dime."
  • In Hand [Horse Racing] Running under moderate control, at less than best pace.
  • In Ibuki [Martial Arts] "Passive" or "internal breathing." A soft-but-firm type of breathing that stems from deep in the abdomen. It is common to many different martial arts.
  • In Irons [Sailing] A sailboat with its bow pointed directly into the wind, preventing the sails from filling properly so that the boat can move. It can be very difficult to get a boat that is in irons back under sail. An old square rigger could take hours to get underway again.
  • In Light [Horse Racing] A term referring to a horse carrying relatively little weight.
  • In Line [Fencing] Descriptive of an extended sword arm that threatens the opponent.
  • In Play [Golf] The ball is in play as soon as the player has made a stroke in the teeing ground. It remains in play until the player has holed out, except when it goes out of bounds, is lost, is lifted, or is replaced by another ball in accordance with the rules.
  • In Quartata [Fencing] A counter-attack made with a quarter turn to the inside, concealing the front but exposing the back.
  • In Running [General] A term used to describe a race or event that is in progress.
  • In the Air [Poker] Traditionally, a poker tournament starts when the tournament director (or whoever's running things) instructs the dealers to get the cards "in the air." This just means to start dealing.
  • In the Blind [Poker] Bet or check blind (A mandatory bet made by certain player(s) usually sitting left of the Button before each new hand is dealt. Used in place of antes or in conjunction with antes.).
  • In the Bridle [Horse Racing] See on the bit.
  • In the Bushes [Poker] In the weeds. (The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds. For example, in a high draw game, you raised before the draw with three aces. Among the several callers, the first man took three cards and passed after the draw. Everyone else passed. You did not improve your hand, but three aces is worth a bet after the draw, so you bet. The three-card draw now raises. The others fold. You call. He shows his full house. He was waiting in the weeds.)
  • In the Centre [Baseball] An expression used by the offensive team to tell a base runner when the ball is in the possession of the pitcher, so the runner will not get picked off.
  • In the Chips [Poker] 1) Winning. 2) The state of having lots of money. Also termed in action. The phrase has passed into general usage
  • In the Dark [Poker] To check or bet blind, without looking at your cards.
  • In the Fence [Motor Sports] A phrase used to describe the wreck of a race car involving several cars or only one car.
  • In the Gut [Poker] Inside (Pertaining to an inside straight. To catch inside means to make an inside straight. An inside straight card is sometimes called a belly card.)
  • In the Hole [Poker] 1) Pertaining to a player's hole card or cards. In five-card stud: "He had an ace in the hole." In seven-card stud: "He ended up with three high spades in the hole." 2) Stuck, that is, losing. "How much are you in the hole?"
  • In the Leather [Golf] Descriptive of a ball that lies no farther from the hole than the length of the leather wrapping on the player's grip. In friendly competition, players often agree to concede such putts.
  • In the Middle [Poker] 1) Pertaining to a situation in which one player finds himself between two others who are raising frequently, or, in a no-limit game, heavily. He is not necessarily physically between these two; he is logically, however, as far as the betting goes. Also called whipsawed 2) Pertaining to a situation in which a player can receive his first hand, if he is too late to get the big blind, in the middle position. To do so is to take it in the middle, take the middle blind, or come in in the middle. (Some clubs do not let a new player, that is, new to the particular game, be dealt in until it is his turn to put in the blind, supposedly to prevent his getting any "free" hands.) Also, if a seated player has missed the blind in a particular round, he can receive his next hand only in the blind position. In such a case, a player must come in on the blind, come in in the middle, or, if not in the big blind position, over blind to receive a hand.
  • In the Money [Poker] Having lasted long enough in a tournament to guarantee finishing as one of the winners. Depending on the size of the tournament, this might be one of the top three, having made it to the final table, one of the final 16, perhaps even one of the final 26 (or more, in some very large or special tournaments).
  • In the Net [Ice Hockey] Said of the goalie, as in, "Dominik Hasek is in the net tonight."
  • In the Paint [Basketball] Descriptive of a location in the free throw lane, because it's painted a different color from the rest of the court.
  • In the Plank, not Worth a Wank [Craps] One or both of the die landed in the rail.
  • In the Pocket [Poker] Pertaining to the hole card or cards. (A card concealed in a player's hand or in stud and Hold'em, the face-down cards dealt to each player.)
  • In the Red [General] Known as odds being "in the red". The odds of when you will win less than double your money. E.g. for a $1 stake the dividend would be anything less than $2. Also Odds-On.
  • In the Weeds [Poker] The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds. For example, in a high draw game, you raised before the draw with three aces. Among the several callers, the first man took three cards and passed after the draw. Everyone else passed. You did not improve your hand, but three aces is worth a bet after the draw, so you bet. The three-card draw now raises. The others fold. You call. He shows his full house. He was waiting in the weeds. Also, bushes, as part of the terms in the bushes and lying in the bushes, and woods, as part of the terms in the woods and waiting in the woods.
  • In the Woods [Poker] In the Weeds. (The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds. For example, in a high draw game, you raised before the draw with three aces. Among the several callers, the first man took three cards and passed after the draw. Everyone else passed. You did not improve your hand, but three aces is worth a bet after the draw, so you bet. The three-card draw now raises. The others fold. You call. He shows his full house. He was waiting in the weeds. Also, bushes, as part of the terms in the bushes and lying in the bushes, and woods, as part of the terms in the woods and waiting in the woods.)
  • In Time [Fencing] At least one fencing time before the opposing action, especially with regards to a stop-hit.
  • In Tough [Horse Racing] A situation where a horse is entered with horses it is unlikely to beat.
  • In Turn [Poker] Playing when one is required (and allowed to), according to the rules of the game. That usually means waiting to act until the player before one has completed her action.
  • In Zone [Baseball] Balls Hit in the Player's Area
  • In-Car Camera [Motor Sports] The camera inside the cockpit of a race car that gives a driver's perspective of the race.
  • In-Goal [Rugby] The area between the try-line and the dead-ball line.
  • In-Hosel [Golf] The common shaft-to-head installation in which the shaft penetrates into the hosel. Used on woods, irons and putters.
  • In-Line Engine [Motor Sports] Cylinders are arranged side by side in a row and in a single bank. Most four-cylinder and some six-cylinder engines are in-line engines. In V-6, V-8 or V-12 engines, the cylinders are divided into two banks, each of which is angled away from the other in a 'V'.
  • In-Running [Greyhound Racing] Betting on a live event as it progresses. Prices are updated during the event.
  • Inboard [Powerboating] Descriptive of anything located entirely within the hull; often shorthand for an inboard motor or a boat powered by an inboard motor.
  • Inboard Cruiser [Sailing] A motorboat with an inboard engine.
  • Inboard Motor [Powerboating] A motor that's mounted entirely inside a boat's hull.
  • Inbound [Basketball] To pass the ball on a throw-in.
  • Inbounds [Basketball] The area within the end lines and sidelines of the court; also the act of bringing the ball into this area by means of a throw-in.
  • Inbounds Pass [Basketball] A pass used on the throw-in.
  • Incentive [Motor Sports] A cash refund or attractive lease or loan rate offered by an automotive manufacturer toward the purchase of a new vehicle.
  • Inch [Sailing] A unit of measurement used primarily in the United States equal to 2.54 centimeters.
  • Inches of Mercury [Sailing] A unit used when measuring the pressure of the atmosphere. 33.86 millibars. Inches of mercury are used because some barometers use the height of mercury in a sealed tube as a measuring device.
  • Incidental Contact [Basketball] Minor, basically inadvertent contact, that is usually ignored by officials.
  • Incomplete Pass [Football] A forward pass that touches the ground before being caught.
  • Inconvenienced [Horse Racing] The proper term for a horse which is checked.
  • Increasing Radius Turn [Motor Sports] Turn that opens up as you progress through it.
  • Indemnity [Motor Sports] A legal principle specifying that the insured not collect more than the actual cash value of a loss but be restored to approximately the same financial position that existed before the loss.
  • Independent [Motor Sports] Slang term for a driver or team owner who does not have financial backing from a major sponsor and must make do with secondhand equipment such as parts and tires. The term, like the breed, is becoming rarer every year.
  • Independent Suspension [Motor Sports] A suspension design that lets each wheel move up and down independently of the others. A vehicle can have two-wheel or four-wheel independent suspension; sportier models have four-wheel independent suspension. See also Multi-Link Suspension, Live Axle.
  • Index [Poker] 1) A number or letter (2 through 10 or J, Q, K, A) in the upper left-hand and lower right-hand corner of a card denoting the card's rank. (Some say that the suit indication--the single spade, heart, club, or diamond--beneath the number or letter is part of the index.) 2) A mark placed on the back of a card by a cheat to indicate the value of the card.
  • Index Bet [Greyhound Racing] Bet where the make up is determined by allocating points for performance in an event.
  • Index Number [Blackjack] A term often used by counters to identify the count for specific strategy deviations. For example, the proper index number for standing on a hard 16 versus a dealer's 10 is 0, using the Hi-Lo count.
  • Indian File [Horse Racing] When a field of horses race in single file, one behind the other.
  • Indicator [Fencing] One of two mathematical methods used to determine seedings after early rounds of competition. The first indicator is the ratio of victories to fights. The second indicator is the number of hits scored minus the number of hits received.
  • Indirect [Fencing] Descriptive of an offensive action initiated by disengaging and then passing the blade under or over the opponent's blade.
  • Indirect Free Kick [Soccer] A kick awarded to a player for a less-serious foul committed by the opposition; the player kicks a stationary ball without any opposing players within 10 feet of him; a goal can only be scored on this kick after the ball has touched another player.

J

  • J [Poker] Abbreviation for a jack, usually found only in written text about cards.
  • J Stroke [Canoeing] A stroke on which the paddle is turned to act as a rudder, keeping the boat on a straight course without having to shift the paddle to the other side for the next stroke.
  • J-Bird [Poker] Jack (the card).
  • J-Boy [Poker] Jack (the card).
  • Ja [Greyhound Racing] Jacksonville, Florida
  • Jab [Field Hockey] To poke continually at the ball in an attempt to make the attacking player lose possession.
  • Jack [Poker] 1) A face card, the one that ranks between the 10 and the queen. 2) To raise. "I'll jack it" means "I'll raise." "I'll jack the pot." Often part of the phrase jack it, jack up, or jack it up.
  • Jack Benny [Poker] In hold 'em, a 3 and a 9 as the down cards, from Benny's running gag about his age.
  • Jack High [Poker] 1) In high poker, a no pair hand whose highest card is a jack. "I have a jack high; can you beat that?" "Yeah, I got queen high." 2) In low poker, a hand topped by a jack.
  • Jack it [Poker] To raise.
  • Jack it Up [Poker] To raise.
  • Jack Jackson [Poker] Jack (the card).
  • Jack Line, Jack Stay [Sailing] A strong line, usually of flat webbing, or a wire stay running fore and aft along the sides of a boat to which a safety harness can be attached.
  • Jack Man [Motor Sports] The member of the pit crew who operates the jack during pit stops.
  • Jack Manders [Bowling] Same as field goal. (Jack Manders was a field goal kicker for the Chicago Bears back in the 1930s, so this term is pretty much dated.)
  • Jack Spavin [Horse Racing] See bone spavin.
  • Jack Stripper [Poker] A jack marked by shaving its long edge so that a thief can determine its rank by feel.
  • Jack Up [Poker] 1) Raise the limits. "Let's jack up this game!" means let's play for higher stakes. 2) Raise. "Let's jack up this pot!" means "I raise."
  • Jack-High [Poker] Pertaining to a straight or flush topped by a jack. "I was drawing to a jack-high flush but all I made was jack high."
  • Jackal [Poker] Jack (the card).
  • Jackpot [Poker] A progressive prize in some card rooms given to the player who gets, in lowball, a 6-4 beat, or, in high, a given hand, perhaps aces full, or four of a kind, beat. The procedure for collection of the prize fund differs in each card room. In some, part of the antes or blinds, called the jackpot drop is taken each hand and added to the jackpot fund. The procedure for awarding the jackpot also varies widely. In some clubs, the fund is for all games; in others, it is for a specific game. That is, for example, the 2-4 hold 'em may have one jackpot, while the 3-6 and 5-10 each has its own separate jackpot. The usual procedure is the holder of the beaten hand receives the largest share of the jackpot; the holder of the hand that beats the loser receives a smaller percentage; while the remainder of the players split a third portion. The division might be 50% of the jackpot to the loser, 25% to the holder of the winning hand, and 25% split to the other players at the table. Other divisions are found, also. In some large clubs, the jackpots frequently grow into the tens of thousands of dollars, leading to the interesting phenomenon of players specifically trying to get their hands beat, and often staying in for several bets on hands they might not otherwise play. The rules for collection and disbursement of jackpots changed in California in 1998, but the effect remains about the same. Also called bad beat jackpot.
  • Jackpot Drop [Poker] A Jackpot (A special bonus paid to the loser of a hand if he gets a very good hand beaten.)
  • Jackpot Poker [Poker] A form of poker in which the card room offers a jackpot for particularly bad beats. Typically you must have aces full or better.
  • Jackpots [Poker] A form of high draw poker, in which a player cannot open the pot without holding at least two jacks as openers before the draw. This is the same as jacks or better; the term jackpots is mostly used in home games.
  • Jacks Back [Poker] A form of five-card draw poker in which each player in turn looks at his cards, and opens if he has jacks or better (and if he wishes). If no player opens for high--and to do so he must have at least a pair of jacks (and he must show openers at some point)--then the hand is played for low (as described under ace-to-five), again starting with the player to the left of the dealer. At this point, the game becomes bet-or-fold
  • Jacks Full [Poker] A Full house consisting of three jacks and another pair.
  • Jacks Open / Tripps Win [Poker] Played like 5-card draw, with the following differences. Jacks or better are needed to open the betting (if no one can open, re-ante and re-deal). Then there is the standard betting round, draw and betting round. Then, if anyone has three-of-a-kind or better, he says so, and the highest hand wins. If not, then everyone who is still in gets another opportunity to draw. If a player has at least three-of-a-kind, he must say so and cannot keep drawing. This game almost always requires reshuffling and it must be decided beforehand when to reshuffle (after the last card, when there are less than 3 cards left or when the player asks for more than the number of cards left).
  • Jacks or Better [Video Poker] The original video poker game, with a Pair of Jacks as the minimum winning hand. The Full Pay version of this game pays 9 to 1 for a Full House and 6 to 1 for a Flush. It has a Maximum Average Payback of about 99.5%
  • Jacks Over [Poker] 1) Jacks up (Two pair, the higher of which are jacks.). 2) Jacks full (A Full house consisting of three jacks and another pair.).
  • Jacks to Open [Poker] Same as jacks or better (A form of draw poker in which a player needs at least a pair of Jacks to start the betting.).
  • Jacks Up [Poker] Two pair, the higher of which are jacks.
  • Jackson [Poker] Jack (the card).
  • Jacksonville [Poker] Jack (the card).
  • Jacksonville, Florida [Poker] Jack (the card).
  • Jacobs Ladder [Sailing] A rope ladder.
  • Jad [Skydiving] Jumpmaster Assisted Deployment. The jumpmaster holds the pilote chute in his hand and releases it one moment after that the student exits the plane, thereby deploying the main canopy.
  • Jail [Horse Racing] Refers to the requirement that a horse which has been claimed that next runs in a claiming race must run for a claiming price 25 percent higher for the next 30 days. Commonly used in the phrase The horse is in (out of) jail.
  • Jail Help, I'm in Jail! [Golf] Stated when you are faced with a very difficult shot.
  • Jake [Baseball] Clarence Kline needed only one name for those associated with college baseball to know the personality involved. "Jake" Kline began his playing career for Notre Dame in 1915 and earned three monograms while hitting .300 each year and captaining the 1917 squad. He still shares the team record with three home runs in a game. Kline returned as the Irish freshman baseball coach in '31, after spending time in World War I and in various baseball leagues. In '34, he became the school's 15th coach ... and the 16th would not be needed for another 42 seasons. Jake retired in '75 at the age of 81, coaching in more than 1,000 games and winning 558. He was voted into the College Baseball Hall of Fame in '68, and the former Cartier Field was renamed Jake Kline Field in '75. Kline remained in touch with Irish baseball and was active in many Notre Dame functions until his death in '89, at age 94. When the Irish baseball team moved to Eck Stadium in '94, Kline's name moved as well. The official title of the playing surface is Jake Kline Field at Frank Eck Stadium. K CREW - The Notre Dame pitching staff posted the team strikeout record every season from '97-'99: 399 in '97, 456 in '98 and 478 in '99 (before 454 in 2000). The Irish have averaged 447 Ks the past four seasons (1,787 total), with the '99 staff averaging 8.38 Ks per nine innings-best by an Irish staff since '63 (the 2000 staff then set the Notre Dame record for K-to-walk ratio, at 2.50). Top contributors to the K crew in the last four seasons have included current senior Aaron Heilman (314 Ks in 279.2 IP with a team-record 118 in both '99 and 2000), first-round draft pick Brad Lidge ('96-'98, 143 Ks in 129.2 IP, 93 in '98), '99 graduate Alex Shilliday (third in Irish history with 265 career Ks) and lefty Tim Kalita (214 Ks in 214 IP, '97-'99).
  • Jalopy [Motor Sports] (Slang) An old, dilapidated automobile.
  • Jam [Baseball] When a hitter gets a pitch near his hands, he is "jammed." Also when a pitcher gets himself in trouble, he is in a "jam."
  • Jam Cleat [Sailing] A cleat designed to hold a line in place without slipping. It consists of two narrowing jaws with teeth in which the line is placed. Also see cam cleat.
  • Jam it [Poker] To bet or raise the maximum, especially in no-limit, is to jam.
  • Jam it Up [Poker] To bet or raise the maximum, especially in no-limit, is to jam.
  • Jam Pot [Poker] A pot with lots of betting, raising, and re-raising
  • Jam the Pot [Poker] To bet or raise the maximum, especially in no-limit, is to jam.
  • Jam Up [Poker] To bet or raise the maximum, especially in no-limit, is to jam.
  • Jam-Up [Poker] 1) A way of playing: very good, or very tight. "He's playing jam-up and jelly-tight." 2) Really good, usually describing a game.
  • Jammed [Golf] Was caught in heavy traffic and held up.
  • Jammed Pot [Poker] The pot has been raised the maximum number of times, and may also be multi-way.
  • Japw [Wrestling] Jersey All Pro Wrestling
  • Jar [Archery] Lack of smooth action in the bow after release.
  • Jaws [Sailing] A fitting holding a boom or gaff to the mast.
  • Jaybird [Poker] Jack (the card).
  • Jayboy [Poker] Jack (the card).
  • Jc [Greyhound Racing] Jefferson County
  • Jcp [Wrestling] Jim Crockett Promotions
  • Jeet Kune do [Martial Arts] "Way of the intercepting fist." A collection of basic mental and physical concepts, observations of combat maneuvers, and philosophies of attitude gathered and developed by the late Bruce Lee.
  • Jeja [Martial Arts] Student.
  • Jenny [Sailing] A genoa jib. A large jib that overlaps the mast.
  • Jerico Transmission [Motor Sports] A type of manual transmission, designed so that most gear shifts can be accomplished without using the clutch (except for shifting into gear from a dead stop). It accomplishes this trick using "dog-ring" shifters and straight-cut gears that can be mated at different speeds without clashing (much).
  • Jerk [Golf] To hit the ball from a bad lie, rough or sand, with a downward cutting motion causing the clubhead to dig into the ground beneath the ball.
  • Jersey Side [Bowling] Same as Brooklyn side.
  • Jerusalem [Poker] The nuts (The best possible hand of a given class. The "nut flush" is the highest possible flush, but might still lose to, e.g., a full house. Usually used in Hold'em games.). "Get in a pot with him and he'll show you Jerusalem." More commonly called the Holy City
  • Jesse [Poker] Jesse James (A pot stealer; a bluffer.). If you raise me out of a pot, I might say, "Take it, Jesse." This implies that you have bluffed me out with your bet.
  • Jesse James [Poker] 1) A pot stealer; a bluffer. 2) In hold 'em, a 4 and a 5 as the down cards, because legend has it he was shot with a .45.
  • Jet [Motor Sports] When air is sent at a high velocity through the carburetor, jets direct the fuel into the airstream. Jets are made slightly larger to make a richer mixture or slightly smaller to make a more lean mixture, depending on track and weather conditions.
  • Jet Turning [Skiing] Parallel turning with both feet pushing out to unweight the ski tips, used most often over moguls.
  • Jetty [Sailing] A man made structure projecting from the shore. May protect a harbor entrance or aid in preventing beach erosion.
  • Jiao-Di [Martial Arts] (Chinese) The Chinese Martial Arts during the Han Dynasty. A form of wrestling. The opponents tried to run themselves trough with their horny helmets.
  • Jib [Sailing] A triangular sail attached to the headstay. A jib that extends aft of the mast is known as a genoa.
  • Jib Netting [Sailing] A rope net to catch the jib when it is lowered.
  • Jib Sheets [Sailing] A sheet (line) used to control the position of the jib. The jib has two sheets, and at any time one is the working sheet and the other is the lazy sheet.
  • Jib Stay [Sailing] The stay that the jib is hoisted on. Usually the headstay.
  • Jib Topsail [Sailing] A small jib set high on the headstay of a double headsail rig.
  • Jibe [Sailing] Also spelled gybe. To change direction when sailing in a manner such that the stern of the boat passes through the eye of the wind and the boom changes sides. Prior to jibing the boom will be very far to the side of the boat. Careful control of the boom and mainsail is required when jibing in order to prevent a violent motion of the boom when it switches sides. Jibing without controlling the boom properly is known as an accidental jibe. tacking is preferred to jibing because the boom is not subject to such violent changes. Jibing is usually needed when running with the wind and tacking is used when close hauled.
  • Jiffy Reefing [Sailing] A method of lowering the sail in sections so that it can be reefed quickly.
  • Jigger [Golf] An iron with moderate loft and a short shaft. No longer in use. Present equivalent is the 4 iron.
  • Jiin [Martial Arts] Name of a karate kata
  • Jikan [Martial Arts] "Time." A term used by the timekeepers at the beginning and end of a Japanese style match.
  • Jimmie Hick [Craps] A six.
  • Jimmy Hix [Poker] In lowball, a 6-high hand.
  • Jion [Martial Arts] Name of a karate kata
  • Jip Joong [Martial Arts] Concentration.
  • Jirugi [Martial Arts] Punch.
  • Jitney [Poker] $5 or a $5 chip. Comes from the five cents that used to be the fare on a jitney bus.
  • Jitsu [Martial Arts] Japanese word for techniques.
  • Jitte [Martial Arts] Name of a karate kata
  • Jiyu [Martial Arts] Freedom (of movement, et al).
  • Jiyu Ippon Kumite [Martial Arts] Half-free sparring
  • Jiyu Kumite [Martial Arts] Free sparring
  • Jm [Skydiving] JumpMaster - A jumper trained and certified to supervise students and/or novices during their jump.
  • Jo [Martial Arts] A fighting staff, 3 to 4 feet in length, used in several martial arts.
  • Job [Wrestling] In the broadest sense, to lose. In a narrower sense, to lose to another wrestler in order to get that wrestler or an angle over (see Over). Often used to mean losing badly, as in "The entire WCW was jobbed to Hogan."
  • Jobber [Wrestling] N. an unpushed wrestler who does jobs for pushed wrestlers. Barry Horowitz is probably the best known of these. Sometimes known as fish, redshirts PLs (professional losers,) or 'ham-and-eggers.' Steve Lombardi (Brooklyn Brawler) is also a well known jobber.
  • Jobber to the Stars [Wrestling] (noun) Similar to a jobber, except a JTTS is usually a better wrestler than an ordinary jobber and occasionally wins a match against a lesser opponent.
  • Jockey [Horse Racing] As a noun, a race rider; as a verb, to maneuver for position during a race.
  • Jockey Agent [Horse Racing] A person who helps a rider obtain mounts in return for 20% or more of the rider's earnings.
  • Jockey Club [Horse Racing] An organization that maintains the American Stud Book and approves thoroughbred names and registry. Not to be confused with the Jockey Club in England, where the Jockey Club is the governing body of British racing.
  • Jockey Fee [Horse Racing] Sum paid to rider for competing in a race.
  • Jockey's Guild [Horse Racing] This is a national association of race riders.
  • Jockey's Race [Horse Racing] A race whose outcome will hinge mostly on strategic thinking by the riders; i.e., one in which riders must pay close attention to pace to keep their horses fresh for a strong finish.
  • Jodan [Martial Arts] "Upward" or "upper level." A compound word affixed to the name of techniques in Japanese karate.
  • Jodan Age Uke [Martial Arts] Rising block
  • Jodan Uchi [Martial Arts] Attack at the upper level
  • Jodan Zuki [Martial Arts] Punch at the upper level
  • Jodo [Martial Arts] "Way of the stick." The Japanese method of stick fighting using a jo. Also known as jojutsu.
  • Joe Bernstein [Poker] In hold' em, 6-9 as one's first two cards. Named after a famous gambler and high roller of the 20s and 30s.
  • Joe Goz [Poker] The shift manager; the boss. "Who's the Joe Goz around here?"
  • Jofu Fa [Martial Arts] An ancient form of Chinese combat that emphasized close-range grappling techniques.
  • Jog [Poker] A brief (A tiny "ledge" shuffled into a deck by a cheater so that his accomplice can cut it at the prearranged location; a card offset by a barely perceptible fraction of an inch but able to be found by touch when cut. A brief can be felt but not easily seen; a good cutter can feel a 1/32-inch brief. Sometimes called jog, needle, or step.).
  • Jog Cut [Poker] A cut made to a brief by a cheater, such that a desired clump of cards ends up at a specified location of the deck, usually right at the top or at the bottom.
  • Jogai [Martial Arts] "Out of bounds." A term used by a referee to denote that either or both contestants are out of bounds.
  • John [Poker] 1) Jack (the card). 2) Easy prey for a thief; ignorant or naive player. From the slang term for a prostitute's customer.
  • John 3:16 [Football] Signs held up by fans in the stands behind the goalposts seeking divine intervention or attention for their team. The passage cited is: "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life."
  • Johnny [Poker] Jack (the card)
  • Johnny Moss [Poker] In hold ' em, A-T as one's first two cards.
  • Join Up [Croquet] To play the ball near its partner.
  • Joint [Horse Racing] 1) See musculoskeletal system. For injuries, see "Joint Injuries" subsection of "Musculoskeletel System" in veterinary supplement for a more detailed explanation. 2) See battery.
  • Joint Capsule [Horse Racing] The structure that comprises the boundary to the joint space.
  • Joint Favourites [General] When a bookmaker cannot split two teams for favouritism - for example, Arsenal and Manchester United may both be joint favourites at 6/4 to win the English Premiership.
  • Joint Tenancy [Motor Sports] Ownership that is shared by two or more persons.
  • Jojutsu [Martial Arts] See "jodo."
  • Joker [Blackjack] Some casinos, as a bonus to the players, have one or more jokers inserted into the deck, to be used by the players as any value card, as an instant 21, etc.
  • Joker Poker [Video Poker] A Video Poker Game where the Joker is a wild card.
  • Joker Poker Dictionary [Poker] Any poker game in which a joker is used. Also called poker with the joker
  • Joker Problems [Poker] Joker trouble (In lowball, drawing more than one card because one has the joker; usually used as an excuse to justify what others might otherwise criticize as a bad play. "Gimme two. I've got joker trouble).
  • Joker Trouble [Poker] In lowball, drawing more than one card because one has the joker; usually used as an excuse to justify what others might otherwise criticize as a bad play. "Gimme two. I've got joker trouble
  • Joker Wild [Poker] Any poker game in which a joker is used as a wild card. Also called poker with the joker.
  • Jokers Wild [Poker] Joker wild (Any poker game in which a joker is used as a wild card. Also called poker with the joker.)
  • Jolly [General] Betting parlance for the favourite in a race - the horse with the shortest odds
  • Jonin [Martial Arts] A ninja leader.
  • Joomuk [Martial Arts] Fist.
  • Joseki [Martial Arts] In a traditional Japanese dojo, the area where instructors often times line up and face the students at the beginning and end of each practice session.
  • Jostle [Horse Racing] To bump another horse during a race.
  • Journeyman [Horse Racing] A full-fledged professional jockey.
  • Joy Girl [Poker] Queen (the card).
  • Jp [Blackjack] 1. The acronym for John Patrick, author. 2. The acronym for Jerry Patterson, author.
  • Ju [Martial Arts] The idea of giving way and using the opponent's momentum against him, rather than opposing force to force. Literally "gentle" in Japanese and the basis of both judo and ju-jitsu.
  • Ju-Jitsu [Martial Arts] An old Japanese martial art, based primarily on the principle of ju. Literally, the "gentle art" in Japanese. Often spelled as one word.
  • Jubin Taisho [Martial Arts] Warm up exercises
  • Jucie [General] The bookmaker's commission, also known as vigorish.
  • Judge [Horse Racing] The person who decides the official placings and margins for each race or trial. They are also responsible for deciding who the placegetters are in the event of a photo finish or developed print.

K

  • K [Poker] Abbreviation for a king, usually found only in written text about cards.
  • K Point [Skiing] The distance on a ski jump equivalent to the height of the hill. A jump that reaches the k point is worth 60 points. Each meter over or under that distance decreases or increases the score by 2 points. On a normal hill, the k point is 90 meters from the takeoff; on a large hill, it's 120 meters away.
  • K-1 [Canoeing] Designation for a one-person kayak.
  • K-2 [Canoeing] Designation for a two-person kayak.
  • K-Boy [Poker] King (the card).
  • K/9 [Baseball] Strikeouts per Nine Innings
  • K/Bb [Baseball] Strikeout/Walk Ratio
  • K/Bb Ratio [Baseball] Strikeouts divided by Walks.
  • Ka Ryntich [Archery] The Khasi bow.
  • Kabura-Ya, Hiniki-Ya [Archery] A Japanese whistling arrow.
  • Kabuto [Martial Arts] The helmet worn by the Japanese samurai. It was made of iron or laquered leather, and was secured to the head by a series of silk cords.
  • Kachi [Martial Arts] Win" or "victory.
  • Kachi-Yuki [Archery] A Japanese quiver.
  • Kachi-Yumi [Archery] Shooting a bow while on foot, Japan.
  • Kachinuki Shiai [Martial Arts] A type of contest in which a contestant takes on each opponent in succession without rest between matches until he or she is defeated. Each win counts as one, and a draw counts as one-half but eliminates both contestants.
  • Kagi Yari [Martial Arts] "Key spear." A hooked spear used for parrying and hooking an opponent's weapon. Like the jutte, it was useful to the police in making arrests.
  • Kagi Zuki [Martial Arts] Hook punch
  • Kaidaliki [Archery] A type of Russian arrow.
  • Kaiken [Martial Arts] "Short knife." A six-inch knife used by women of the samurai class.
  • Kaiko [Martial Arts] (Japanese) The name of a very ancient Chinese Martial Art. This Martial Art was practised at the time of the Prince Dschingis Khan. It contains mongolian wrestling techniques.
  • Kajukenbo [Martial Arts] A hybrid method of combat founded in Hawaii in 1947 by five experts: Walter Choo, Joseph Holke, Frank Ordonez, Adriano Emperado, and Clarence Chang.
  • Kakato [Martial Arts] Heel of the foot.
  • Kakato Geri [Martial Arts] Kick with the heel
  • Kake [Martial Arts] Application of a technique.
  • Kake Dachi [Martial Arts] Squatted stance
  • Kakete [Martial Arts] Hook with the hand
  • Kakiwake Uke [Martial Arts] Double block with forearms with separation
  • Kaku Uchi [Archery] Target shooting, Japan.
  • Kakup [Martial Arts] Rank.
  • Kalari Payat [Martial Arts] An ancient form of Indian combat embracing hand-to-hand techniques and weapons such as the staff and daggers.
  • Kalchan [Archery] Russian for quiver.
  • Kama [Martial Arts] A farming sickle that farmers in Okinawa converted to a weapon to combat the oppressing Japanese military.
  • Kama Yari [Martial Arts] A spear to which a single-edged, sickle-shaped blade is attached.
  • Kamae [Martial Arts] "Attitude" or "posture." The stances; a general term found in all of the Japanese disciplines.
  • Kaman [Archery] An Indian composite bow.
  • Kamiza [Martial Arts] "Divine seat" or "upper seat." The area at the front of the dojo where the instructors and honored guests sit.
  • Kamm Back [Motor Sports] Named for the German aerodynamicist W. Kamm, who discovered that drag begins to increase after the rear of a car's cross-sectional area is reduced to 50 percent of the car's maximum cross section.
  • Kamăn-I Tahš [Archery] Persian for dart bow. See Arrow guide.
  • Kan Shu [Martial Arts] "Penetration hand." A Chinese training method in which a practitioner thrusts his or her hands into powder, then rice, sand, beans, and finally pebbles, to condition the limbs for striking.
  • Kanaley & O'connor [Baseball] The most prestigious honor awarded to a Notre Dame student-athlete is named in memory of a former Notre Dame baseball player and University trustee (see p. 109). The Byron V. Kanaley Award has been presented since 1927 to senior monogram athletes who have been most exemplary as students and leaders. The awards are named in honor of the Weedsport, N.Y., native and 1904 Notre Dame graduate who was an outfielder with the Notre Dame baseball program. Kanaley went on to a successful banking career in Chicago and served as a lay trustee of the University from 1915 until his death in 1960. Eleven Irish baseball players have received the award, including current Mid-American Conference commissioner Rick Chryst ('83) and 2000 recipient Jeff Perconte. The well-rounded quality of Notre Dame baseball's 2000 senior class was validated at the season-ending All-Sports Banquet, which pays tribute to the 26 varsity sports teams while recognizing a variety of award winners. Irish baseball players were recipients of two of the most prestigious awards in 2000, with Perconte receiving one of five Kanaley Awards presented that night while catcher Matt Nussbaum received the Francis Patrick O'Connor Award, presented annually to one male and one female student-athlete at Notre Dame who best embody such virtues as team spirit, inspiration, caring, courage, honesty and patience. The award is named after a student-athlete who died in 1973 following his freshman year at Notre Dame (Pat O'Connor was the son of William "Bucky" O'Connor who played guard in football for Notre Dame in the 1940's).
  • Kang Fa [Martial Arts] "Hard method." A ancient art of Chinese boxing that concentrated on kicking and thrusting techniques.
  • Kankakee [Poker] A poker game played only in private or home games, a form of seven-card stud with a communal card, in which the joker (completely wild) is turned face up in the center of the table, where it becomes part of every active player's hand
  • Kanku Sho [Martial Arts] Name of a karate kata
  • Kansas City [Poker] 1) Kansas City lowball, that is, Deuce-to-seven. 2) In ace-to-five lowball, the hand 7-5-4-3-2; so called, because that is the best hand in Kansas City lowball. 3) In ace-to-five lowball, when used attributively with a rank, generally means that card plus 5-4-3-2. For example, a Kansas City 8 is the hand 8-5-4-3-2.
  • Kansas City Lowball [Poker] Deuce-to-seven (In a game played for low, deuce to seven usually means that the best low hand is simply the worst poker hand. If you haven't figured it out already, that hand is 75432, with no flush. Deuce to seven lowball is also called Kansas City, or Kansas City lowball.).
  • Kansetsu Geri [Martial Arts] Joint lock kick (at the knee)
  • Kansetsu Waza [Martial Arts] Techniques of controlling the opponent's joints to throw, control, or immobilize him.
  • Kanzashi [Martial Arts] "Hairpin." An ornamental hairpin used for self-protection by the women of feudal Japan.
  • Kapo [Martial Arts] Arts of healing.
  • Karate [Martial Arts] "Empty hand" or "China hand." An unarmed method of combat in which all parts of the anatomy are used to punch, strike, kick or block.
  • Karate do [Martial Arts] « the way of the empty hand »
  • Karate Ka [Martial Arts] One who practises Karate
  • Karateka [Martial Arts] A karate practitioner.
  • Kari Ebira [Archery] A type of Japanese quiver.
  • Karimata [Archery] A forked arrow head, Japan.
  • Kart [Motor Sports] A very small, open-frame (no bodywork) single-seat car powered by a low-displacement engine similar to (but more powerful than) a lawnmower engine.
  • Kashira [Martial Arts] "Pommel cap" or "ferrule." A metal cap covering the tip of the hilt of Japanese swords, daggers and so forth.
  • Kasun [Archery] A Burmese self bow.
  • Kata [Martial Arts] A series of prearranged maneuvers practiced in many of the Oriental martial arts in order for one to become proficient in techniques.
  • Katana [Martial Arts] "Sword." A Japanese sword, with a curved, single-edged blade twenty-four to thirty-six inches long.
  • Katie [Poker] In hold 'em, K-T as one's first two cards.
  • Katsu [Martial Arts] Methods of revival and resuscitation.
  • Katy [Poker] In hold 'em, K-T as one's first two cards.
  • Kayak [Canoeing] A type of fully-decked canoe. The paddler is seated and uses a double-bladed paddle.
  • Kayfabe [Wrestling] (noun) Simply put, kayfabe is the act of acting. When a wrestler "breaks kayfabe," he is no longer playing the character that he is in the wrestling world, rather he is just acting like himself. In the old days there was an unwritten rule that, in order to prevent wrestling from being exposed as a work, wrestlers were never to break kayfabe when they were in the presence of wrestling fans. Today that rule has largely gone out the window, as wrestlers often break kayfabe when being interviewed on talk shows or on the internet. It has even got to the point where wrestlers occasionally break kayfabe on their own shows in order to appeal to the "smart" fans, something that wouldn’t even be considered as recently as five years ago.
  • Kcw [Wrestling] Kentuckiana Championship Wrestling
  • Keage [Martial Arts] Snapping
  • Kedging [Sailing] (1) To kedge off. A method of pulling a boat out of shallow water when it has run aground. A dinghy is used to set an anchor, then the boat is pulled toward the anchor. Those steps are repeated until the boat is in deep enough water to float. (2) A traditionally shaped anchor having flukes perpendicular to the stock of the anchor and connected by a shank. These are less common than modern anchors such as the plow and lightweight anchors.
  • Keel [Sailing] A flat surface built into the bottom of the boat to prevent the reduce the leeway caused by the wind pushing against the side of the boat. A keel also usually has some ballast to help keep the boat upright and prevent it from heeling too much. There are several types of keels, such as fin keels and full keels.
  • Keel Sole [Golf] The sole of a wooden or metal wood that is "V" shaped and designed to lower the club's center of gravity to assist in getting the ball airborne from a less than perfect lie.
  • Keel Stepped [Sailing] A mast that is stepped (placed) on the keel at the bottom of the boat rather than on the deck. Keel stepped masts are considered sturdier than deck stepped masts.
  • Keelson [Sailing] A beam attached to the top of the floors to add strength to the keel on a wooden boat.
  • Keen Ice [Curling] Ice on which stones will travel rapidly.
  • Keep Honest [Poker] To call an opponent on the river, even though you believe he has a better hand than you do.
  • Keep it or Shove it [Poker] A form of five-card stud, found only in home games, a high-low game in which, after each player has been dealt one down card, each player gets a choice, in order, on each succeeding card. When each player has one down card, there is a betting round. The dealer then offers a card off the deck to the first player. If the player wants that card, he keeps it. If he does not want it, he immediately gets the next card off the deck, and the first card is offered to the second player, who has the same options. He can take the card, or immediately get the next card off the deck, in which case that card is offered to the third player, and so on. This continues until everyone has one up card, at which point there is a second round of betting. Any card that goes all the way around the table without stopping at anyone, including the dealer, becomes dead. After the betting has been equalized, the operation starts all over, with a card being offered in turn to each player. After each time of each player having the same number of up cards another round of betting comes. After each player has four up cards, each player has the opportunity of replacing an up card with an up card, or the down card with another down card (the twist), followed again, of course, by another round of betting, and then a declaration, and then the determination of the two winners. This game is sometimes called take it or leave it, shove 'em along, or push. It is also sometimes called pass the trash, although that name is more often reserved for Anaconda.
  • Keep Someone Honest [Poker] Make sure someone is not bluffing, with respect to calling. "Well, I know you're not bluffing, but I've got trips, so I'll keep you honest." Related to pay off.
  • Keepaway Game [Basketball] A tactic used by the team that is leading near the end of a period to keep the ball from its opponents to prevent them from scoring while using up time off the game clock; also called freezing.
  • Kegler [Bowling] Another name for a bowler, from the German.
  • Keibo [Martial Arts] A wooden club used by the Japanese police.
  • Keiko Gi [Martial Arts] Uniform of the Budoka
  • Keikoku [Martial Arts] A serious violation that gives the opponent a waza-ari. (Judo)
  • Keirin [Cycling] A Japanese variation of the motorpace, with only one motorbike. Riders fight for position, attempting to get into the motorbike's slipstream in order to increase speed. Just before the last lap, the motorbike leaves the track and the riders sprint to the finish. In Japan, there's parimutuel betting on the keirin. Also spelled keiren.
  • Keito [Martial Arts] Base of the thumb
  • Keito Uchi [Martial Arts] Attack with the base of the thumb
  • Keito Uke [Martial Arts] Block with the base of the thumb
  • Kekomi [Martial Arts] Penetrating, smashing
  • Kelly Betting [Blackjack] Betting a proportion of your bankroll equal to advantage divided by the variance of the possible outcomes. This style of betting is intended to minimize the risk faced by a bettor and most betting schemes recommended by serious blackjack experts are a modification of this style of betting.
  • Kellys Eye [Bingo] 1
  • Kelter [Poker] In draw poker, a nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game. The hand is different in different parts of the country. One variant is any hand containing a 9, 5, and a 2, with one card between the 9 and the 5 and another between the 5 and the 2. This particular hand is also called a pelter or a skeet. Another variant is a hand with no card higher than a 9, no pair, and no four-flush or four-straight. Another is a sequence of cards, each separated by one rank, such as 2-4-6-8-10 or 5-7-9-J-K. This particular hand is also called an alternate straight, Dutch straight, or skip straight. The kilter generally ranks between three of a kind and an "ordinary" straight. Also Kilter.
  • Kem [Poker] A brand of plastic cards; usually followed by deck or cards
  • Kempo [Martial Arts] The way of the fist.
  • Kendo [Martial Arts] The Japanese art of fencing, which uses two types of wooden sword, the bokken and the shinai. The bokken is used primarily for practice, the shinai for full contact sparring.
  • Kenjutsu [Martial Arts] "Art of the sword." An aggressive method of swordsmanship practiced by the Japanese feudal warriors in which the combatants pitted naked blade against naked blade.
  • Kenkyaku [Martial Arts] "Fencer." One of many words used to describe those who lived by the sword, especially in literary usage.
  • Kennel [Greyhound Racing] A business that cares for and races greyhounds under contract with one or more race tracks.
  • Kennel Compound [Horse Racing] The area at a greyhound racetrack where the greyhounds are housed.
  • Keno [Lotto] A lotto game in which a set of numbers (typically 20) is selected from a large field of numbers (typically 80). Players select a smaller set of numbers (up to 10) and are awarded prizes based on how many of their numbers match those in the drawn set. Players have discretion over how many numbers to select, and can choose to play for a small prize with good odds (by selecting a small set of numbers such as three), a large prize with much greater odds (by selecting a large set of numbers such as 10) or combinations in between. In casinos, and with several lotteries, keno is played at frequent intervals, with drawings as close together as every five minutes.
  • Keno Balls [Keno] Similar to bingo balls or ping pong balls. Numbered 1-80.
  • Keno Blank [Keno] A piece of paper issued by the casino, containing the numbers 1 through 80, which the player marks to play keno.
  • Keno Board [Keno] The electronic signs that display the numbers drawn for a keno draw. Most are now LED, but older boards using light bulbs are still around,,,,A large electronic board that displays the winning keno numbers.
  • Keno Computer [Keno] Used by casinos to enter wages, determine winners, print keno tickets, prepare management reports, etc.
  • Keno Counter [Keno] The counter where players place their wagers and collect their winnings.
  • Keno Draw Simulator [Keno] A device used to produce a sequence of random numbers.
  • Keno Lounge [Keno] The main area within a casino where keno is played.
  • Keno Prize [Keno] Fixed amount paid for a Ticket achieving a specific outcome.
  • Keno Runner [Keno] A casino employee who shuttles your keno bet from wherever you are to the keno writer, and also delivers payment for winning tickets.
  • Keno Terminal [Keno] Device used by Operator to provide Keno Gaming.
  • Keno Writer [Keno] The casino employee who collects the bet, writes the duplicate ticket, and pays off winners at keno.
  • Kenpo [Martial Arts] "Fist method." A modern term describing one of the more innovative martial arts practiced in Hawaii and the Americas, developed by Ed Parker.
  • Keosuke [Martial Arts] Attention; a command.
  • Kept Busy [Motor Sports] A driver is distracted (or kept busy) by another driver who is relentlessly pursuing.
  • Keri [Martial Arts] Kick.
  • Keri Waza [Martial Arts] Kicking techniques
  • Ketch [Sailing] A sailboat with two masts. The shorter mizzen mast is aft of the main mast, but forward of the rudder post. A similar vessel, the yawl, has the mizzen mast aft of the rudder post.
  • Kevlar [Golf] A synthetic fiber manufactured by DuPont™ used in shaft and head production. It is known for its high energy absorbing characteristics, but is a lower modulus material and has limited compression properties.
  • Key [Basketball] The area encompassing the free throw circle and free throw lane; so name because it was shaped like a keyhole when the lane was narrower than the free throw circle.
  • Key Card [Poker] The one card that will make your hand.
  • Key Hand [Poker] In a tournament, the hand that proves to be a turning point, for better or worse.
  • Key Horse [Horse Racing] A single horse used in multiple combinations in an exotic wager. (sometimes also called 'pea horse')
  • Key of the Door [Bingo] 21
  • Key or Keyhole [Basketball] The area at each end of the court consisting of the foul circle, foul lane and free-throw line; named for the shape it had years ago.
  • Keyhole [Basketball] Original name for the key.
  • Keyless Entry [Motor Sports] A system for locking and unlocking doors of a vehicle with a central locking system without using the key. Usually, the user controls the locks by pressing a button on a remote key-fob transmitter. Some vehicles have electronic combination locks on the doors near the handle.
  • Keyzard [Poker] A card, particularly the card someone needs; comes from Sacramento card room double talk.
  • Ki [Martial Arts] "Spirit." Ideally, the mental and spiritual power summoned through concentration and breathing that can be applied to accomplish physical feats. This centralized energy, possessed by every person, can be manifested through the practice of just about any martial discipline.
  • Ki Khnam [Archery] Arrows, Khasi (Assam).
  • Ki-Hoko [Archery] A Japanese arrow with a pear-shaped wooded head.
  • Kiai [Martial Arts] "Spirit meeting." A loud shout or yell of self-assertion most common to the Japanese and Okinawan martial disciplines.
  • Kiba Dachi [Martial Arts] Rider (horseman) stance
  • Kibitz [Poker] Watch someone play, or stand and watch a game, often from the rail.
  • Kibitzer [Poker] A non-playing spectator; a railbird.
  • Kick [Poker] 1) To Raise. "I'll kick it" means "I raise." For this meaning, bump is sometimes used, but generally only in home games or by beginning poker players. 2) Hit a kicker on the draw (in draw poker). "My kicker kicked" means I drew two to a pair with a kicker and hit that kicker. If you draw to a pair of kings with an ace and make two pair, aces and kings, you kicked.
  • Kick a Leg Out of Bed [Motor Sports] An engine breaks a connecting rod which penetrates the engine block and ends a driver's day. Announcers describe this as the engine "blowing up."
  • Kick Double-Pole [Skiing] An ambiguous term used to describe stride double-pole.
  • Kick it [Poker] To raise.
  • Kick Point [Golf] The point of maximum bending of a shaft as measured by deflecting the tip end while the butt remains stationary.
  • Kick Save [Ice Hockey] A save on which the goalie uses his skate or extended leg to stop or deflect the puck.
  • Kick Serve [Tennis] A serve with heavy spin, causing it to change direction or bounce unexpectedly when it lands in the service court. Also known as a twist serve.
  • Kick Turn [Skiing] An about-face turn whilst stationary, by lifting one ski and reversing its direction, followed by the other ski.
  • Kick Wax [Skiing] See grip wax.
  • Kick-Off [Rugby] A place kick taken from the center of the field to begin a half.
  • Kickbacks [Bowling] The dividers between lanes; so called because pins often kick back off a divider to knock other pins downs.

L

  • L [Baseball] Losses Pct. = Winning Percentage
  • L-Head [Motor Sports] Both valves on one side of the cylinder.
  • L.T.W. [Horse Racing] Lifetime Wins: The number of wins at licensed Trotting Meetings that the horse has accumulated during its lifetime.
  • L.T.W.$. [Horse Racing] Lifetime Win Only $: The amount of winning prizemoney accumulated from Licensed Trotting Meetings by the horse during its lifetime.
  • L.W.$ - 2yo$ [Horse Racing] Lifetime Win Only $ - 2YO Win $: The amount of Winning prizemoney accumulated from Licensed Trotting Meetings minus Winning prizemoney accumulated from 2YO wins by the horse during its lifetime.
  • La Belle [Fencing] A sudden-death playoff to break a tie.
  • La Bouchere Betting System [Roulette] A type of Cancellation Betting System where numbers are cancelled out from a user-defined string of numbers after a win and added to the string after a loss. The string of numbers determines the next amount to bet.
  • La Grande [Baccarat] The French term for a 9 dealt as a natural.
  • La Hire [Poker] The jack of hearts. May have come from a knight of the court of King Charles VII of France.
  • La Petite [Baccarat] The French term for a 8 dealt as a natural.
  • Labor [Sailing] Heavy rolling or pitching while underway.
  • Labouchere [Blackjack] A betting progression, also known as the cancellation system. A bettor chooses a series of two or more numbers which add up to the profit he intends to make. He then bets the total of the two outside numbers in the series and cancels those numbers if he wins. He continues betting the two outside un-cancelled numbers until he has completed the series. If he loses a bet, he adds the amount of his loss to his series as a single number. He must therefore cancel out two numbers for each number added. This system is a good way to lose good money fast.
  • Labyrinth [Luge] A series of three or more curves that follow in rapid sequence, with no intervening straightaways.
  • Lace [Baccarat] To randomly place cards into a stack of cards one at a time.
  • Lacing [Sailing] A line used to attach a sail to a spar.
  • Lacquer [Motor Sports] A fast-drying pyroxylin paint often used to finish automobile bodies.
  • Lactic Acid [Horse Racing] Organic acid normally present in muscle tissue, produced by anaerobic muscle metabolism as a by-product of exercise. An increase in lactic acid causes muscle fatigue, inflammation and pain.
  • Lady [Poker] A Queen.
  • Lag [Golf] A long putt, on which the object is to get the ball near the hole so that it can be sunk with the next putt. As a verb, to hit such a putt.
  • Laid Up [Sailing] A boat in a dry dock.
  • Laird Shaft [Golf] Rare type of steel shaft seen in clubs produced circa 1900. It is a solid shaft with numerous holes drilled in it to reduce weight. Clubs with such shafts are highly prized by collectors.
  • Lakan [Martial Arts] The male black belt rank in the Filipino art of arnis.
  • Lalapalooza [Poker] Lollapalooza (A freak hand, often five specific, but random, cards, allowed to win once a night; generally the punch line in an elaborate shaggy dog poker story.).
  • Lalapalooze [Poker] Lollapalooza (A freak hand, often five specific, but random, cards, allowed to win once a night; generally the punch line in an elaborate shaggy dog poker story.)
  • Lallapalooza [Poker] Lollapalooza (A freak hand, often five specific, but random, cards, allowed to win once a night; generally the punch line in an elaborate shaggy dog poker story.)
  • Lamb [Poker] A sucker or mark; a poor player easily relieved of his money.
  • Lame [Horse Racing] The term used to describe a horse which is limping or has difficulty walking properly. Lameness is often caused by an injury or problem with one or more of a horse's feet and/or legs.
  • Lame' [Fencing] A metallic vest/jacket used to detect valid touches in foil and sabre.
  • Lamebrain Pete [Poker] A form of widow game, a variant of Cincinnati, found only in home games, in which each player is dealt five downcards, as in draw, followed by a betting round, and then five cards are turned face up one at a time, with each followed by another betting round, the difference from Cincinnati being that the lowest card in the widow and any others of the same rank are wild. Each player makes the best hand possible by using any combination from his five and the five in the middle
  • Lamebrains [Poker] Cincinnati, that is, the game described under Lamebrain Pete, but with no wild cards, and often played high-low.
  • Laminae [Horse Racing] A part of the hoof. See insensitive laminae and sensitive laminae. See "Hoof" in veterinary supplement for a more detailed explanation.
  • Laminated Windshield [Motor Sports] A windshield consisting of a thin layer of rubbery plastic sandwiched between two sheets of glass. When struck by the head in an accident, it bows out without puncturing, and the plastic holds the glass to prevent it from splintering.
  • Laminated Wood [Golf] A type of wooden wood head manufactured by gluing and compressing thin pieces of maple together and forming them into the shape of the head.
  • Laminitis [Horse Racing] An inflammation of the sensitive laminae of the foot. There are many factors involved, including changes in the blood flow through the capillaries of the foot. Many events can cause laminitis, including ingesting toxic levels of grain, eating lush grass, systemic disease problems, high temperature, toxemia, retained placenta, excessive weight-bearing as occurs when the opposite limb is injured, and the administration of some drugs. Laminitis usually manifests itself in the front feet, develops rapidly, and is life-threatening. In mild cases, however, a horse can resume a certain amount of athletic activity. Laminitis is the disease that caused the death of Secretariat. Also known as "founder."
  • Laminitis (Founder) [Horse Racing] Laminitis is an inflammation of the sensitive laminae that are found on the inside of the wall of the hoof. It usually affects both forelegs at the same time. When the condition first occurs, the circulation in the foot is impeded and the hoses is in great pain. If the circulation is not re-established in 24 hours, the sole of the foot will usually drop and the horse will become a chronic cripple.
  • Lammer [Poker] 1) A special chip given to the winner of a tournament for which the award is an entry or buy-in to a larger tournament. The chip can be used only to buy in to a tournament, but can be sold to another player for this purpose. For example, a super satellite at the World Series of Poker might award three lammers each worth $500. The winner might use those three lammers to buy in to a $1500 tournament, or collect two more and use them for a $2500 tournament. The term originally came from the chip-shaped markers used in other table games, such as craps, where they might indicate, for example, "on" or "off." The name probably came from these chips being made of laminated plastic. 2) The marker chip that a chip runner (or other floor person) leaves in the tray of a house dealer at a poker table when taking cash out of the dealer's tray, for which the runner will return with chips.
  • Lammers [Baccarat] Lammers are used to mark up commissions.
  • Lamé [Fencing] A metallic vest or jacket that detects valid touches in foil and sabre.
  • Lancelot [Poker] The jack of clubs. Comes from the famed knight of King Arthur's Round Table.
  • Lancewood [Golf] A dark wood with a tight grain used as a premium shaft material in the late 1800’s.
  • Land Breeze [Sailing] A wind moving from the land to the water due to temperature changes in the evening.
  • Landing Pad [Freestyle Skating] A flat area on the rut line, usually just before or after the hole, which is the best spot to land.
  • Landlocked [Sailing] Surrounded by land.
  • Landmark [Sailing] A distinctive reference point that can be used for navigation.
  • Lane [Basketball] The painted area between the end line and the free-throw line near each basket, outside which players line up for free throws. Also known as the key, because in the early years it was key-shaped. It was twice widened to its present rectangular shape.
  • Lane Press [Water Polo] A defense in which players are positioned in passing lanes, between the ball and the players they are guarding, rather than between the offensive players and the goal.
  • Lane Violation [Basketball] 1) Entering the free throw lane when the free throw is in the air but before it has touched the backboard, net, or rim. If committed by a player on the shooter's team, the free throw attempt is negated and the ball goes to the other team for a throw-in. If committed by a defensive player, it's ignored if the shot goes in but the shooter is allowed another free throw if the shot misses. 2) A three-second violation.
  • Langkap [Archery] A strong bow, Bali.
  • Langlauf [Skiing] A German word meaning 'long-running', used to describe ski racing.
  • Lanyard [Sailing] A line attached to a tool.
  • Lap [Motor Sports] One time around a track. Also used as a verb when a driver passes a car and is a full lap ahead of (or has lapped) that opponent. A driver "laps the field" by lapping every other car in the race.
  • Lap Car [Motor Sports] Any race car that is running one or more laps down to the leader of the race.
  • Lap Recorder [Speed Skating] The official who's responsible for keeping track of how many laps remain in a race and ringing a bell that tells the skaters the last lap has begun.
  • Lap(s) Down [Motor Sports] The number of laps a car is running behind the leader of the race. It can range from only one lap to several hundred.
  • Lap-and-Shoulder Belt [Motor Sports] A safety belt that secures the driver and/or passenger in the seat with a continuous web of material which fits across the lap and crosses the upper body. It keeps the occupant from jerking forward in the event of a crash. Also called three-way belt, three-point belt, or three-point safety harness.
  • Lapped [Motor Sports] When the race leader catches a car from behind and then passes that car. (The passed car has been lapped.)
  • Lapped Car [Motor Sports] A car which is running slow enough (or been in the pits long enough), such that the race leader has come all the way around the track and passed it, has been "lapped".
  • Lapped Traffic [Motor Sports] Cars that have completed at least one full lap less than the race leader.
  • Lapse [Motor Sports] The termination of a policy due to failure to pay the premium.
  • Large [Poker] Pertaining to $1000. "I lost six large" means "I lost $6000."
  • Large Bet [Poker] In a double-limit game, a bet at the larger bet size. For example, in 10-20, small bets are $10 and big bets are $20.
  • Large Butt Shaft [Golf] Any shaft with a butt diameter of over .620”.
  • Large Hill [Skiing] A ski jump hill 120 meters high. Compare normal hill.
  • Las Vegas [Blackjack] Small piece of Nevada desert - where gambling is legal - with mystic power to draw throngs of people and invite them into tossing coins into either holes made of metal or felt.
  • Las Vegas Riffle [Poker] An appearance of shuffling the cards by a cheat, done by partial or complete concealment of the deck, but without actually changing their order (from a presumably set-up arrangement), by pulling one half of the pack through the other half, and then replacing the deck to its original position. Ironically, a concealed shuffle is not permitted anywhere in Nevada. Also called false shuffle or fast shuffle
  • Las Vegas Shuffle [Poker] Las Vegas riffle (An appearance of shuffling the cards by a cheat, done by partial or complete concealment of the deck, but without actually changing their order (from a presumably set-up arrangement), by pulling one half of the pack through the other half, and then replacing the deck to its original position. Ironically, a concealed shuffle is not permitted anywhere in Nevada. Also called false shuffle or fast shuffle).
  • Las Vegas Strip [Blackjack] The portion of Las Vegas Boulevard which extends roughly from Sunset Road to Sahara Boulevard. It includes many of the most well known casinos in Las Vegas, such as the Mirage, Caesar's Palace, the Flamingo Hilton, New York - New York, Circus Circus and the Bellagio, to name a few.
  • Las Vegas Strip Rules [Blackjack] Rules referring to a game of Blackjack with a single deck, dealer standing on all 17's, double allowed on the two first cards dealt and no doubling after splitting permitted.
  • Lash [Sailing] To tie something with a line.
  • Lasix [Horse Racing] A drug given to horses in proper dosages, upon approval of the Stewards, to control bleeding through the nostrils of horses as a result of exertion.
  • Last Bet [Poker] 1) A betting scheme, used only in home games, in which the betting on one round begins with the player who initiated the betting on the previous round (if there was no raise), or with the player who put in the last raise that was called around. In stud games, the actual boards of the players have no relevance. If there was no betting on the previous round, then it goes back to the last bet of the round before. For example, in a stud game, after the first up card, John, under the gun, makes the forced high-card bet, showing an ace. Two players call, and Bill raises, showing a queen. One player calls behind, as do John and the other two players. On the next card, John has A-K and Bill has Q-J. Bill, having put in the last raise, bets first. All call. Bill is again first on the next round. 2) In a hand featuring bets with multiple raises, the last raise on a particular round. "The live one put in the last bet every round and caught runner-runner spades." This means that the player in question raised every round, perhaps putting in the third or fourth bet
  • Last Half [Horse Racing] The time recorded by a horse during the last half of the last mile travelled in a race. It is equal to the combined time recorded in the third and fourth sectionals or quarters.
  • Last Position [Poker] 1) Last to act in a particular round. 2) The card farthest from the door (front position) when the cards are held squeezed together. "How come the free peek is always in last position?"
  • Last Raise [Poker] 1) In a hand featuring bets with multiple raises, the last raise on a particular round. "The live one put in the last bet every round and caught runner-runner spades." This means that the player in question raised every round, perhaps putting in the third or fourth bet. 2) Put in the maximum number of raises in a round of betting; usually followed by the bet, the bets, or the betting. Make the maximum raise permitted in the current round. "I'll cap it" means that someone has put in the, say, third raise.
  • Last to Act [Poker] The player who acts last in a particular round. In a button game, this might be the dealer or, on the first round, the holder of the big blind. In a seven-card stud game, this is the player to the right of the high hand.
  • Last-Card Ouie [Poker] A player who stays in a pot in a stud or hold 'em game, usually with inferior cards, to the bitter end, hoping to win by catching the winning card on the end.
  • Latch [Archery] English name for the crossbow, 16th century.
  • Late 10 [Bowling] Said of the 10-pin when it is the last to fall on a strike, usually after a moment's hesitation.
  • Late & Close [Baseball] A Late & Close situation meets the following requirements: (1)the game is in the seventh inning or later, and (2)the batting team is either leading by one run, tied, or has the potential tying run on base, at bat, or on deck. Note: This situation is very similar to the characteristics of a Save Situation.
  • Late Apex [Motor Sports] A point on the inside of a turn after the geometric apex. See geometric apex.
  • Late Blind [Poker] In addition to "regular" blinds, some games allow a player (particularly a new one) to post a blind bet in return for the right to enter the game immediately and act last on the first betting round. The amount of the blind is determined by house rules, usually somewhere between the last blind and double the last blind.
  • Late Change [Horse Racing] This term refers to any change in a race after the official program has been printed.
  • Late Double [Horse Racing] A second daily double offered during the latter part of the program. See daily double.
  • Late Mail [General] On the day of the race meeting, tipsters declare the final selection of horses which they believe have the best chance of winning each race. This allows for things like late scratchings and driver changes - which may have an affect on a tipster's original thoughts as to the likely winner of each race - to be taken into account. These tips are known as the late mail.
  • Late Model [Motor Sports] A general name for an advanced-level Stock car class or division. These cars usually have purpose-built tube-frame chassis, fiberglass and aluminum bodies, and aluminum-block engines.
  • Late Money [Horse Racing] This term is used to define money that has been bet within five minutes to post.
  • Late Night Bingo [Bingo] "Session" of bingo that starts late at night, usually about 10:00 pm. Also Moonlight Bingo.
  • Late Position [Poker] A position on a round of betting in which you act after most of the other players have acted.
  • Late Rush [Golf] Picks up speed in the final stages.
  • Late Scratch [Horse Racing] This term refers to a horse withdrawn from a race after the official program has been printed.
  • Late Scratching [Horse Racing] A horse which is scratched from a race after acceptances have been declared. Any trainer who scratches a horse after acceptance time without an acceptable reason may be penalised by the Stewards.
  • Late Surrender [Blackjack] A blackjack rule which allows the player to forfeit half of his bet after seeing the dealer's up card, unless the dealer has a blackjack, in which case the player loses his entire bet.
  • Lateral [Football] Pass thrown to a teammate backwards from the team's line of scrimmage or parallel to it; unlike a forward pass (which can be thrown only once per play), players may lateral the ball as often as they want, similar to rugby.
  • Lateral Hazard [Golf] A hazard that runs parallel to the line of play, usually alongside the fairway.
  • Lateral Parry [Fencing] A parry made by redirecting the opponent's blade with a lateral arm movement.
  • Lateral Resistance [Sailing] The ability of a boat to keep from being moved sideways by the wind. Keels, daggerboards, centerboards, and leeboards are all used to improve a boat's lateral resistance.
  • Lateral Stepping [Skiing] Stepping one ski out sideways and parallel from the other ski -- often used when turning in slalom races.
  • Latex [Lotto] The material used for the scratch panel on a lottery scratch card.
  • Lath [Equestrian Sports] A thin white strip that marks the boundary of a water jump. It's lined with plasticine to show whether a horse's hoof touched it.
  • Lathered (Up) [Horse Racing] Sweat that foams up usually along neck and flanks, often before a race. Too much sweat is considered a bad sign before the start of a race, may indicate a nervous horse. Also see washed out.
  • Lathi [Martial Arts] "Staff." An Indian fighting art centered around a cane or bamboo staff about five feet in length.
  • Latitude [Sailing] Imaginary lines drawn around the world and used to measure distance north and south of the equator. 90° north is the North Pole and 90° south is the South Pole, and the equator is at 0°. Also see longitude.
  • Launch [Motor Sports] A car can be propelled or launched into the air (all four wheels are off the ground) by hitting a severe bump or another car.
  • Launch Angle [Golf] The angle of a ball’s flight immediately after it leaves the club face.
  • Launch Monitor [Golf] Computerized fitting unit used to determine the optimum driver loft for a given player through a series of hi tests..
  • Laws of the Game [Soccer] The 17 main rules for soccer established by FIFA.
  • Lay [Craps] A bet against a particular number by the wrong bettor, who gives the casino a 5% comission.
  • Lay (The) Odds [Craps] After a point has been established, the don't pass bettor can place an additional odds bet that will win if the original don't pass bet wins. The lay odds bet is paid at less than even money.
  • Lay a Price [General] Bet a favorite, lay the points
  • Lay Bet(s) [Craps] A bet that a 7 will be rolled before the number you are placing (4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10) comes up. The casino requires you to lay slightly more than the correct odds, giving the house an edge of 3.03% on 4/10, 2.5% on 5/9, and 1.82% on 6/8. This bet is the opposite of Buy Bets, and the 5% charge is on the amount you could win, not on the amount you bet. The 5% commission is usually taken up front, but some casinos take the commission after the bet wins.
  • Lay Down [Poker] To reveal one's hand in a showdown.
  • Lay Down your Hand [Poker] To fold.
  • Lay Full [Freestyle Skating] A double flip in the layout position with a full twist in the second flip.
  • Lay Full Full [Freestyle Skating] A triple flip in the layout position, with a full twist in each of the last two flips.
  • Lay Full Tuck [Freestyle Skating] A triple flip, the first in the layout position, the second in the layout position with a twist, the third in the tuck position.
  • Lay Lay [Freestyle Skating] See double layout.
  • Lay Lay Full [Freestyle Skating] A triple flip in the layout position, with a twist in the third flip.
  • Lay Line [Sailing] An imaginary line on which a sailboat can sail directly to its target without tacking.
  • Lay Odds [Poker] To give favorable odds to an opponent.
  • Lay Off [General] Bets made by one bookmaker with another bookmaker, in an effort to reduce his liability in respect of bets already laid by him with investors.
  • Lay Paint [Poker] To put markings on cards with paint, ink, or some other fluid.
  • Lay the Odds [Poker] To wager more money on a proposition or situation than you can win. This does not necessarily mean you have the worst of it; it just means you're putting up more than the other wagerer. For example, if the odds are 4-to-1 against a particular event, and you lay the odds of 3-to-1 against someone, you have the best of it.
  • Lay the Points [General] A wager on a favorite in a pointspread contest Lay The Price - A wager on a favorite in a moneyline contest
  • Lay the Price [General] A wager on a favorite in a moneyline contest
  • Lay Tuck [Freestyle Skating] A double flip, with the first in the layout position and the second in the tuck position.
  • Lay Tuck Full [Freestyle Skating] A triple flip, with the first in the layout position, the second in the tuck position, and the third in the layout position with a twist.
  • Lay Tuck Tuck [Freestyle Skating] A triple flip, with the first in the layout position and the last two in the tuck position.
  • Lay Up [Golf] To play a shorter shot than normally might be attempted. Would be done to achieve a good lie short of a hazard rather than trying to hit the green in one less shot.
  • Lay Wager [Craps] Betting against a point number that has been thrown by paying a 5 percent commission.
  • Lay-in [Basketball] A shot on which the shooter leaps up from near the basket and drops the ball gently in with one hand.
  • Lay-Up [Basketball] Similar to a lay-in, except that the ball is banked in off the backboard.
  • Layback [Rowing] The backward lean of an oarsman's body at the end of a stroke.
  • Layback Spin [Figure Skating] A spin on which the back is arched and the head and shoulders lie back.
  • Layer [General] Person offering odds, usually a bookmaker. One to one betting services and some smaller bookmakers will allow a punter to lay as well as place bets.
  • Laying a Break [Croquet] Positioning balls at future wickets to set up a break
  • Laying a Horse [General] When a bookmaker takes a risk and increases the odds of a particular horse to entice investors because the bookmaker truly believes that horse has no chance of winning the race.

M

  • M1 Bore [Golf] The bore type in a wood in which there is 1 ˝” from the ground line to the point at which the shaft bottoms out in the hosel. May also be called “standard bore” or “metal wood bore.”
  • M2 Bore [Golf] Type of wood bore in which the shaft bottoms out in the hosel 1” from the ground line.
  • M+S Rating [Motor Sports] A tire rating which indicates a tire designed to perform well in mud and snow.
  • Ma [Blackjack] An abbreviation for Multiple-Action blackjack. Your hand is played out once. The dealer's hand is played out multiple times, starting with the same up card each time. Standard blackjack strategy applies.
  • Ma Ai [Martial Arts] The distance between two opponents.
  • Ma-Ciquacle [Archery] Arrow polishers, Omaha.
  • Machine [Horse Racing] See battery.
  • Machine Man [Poker] A thief who uses a mechanical device for his cheating (for example, a holdout machine).
  • Macpherson Strut [Motor Sports] A combined damper(shock absorber) and spring unit. MacPherson struts are used in most front-wheel drive vehicles for compact packaging. MacPherson struts also allow relatively long springs that can increase suspension travel and increase bump absorption capability.
  • Made Hand [Poker] Complete hand.
  • Made in Heaven [Bingo] 67
  • Madison [Cycling] A track race of a specific duration in time, ranging from six hours to six days, for teams of two or three riders. The winner is the team covering the greatest distance in the specified time. Only one rider from each team is on the track at any given time. A rider goes as fast as possible for one or two laps, then leaves the track and is replaced by another member of the team. A unique feature of the Madison is that the rider who leaves the track hurls the teammate into the race by using a special handle in the rear pocket of the teammate's racing shorts. The event is named for Madison Square Garden, where six-day bicycle races originated.
  • Mae [Martial Arts] Front" or "forward.
  • Mae Ashi [Martial Arts] Front leg
  • Mae Ashi Geri [Martial Arts] Kick with the front leg
  • Mae Enpi Uchi [Martial Arts] Front elbow strike
  • Mae Fumikomi [Martial Arts] Front stamping kick
  • Mae Geri [Martial Arts] Front kick
  • Mae Geri Keage [Martial Arts] Front snap kick
  • Mae Geri Kekomi [Martial Arts] Front thrust kick
  • Mae Hiji Ate [Martial Arts] Front elbow strike
  • Mae Tobi Geri [Martial Arts] Jump front kick
  • Mae Ude Hineri Uke [Martial Arts] Inner forearm block
  • Magnaflux [Motor Sports] Short for 'magnetic particle inspection'. A procedure for checking all ferrous (steel) parts - suspension pieces, connecting rods, cylinder heads, etc. - for cracks and other defects utilizing a solution of metal particles and fluorescent dye and a black light. Surface cracks will appear as red lines.
  • Magnetic Bearing [Sailing] The bearing of an object after magnetic variation has been considered, but without compensation for magnetic deviation.
  • Magnetic Course [Sailing] The course of a vessel after magnetic variation has been considered, but without compensation for magnetic deviation.
  • Magnetic Deviation [Sailing] Compass error. The difference between the reading of a compass and the actual magnetic course or bearing due to errors in the compass reading. These errors can be caused by metals, magnetic fields and electrical fields near the compass. Prior to using a compass, magnetic deviation should be recorded for many different points on the compass as the error can be different at different points. The act of checking for magnetic deviation is called swinging.
  • Magnetic North [Sailing] The direction to which a compass points. Magnetic north differs from true north because the magnetic fields of the planet are not exactly in line with the north and south poles. Observed differences between magnetic and true north is known as magnetic variation.
  • Magnetic Therapy [Horse Racing] Physical therapy technique using magnetic fields. The low-energy electrical field created by the magnetic field causes dilation of the blood vessels (vasodilation) and tissue stimulation. Magnetic therapy may be used on soft tissue to treat such injuries as tendinitis or bony (skeletal) injuries such as bucked shins.
  • Magnetic Variation [Sailing] The difference between magnetic north and true north, measured as an angle. Magnetic variation is different in different locations, so the nearest compass rose to each location on a chart must be used.
  • Mahi-Si [Archery] An arrow head, Omaha.
  • Maiden [Greyhound Racing] A greyhound that has not won an official race. This is the lowest Grade designation. Once a greyhound wins a Maiden race, it advances to Grade D.
  • Maiden Claiming [Horse Racing] A claiming race specified for horses that have never won a race.
  • Maiden Claiming Race [Horse Racing] A horse race for non-winners who are eligible to be claimed. Maiden race: A race for race animals that have never won a race.
  • Maiden Race [Horse Racing] For horses that have never won. Once a thoroughbred wins a race, it must progress to another category.
  • Maiden Special Weight [Horse Racing] An allowance race for horses that have never won a race.
  • Mail [Poker] Divine that someone is bluffing. After being caught bluffing, someone might say, "You've been reading my mail."
  • Main [Skydiving] The main canopy used on every jump and re-packed by the parachutist. It's always on the bottom of the container.
  • Main Eventer [Wrestling] (noun) A wrestler who usually wrestles in the main event or somewhere else near the top of the card.
  • Main Game [Poker] 1) In a card room, the game with the highest stakes, or (sometimes) with the most action. Sometimes when a regular player first sits down to play, he may ask, "Is this the main game?" He means that he hopes the players are gambling or otherwise giving action. Sometimes the question is asked facetiously, when the player sits down in what is obviously a dead spread, that is, a game full of mostly house players or what seems to be a game with little action. 2) The game to which players must move from a forced-move game. 3) The more desirable of two (or more) games of the same form of poker at the same stakes.
  • Main Mast [Sailing] The tallest (or only) mast on a boat.
  • Main Parachute [Skydiving] The primary parachute. If it doesn't work you use your Reserve. This happens very rarely and there are Skydivers with thousands of jumps and no Reserve rides. The Main parachute is usually much higher performance than the Reserve.
  • Main Pot [Poker] When there is a side pot, that part of the pot all of the players have action in.
  • Main Stage Bingo [Bingo] The "main event" of a session of bingo, and the one said to draw the most customers. Players purchase a page (or book) of pre-printed bingo tickets to use as game boards.
  • Main Topsail [Sailing] A topsail on the main mast.
  • Main Track [Horse Racing] The dirt surface of a racetrack.
  • Mainsail [Sailing] The main sail that is suspended from the main mast.
  • Mainsheet [Sailing] The line used to control the mainsail.
  • Mairi [Martial Arts] Tapping with the hand to signify submission.
  • Majiha [Archery] A quiver, Omaha.
  • Major Hand [Poker] In high poker, (generally) a straight or better.
  • Major League Game [Poker] 1) A high-stakes game. 2) The largest game in a card room.
  • Major Penalty [Ice Hockey] A five-minute penalty imposed for serious infractions, such as fighting and spearing, and for lesser infractions that cause injury and/or draw blood. The penalized player must serve all five minutes in the penalty box, even if the opposing team scores.
  • Major Prize [Keno] Winnings exceeding an amount parameter and subject to abatement.
  • Major Studies [Baseball] The academic achievement of the Notre Dame baseball team is all the more noteworthy when considering the challenging majors being pursued by many of the team members, most notably: senior lefthander Mike Naumann (science pre-professional), junior DH Ken Meyer (civil engineering) and sophomore righthander Brandon Viloria (electrical engineering).
  • Majră, Mijrăt, Qasab [Archery] An arrow guide.
  • Makagoya [Archery] A hunting arrow, Japan.
  • Make [Poker] 1) Catch the specific hand one is trying to end up with; often followed by a (or the) hand. In draw poker, if you start with 5-6-7-8-K of mixed suits, you discard the king, and on the draw receive either a 4 or 9, you have made a straight. You have also made the hand or made a hand. The phrases "I made" and "Did you make?" are elliptical, that is, "I made my hand" and "Did you make the hand (or your hand)?", respectively, are understood. In lowball, to catch on the draw any card below one's top card that does not give one a pair is to make the hand. Similarly, though used less often, in a stud or hold 'em game, to turn a drawing hand into a complete hand is to make the hand. 2) Detect cheating. "Did the floor man make you?" means "Did the floor man notice that you were cheating?" 3) Shuffle the cards prior to the next deal; same as make the pack.
  • Make a Move [Poker] To try a bluff.
  • Make a Move on the Pot [Poker] Same as make a play (Bet strongly), often implying betting or raising strong when the other players seem weak, and often when the player making the move is himself none too strong. Also, move on the pot.
  • Make a Pass [Poker] Replace the cards in the same order as they were prior to the cut. This is a slSeven-of-hand maneuver by a card mechanic to negate the effect of the cut. Also called elevator the cut, jump the cut, shift the cut.
  • Make a Play [Poker] 1) Bluff. 2) Bet strongly. He made a play for the pot implies that he bet big to try to win it. Also make a move on the pot.
  • Make a Run [Horse Racing] Of a horse that turns on the speed, makes a move, makes a bid.
  • Make a Score [Poker] Win big.
  • Make Fast [Sailing] To attach a line to something so that it will not move.
  • Make Good [Poker] 1) Pay money owed to the pot, usually by matching one's lights, which are (usually only in a home game) chips removed from the pot by a player who has run out of chips but has agreed to stand good on any bets, chips equal in amount to the betting from the point at which the player ran out of chips. If the player loses the pot, he must make good on the money owed. For example, if he had gone light by $10, he must return those $10 in chips to the pot, plus another $10 in cash (or purchase more chips and add another $10 to the pot). 2) Put enough chips into the pot to call a bet or raise.
  • Make Perfect [Poker] In draw poker, to catch one or more cards that give the maximum improvement to the cards kept. This phrase is most common in lowball. For example, you draw one card to 7-5-2-A, and catch a 3, thus making the hand perfect. (This is actually grammatically incorrect; it should be make perfectly, but card players aren't big on grammar.)
  • Make the Blind Good [Poker] The situation in which a player has one of the various traveling blinds, dealer blind, middle blind, or big blind, someone has opened the pot, and the holder of the blind calls the opening bet, usually with a marginal hand, and with the intention of "protecting" his investment (operating under the fallacious theory that the chip or chips he has put into the pot prior to the deal in the form of the blind still belong to him).
  • Make the Cut [Golf] To qualify for the final rounds of a tournament by scoring well enough in the beginning rounds
  • Make the Deck [Poker] After the play of a hand, gather the cards and shuffle them for the deal of the next hand.
  • Make the Pack [Poker] After the play of a hand, gather the cards and shuffle them for the deal of the next hand.
  • Make them Wait [Bingo] 58
  • Make Up [Greyhound Racing] The final result of an event or market on which the bet is settled. The difference between this figure and the price at which you placed your bet multiplied by your stake gives your profit or loss.
  • Make Up the Blind [Poker] Take the middle blind, and post, or otherwise arrange to receive a hand after having missed the blind.
  • Make Up the Blinds [Poker] Take the middle blind, and post, or otherwise arrange to receive a hand after having missed the blind.
  • Make Up the Pack [Poker] After the play of a hand, gather the cards and shuffle them for the deal of the next hand.
  • Make Way [Sailing] Moving through the water.
  • Makeable Split [Bowling] A split that isn't terribly difficult to convert, though it may not exactly be easy.
  • Makeru [Martial Arts] To lose or be defeated.
  • Making the Pass [Poker] Replace the cards in the same order as they were prior to the cut. This is a slSeven-of-hand maneuver by a card mechanic to negate the effect of the cut. Also called elevator the cut, jump the cut, make a pass, shift the cut.
  • Making Up Time [Motor Sports] A driver is catching up to or gaining ground an opponent.
  • Makiwara [Martial Arts] A karate training post designed for toughening various striking points.
  • Maktah [Archery] An Indian self bow.
  • Mal [Skydiving] Skydiver talk for Malfunction.
  • Mal Pare [Fencing] French for insufficient parry.
  • Mal-Parry [Fencing] Also mal-pare'; a parry that fails to prevent the attack from landing.
  • Male Joint [Motor Sports] A ball inside a socket that can turn and pivot in any direction. Used to allow the suspension to travel while the driver steers the car.
  • Malfunction [Skydiving] When the Main Parachute doesn't work properly. There are different degrees of malfunctions, the bad ones of which cause you to use your Reserve.
  • Malicious Mischief [Motor Sports] The purposeful damaging of another's property.
  • Malila [Archery] The Veddah bow, Sri Lanka.
  • Malleolus [Archery] A fire arrow made of cane or reed.
  • Mallet [Golf] A type of putter head identified by its broad appearance from front to back when positioned at address. The Ram Zebra™ was one of the first popular mallet style putters.
  • Maloney [Gymnastics] A piked circle through a handstand with a flight from the low bar to a hang on the high bar. Named for U. S. gymnast Kristen Maloney, who created it.
  • Mambo Stud [Poker] A combination between stud and a widow game, in which players use three cards in their hands plus one community card, played high-low. Each player is dealt one down card and one up card, followed by a round of betting, one more up card, one more round of betting, and then a community card, with a final round of betting. Players use any combination of three of their four cards for high hand and any three for low. hand rankings differ from "ordinary poker." The highest ranking low hand, A -2 -3, is called a Low Mambo, and the highest ranking high hand, Q - K - A suited, is called a High Mambo. The remaining high hands rank this way: straight flush, three of a kind, straight, flush, one pair, highest card rank. There is a qualifier for low: to win the low half, a hand must be 6-high or better. One worse than a Low Mambo is A-2-4, and so on. If there is no low, the entire pot goes to the high hand.
  • Man Advantage [Ice Hockey] The situation in which a team has one more player on the ice than the opposition. See also power play.
  • Man Alive [Bingo] 5
  • Man in Black [Motor Sports] Not Wil Smith or Tommy Lee Jones, in NASCAR it refers to Dale Earnhardt.
  • Man in Motion [Football] A single player on the offense who is permitted to move parallel to the line of scimmage prior to the snap in an attempt to get open or confuse the defense. Only one man can be in motion at any time.
  • Man with the Axe [Poker] King of diamonds.
  • Man with the Star [Poker] Joker.
  • Man-Down [Water Polo] Descriptive of the 20-second period when the defensive team is one player short because of an exclusion foul.
  • Man-in-Motion [Football] A single player on the offense who is permitted to move prior to the snap; he may only run parallel to the line of scrimmage or away from it.
  • Man-to-Man [Soccer] A type of defense where each defender is assigned to mark a different forward from the other team; the most common type of defense for national-level teams.
  • Man-to-Man Betting [General] Gambling without either party taking a commission for the bet made.
  • Man-to-Man Defense [Basketball] The defensive style used in the NBA, where each defensive player is responsible for guarding one opponent.
  • Man-Up [Water Polo] Descriptive of the 20-second period when the offensive team has one player more than the defensive team because of an exclusion foul.
  • Manage [Poker] 1) Practice money management. 2) Run a card room. 3) Own a card room.
  • Management [Poker] 1) The owners of a card room. 2) Those running or managing a card room.
  • Manager [Boxing] The person in charge of a boxerąs business career. He arranges matches, and acts as an agent in negotiations. They are often notorious for taking advantage of young or gullible fighters.
  • Managing [Poker] Successfully applying the principles of money management.
  • Mande [Archery] A bow, Omaha.
  • Mandrel [Golf] A tapered steel rod around which composite materials are wrapped when making a shaft.
  • Mane [Horse Racing] The long hairs growing on the crest of the horse's neck.
  • Maniac [Poker] A very aggressive player who plays hands that more conservative players would probably not consider.
  • Manifest [Skydiving] 1) The list of skydivers on the jump plane. 2) The act of going to the office where this list is maintained to put yourself on a plane. 3) The location where manifesting takes place.
  • Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (Map Sensor) [Motor Sports] Detects engine load by measuring air pressure or vacuum in the intake manifold.
  • Manipulators [Fencing] The index finger and thumb of the sword hand.
  • Manque [Roulette] French term for Low Bet.
  • Manual Transmission [Motor Sports] A mechanism in the drive train with gears to vary the power and torque delivered to the driven wheels. It consists of a lever that the driver operates in conjunction with the clutch to change from one gear to another.
  • Manuballista [Archery] The Latin for crossbow. See Arbalest.
  • Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (Msrp) [Motor Sports] The suggested selling price of the vehicle. Does not include destination charges, optional equipment, or taxes.
  • Maples [Bowling] Pins, because that's the wood they used to be made from.
  • Maraging [Fencing] A special steel used for making blades; said to be stronger and break more cleanly than conventional steels.
  • Maraging Steel [Golf] An alloy or family of steels with unique properties. Typically maraging steels are harder than are non-maraging steels such as 17-4 and 15-5. Maraging steel is commonly used in club face applications, rather than in entire club heads.
  • Marathon [Horse Racing] A horse race longer than 1 and 1/4 miles; a greyhound race at 7/16 mile.
  • Marathon Course [Greyhound Racing] The longest course distance at Mile High, measuring 2,407 feet, or about 7/16ths of a mile.
  • Marathon Skating [Skiing] See half skating.
  • Marbles [Motor Sports] Small bits of rubber that have broken off tires during a race. They are usually found in corners and are more likely to gather on the outside of the racing line. If a car drives over the pieces, it tends to lose control, as if it were on a bunch of marbles.
  • March Madness [Basketball] See NCAA Tournament.
  • Mare [Horse Racing] Female horse 5 years old or older. Also, female of any age who has been bred.
  • Mare's Month [Horse Racing] September. In theory, because mares that have not run well during the summer often "wake up" in September.
  • Margin [General] The amount a competitor in an event finishes in front of another competitor.
  • Margin Call [General] A call made by a bookmaker to the punter for cash to cover some or all of the punter's exposure to loss.
  • Margins [Greyhound Racing] The official distance between placed animals at finish of a race, expressed in lengths. A length is the average length of a horse - 2.4 metres. When the margins are small, the judge uses terms like Neck or Head.
  • Marina [Sailing] A place where boats can find fuel, water and other services. Marinas also contain slips where boats can stay for a period of time.
  • Mark [Wrestling] (noun) What a mark is usually depends on who you ask. It can be said that anybody who follows wrestling is a mark. Others will say that the only ones who are marks are those who buy into the illusion that wrestling is real. Since the number of people who fall into the latter category is almost non existent, the first definition is probably more accurate.
  • Marked Cards [Poker] Cards that have been altered so that their value can be read from the back.
  • Marked Deck [Poker] A deck with marked cards. Also called cheaters.
  • Marker [Golf] 1) An object that marks the forward limits of the teeing ground. 2) A scorer in stroke play, often a fellow competitor. 3) A ball marker 4) A rating marker.
  • Marker Points [Fencing] An old method of detecting hits using inked points.
  • Markers [Golf] The objects placed at the teeing round that indicate the area in which players must tee their balls.

N

  • N0 [Blackjack] The number of hands (sometimes expressed in hours of playing time) theoretically required to be played with a certain set of rules and strategy (count, spread etc.) before the player reaches his goal to be ahead by at least one standard deviation. It has been supported as a main measure of every situation's (rules & strategy) assessment mostly by Brett Harris. It is expressed as N0 = Var / EV^2.
  • N.C.I.S. [Skiing] National Coach and Instructor Scheme, the organisation that trains and certifies all Nordic ski instructors and coaches in Australia.
  • N/L [Poker] Shorthand, particularly in e-mail and Internet postings, for no-limit. "I was playing n/l h/e at the Pasatiempo last night, and this hand came up..."
  • Naban [Martial Arts] (Burma) A method of self-defense originary of India. There is no use of weapons in this category of self-defense systems which are also called Bando. Naban contains many elements of Indian wrestling.
  • Nagare [Martial Arts] Flow.
  • Nagashi [Martial Arts] Sweep
  • Nagashi Uke [Martial Arts] Flowing, sweeping block
  • Nagashi Zuki [Martial Arts] Punch with dodging
  • Nage [Martial Arts] Throw.
  • Nage Waza [Martial Arts] Defensive throwing techniques that make use of the attacker's momentum. Mainly judo.
  • Naginata [Martial Arts] "Reaping sword." A curved-blade spear, once used by Japanese monks and samurai. It is approximately seven feet in length including the blade. Many women of the samurai class became adept at the use of this weapon.
  • Nail [Poker] 1) Mark a card, often with a fingernail. Also called spike, spur. 2) Catch the specific card you need to win, particularly as the last card in hold 'em or seven-card stud. "I nailed an ace on the river." 3) Catch someone cheating.
  • Nail Down [Baseball] As in "nail down a victory." Refers to a relief pitcher finishing off the game.
  • Nail-Pricking [Poker] Marking cards with one's fingernails, particularly sharp thumbnails.
  • Naiwan [Martial Arts] Inner arm.
  • Nakago [Martial Arts] The tang; that portion of the sword blade to which the hilt is attached.
  • Nakhuna [Archery] An archer's ring, Central India.
  • Naluchie [Archery] Russian for bowcase.
  • Nalutsch [Archery] A type of Russian bowcase.
  • Name (Horse) [Horse Racing] Names of Thoroughbreds are registered by The Jockey Club. They can be no longer than 18 characters, including punctuation and spaces.
  • Name (Of a Thoroughbred) [Horse Racing] Names of North American Thoroughbreds are registered by The Jockey Club. They can be no longer than 18 characters, including punctuation and spaces. The words "the," "and," "by," "for," "in" and "a" are almost always lower case unless they are the first word in the name. Examples "Love You by Heart," "Go for Wand" and "Strike the Gold."
  • Name of the Game [Poker] In lowball, a wheel (that is, a lowball).
  • Named Insured [Motor Sports] The person or company that is designated as the insured.
  • Namesake, Part Ii [Baseball] There is one known grandfather-grandson combination in Notre Dame baseball history. Third baseman Dennis O'Keefe captained the Notre Dame baseball team in the early 1930s while O'Keefe's grandson, Pat O'Keefe, lettered as an outfielder with the Notre Dame baseball program in 1996 and '97.
  • Nami Ashi [Martial Arts] Ascending block with the leg
  • Naname Geri [Martial Arts] Foot thrust
  • Naotte [Martial Arts] A command to be at ease or relax.
  • Nap [General] A newspaper or sports journalist corrospondents best bet of the day.
  • Narande [Martial Arts] A command to line up.
  • Narrow the Field [Poker] To bet or raise in order to scare off other players whose hands are currently worse than yours, but have the potential to improve.
  • Nascar [Motor Sports] The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing. The sanctioning body for many racing series' including, but not limited to, Winston Cup, Busch Grand National, and Craftsman Supertruck. NASCAR creates and enforces rules to ensure that cars racing against each other are evenly matched and as safe as possible. NASCAR also establishes the racing schedule and location of races that determine the racing season.
  • Nasl [Soccer] North American Soccer League — an outdoor league formed in the U.S. in 1967 that attracted great international players including Pele and huge audiences to the U.S. in the 1970s; folded in 1985.
  • Nasogastric Tube [Horse Racing] A long tube that is capable of reaching from the nose to the stomach.
  • Nassau [Golf] A type of competition in which a point is awarded for winning the first nine holes, another point for winning the second nine, and a third point for winning the entire 18-hole round. Each point usually represents a separate bet.
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (Nhtsa) [Motor Sports] The federal agency that creates safety regulations for cars and trucks, crash-tests them, and analyzes safety-related defects that may require recalls.
  • National Lottery [Lotto] The name used for the Lottery of a particular country.
  • National Team [Soccer] A team consisting of the best players in a country chosen to represent it in international competitions such as the World Cup.
  • Natural [Poker] 1) A card that is not wild. 2) In a wild-card game, a hand that does not contain any wild cards. For example, in deuces wild, a natural straight, such as 10-J-Q-K-A, would have no deuces.
  • Natural Aids [Equestrian Sports] Subtle body signals given to the horse by the rider's seat, hands, and legs, as well as voice commands.
  • Natural Card [Poker] Natural (A card that is not wild.).
  • Natural Gas [Sailing] Short for compressed natural gas or CNG. A type of compressed gas used as fuel for stoves and heaters. CNG is stored in metal cylinders prior to use. CNG is considered safer than other types of fuel such as propane (LPG) because it is lighter than air and may rise into the sky in the event of a leak. Caution should still be used as CNG can collect near the cabin ceiling, potentially causing an explosion. Propane is available in more areas around the world than CNG so CNG is not often used outside of North America.
  • Natural Goal [Water Polo] A goal scored from open play with both teams at full strength. Excludes goals made on penalty shots or when a team is a man up.
  • Natural Jacks [Poker] Draw poker played with no antes or blinds.
  • Natural Selection [Lotto] A term used to differentiate from a Quick Pick. Natural selection is a fancy way of saying the player picked his own numbers. Example: "Was the winning ticket a quick pick or a natural selection?"
  • Naughty Forty [Bingo] 40
  • Nautical [Sailing] Having to do with boats, ships, or sailing.
  • Nautical Almanac [Sailing] An annually published book that contains information about the position of the sun, moon, planets and stars. This information is used for celestial navigation.
  • Nautical Mile [Sailing] Distance at sea is measured in nautical miles, which are about 6067.12 feet, 1.15 statute miles or exactly 1852 meters. Nautical miles have the unique property that a minute of latitude is equal to one nautical mile (there is a slight error because the earth is not perfectly round.) Measurement of speed is done in knots where one knot equals one nautical mile per hour. A statute mile is used to measure distances on land in the United states and is 5280 feet.
  • Navicular Bone [Horse Racing] A small, flat bone within the confines of the hoof that helps-along with the short pastern bone and the coffin bone-to make up the coffin joint.
  • Navicular Disease [Horse Racing] This is an ulcerated condition of a small bone called the navicular bone that lies across the rear of the hoof. It acts as a pulley for the flexor tendon. It is usually seen to affect both forelegs at the same time. The removal of the heel nerves is the usual method of treatment.
  • Navigable Water [Sailing] Water of sufficient depth to allow a boat to travel through it.
  • Navigation [Sailing] The act of determining the position of a boat and the course needed to safely move the boat from place to place.
  • Navigation Lights [Sailing] Lights on a boat help others determine its course, position and what it is doing. Boats underway should have a red light visible from its port bow, a green light on the starboard bow and a white light at its stern. Other lights are required for vessels under power, fishing, towing, etc.
  • Navigation Rules [Sailing] The rules concerning which vessel has the right of way if there is a possibility of collision between two or more boats. The United States Inland Rules of the Road and International Rules of the Road are slightly different.
  • Navigational Aid [Sailing] Any fixed object that a navigator may use to find his position, such as permanent land or sea markers, buoys, radiobeacons, and lighthouses.
  • Navigator [Sailing] The person responsible for navigating a boat.
  • Nawa [Wrestling] North American Wrestling Alliance
  • Nawf [Wrestling] North American Wrestling Federation
  • Nayin [Archery] A crossbow of the Mpangwe of the Gaboon River.
  • Nba [General] National Basketball Association.
  • Nba (National Basketball Association) [Basketball] A professional league created in 1949 that now has 27 teams in the U.S. and is adding 2 Canadian teams in 1995.
  • Nbj [Blackjack] An abbreviation for New Black Jack, a different system, which black jack players describe as a nonsense system.
  • Ncaa [Soccer] National Collegiate Athletic Association — governs and organizes sports at the collegiate level; has its own soccer committee.
  • Ncaa (National Collegiate Athletic Association) [Basketball] A voluntary association of over 1,000 colleges and universities in the U.S. whose role is to establish standards and protect the integrity of amateurism for student-athletes.
  • Ncaa Stat Champions [Baseball] Four Notre Dame players have ranked first in an official NCAA season statistic: Shaun Fitzmaurice (0.34 triples/gm, '64), Dan Peltier (32 doubles, '89) and Scott Sollmann (11 triples, '95) and Aaron Heilman (1.61 ERA, '98)
  • Ncaa Tournament [Basketball] An annual competition between 64 college teams to crown a national champion; also called March Madness because the three-week-long event is held during March; see also Final Four.
  • Nccw [Wrestling] North Coast Championship Wrestling
  • Ncw [Wrestling] National Championship Wrestling
  • Ndw [Wrestling] New Dimension Wrestling
  • Neap Tide [Sailing] The tide with the least variation in water level, occurring when the moon is one quarter and three quarters full. The lowest high tide and the highest low tide occur at neap tide. The opposite is the spring tide.
  • Near Fall [Wrestling] If a wrestler exposes the opponent's shoulders four inches or less above the mat or has one of the opponent's shoulders on the mat and the other at an angle of less than 45 degrees to the mat, it is a near fall, worth two technical points.
  • Near Fall Criteria/Near Fall Points [Wrestling] The criteria for earning a near fall is when the offensive wrestler has control of his opponent in a pinning situation and both shoulders or scapula of the defensive wrestler are held within four inches (or less) of the mat; OR when a shoulder or scapula is touching the mat and the other shoulder or scapula is at an angle of 45 degrees (or less) with the mat. The defensive wrestler's shoulders or scapula must be inbounds to earn near fall points. If this criteria is met for two continuos seconds, two points are earned. If this criteria is met for five continuos seconds, then three points are earned.
  • Near Fall Points [Wrestling] If near fall criteria is met for two continuous seconds, two points are earned. If near fall criteria is met for five continuous seconds, then three points are earned. Near Fall Points are also called "back points".
  • Near Post [Soccer] The goalpost closest to the ball.
  • Near Side [Horse Racing] The left side of a horse, the side on which a horse is mounted.
  • Near-Fall [Wrestling] Having had an opponent's back exposed long enough to get backpoints.
  • Nearly There [Bingo] 89
  • Necessary Line [Football] The imaginary line the offense must cross to achieve a new first down.
  • Neck [Horse Racing] A unit of measurement in racing about a quarter of a length, about the length of a race animal's neck.
  • Neck Strap [Luge] A strap attaching the helmet to the body or legs to help the slider support the head against high g-forces while going through curves.
  • Necw [Wrestling] New England Championship Wrestling
  • Needle [Poker] Anger by means of verbal abuse, often by application of sarcasm. "You're gonna get punched in the nose if you keep giving him the needle."
  • Needle Artist [Poker] One who regularly applies the needle (Anger by means of verbal abuse, often by application of sarcasm.) to others.
  • Needler [Poker] Needle artist (One who regularly applies the needle (Anger by means of verbal abuse, often by application of sarcasm.) to others.).
  • Needles [Poker] A pair of aces.
  • Neener [Poker] 9 (the card or the lowball hand)
  • Negative Equity [Motor Sports] The amount owed on a vehicle loan is greater than its market value.
  • Negative Progression [Roulette] Any system of wagering where you increase bets after a loss.
  • Negative Ski Base [Skiing] A patterned non-wax ski base that has an impregnated pattern, below the level of the base. See positive ski base also.
  • Negligence [Motor Sports] Failure to use a certain degree of care.
  • Neighborhood Games [Poker] Setting up your own game.
  • Neikya [Martial Arts] An advanced system of combat developed from Korean kwonbop.
  • Neko Ashi Dachi [Martial Arts] Cat stance
  • Nerf [Motor Sports] To bump lightly against another car, usually from behind and often on purpose, as a warning or a bit of psychology. Very common in NASCAR racing.
  • Nerve [Horse Racing] To remove a nerve, eliminating pain but not the infirmity that causes it. Illegal in major racing.
  • Nerved [Horse Racing] Operation that severs vital nerve to enable horses to race without pain. Illegal in most jurisdictions.
  • Nerving [Horse Racing] See neurectomy.
  • Nesmw [Wrestling] New Era Smoky Mountain Wrestling
  • Net [Soccer] Hemp, jute or nylon cord draped over the frame of the goal and extending behind it; also used to refer to the goal itself.
  • Net Losses [Video Poker] The amount lost after the wager is deducted from the payout.
  • Net Machine Income [Lotto] The money played at a video lottery terminal minus the prizes won at that terminal.
  • Net Score [Golf] The total number of shots taken after the handicap is deducted from the gross score.
  • Net Win [Keno] The actual player winnings, after deducting the cost of the ticket.
  • Net Winnings [Video Poker] The amount won after the wager is deducted from the payout.
  • Net" or "Let [Tennis] The call from the net-cord judge when a serve touches the top of the net.
  • Netlon [Horse Racing] Brand name for a plastic mesh which is mixed into the soil of a turf course. The grass roots grow around and through the mesh, helping to prevent divoting, especially in wet weather.
  • Netminder [Ice Hockey] The goaltender.
  • Neurectomy [Horse Racing] A surgical procedure in which the nerve supply to the navicular area is removed. The toe and remainder of the foot have feeling. Also referred to as "posterior digital neurectomy" or "heel nerve." Also known as "nerving."
  • Neutral [Motor Sports] A term drivers use when referring to how their car is handling. When a car is neither loose nor pushing (tight).
  • Neutral Corner [Boxing] One of the two corners in the ring that do not belong to either fighter.
  • Neutral Position [Wrestling] The position wrestlers take at the beginning of a match, standing and facing each other, but not in contact. Also known as standing position.
  • Neutral Site [General] Venue of a sporting event where neither side has a home field advantage.
  • Neutral Support [Cycling] Assistance that is given to a rider by someone other than a teammate. In road races and time trials, a follow truck carries a mechanic, spare tires, and other parts in order to offer neutral support to riders who have mechanical problems. In mountain bike racing, however, neutral support is against the rules and results in disqualification.
  • Neutral Throw [Water Polo] A throw by a referee that gives each team an equal chance to reach the ball. A neutral throw is most often used after a double foul.
  • Neutral Zone [Football] The region that contains the ball as it sits on the ground before each play; the area between the two lines of scrimmage.
  • Neuvieme [Fencing] An unconventional parry (#9) sometimes described as blade behind the back, pointing down (a variant of octave), other times similar to elevated sixte.
  • Nevada Gaming Commission [Keno] The body governing gambling in the state of Nevada.
  • Nevada Lettuce [Poker] A $1000 bill. Since such bills are no longer in circulation, the term is now rarely used.
  • Nevada Nickel [Poker] A $5 chip. (This term is rarely heard.)
  • Never Headed [Golf] Same as box to wire, all the way.
  • Never Prominent [Golf] Uneventful race, did not challenge leaders or other dogs.
  • Never Varied [Golf] Consistent style and/or speed throughout race in back of pack.
  • Neves [General] The price of 7-1.
  • New [Skydiving] The keyword within most skydiving circuits. To perform something new, something that hasn't been done before takes up a considerable amount of mental activity in the heads of many skydivers.
  • New Car Assessment Program (Ncap) [Motor Sports] One of several crash-test programs run by NHTSA. Cars are crashed head-on into a rigid barrier at 35 mph, and instrumented dummies measure crash forces endured by properly restrained occupants. NHTSA assigns each tested vehicle a score indicating the likelihood of moderate, severe or fatal injury.
  • New Spacer [Motor Sports] Term used for a new engine because it fills the space between the chassis and transmission.
  • Newa [Wrestling] New England Wrestling Alliance
  • Newspaper Line [General] The betting line which quite often appears in the daily newspapers. The lines are only approximate and quite often completely inaccurate and misleading.
  • Newtonian Physics [Croquet] Sir Isaac Newtons Laws of Motions still apply to todays croquet. Every action is accompanied by an equal and opposite reaction, so when blue is struck it moves off on a straight line forever, unless friction acts on the ball, thereby slowing the ball, or blue hits red, for instance, and the force that blue hits red determines the angle that the two balls separate and whether or not either of them go out of bounds.
  • Next-Two Leave [Croquet] A leave whereby the striker leaves his partner with a rush to the wicket and the opponents ball at each of the next two wickets.
  • Nf [Greyhound Racing] Naples-Ft. Myers
  • Nfc [General] National Football Confederation.
  • Nfl [General] National Football League (divided into American Football Conference and National Football Conference).
  • Nfl (National Football League) [Football] The major professional football league in the U.S. with 28 teams; its headquarters are in New York.
  • Nfl Championship [Football] The game held from 1933 through 1965 to decide the champion of professional football; renamed the Super Bowl in 1966.
  • Ng [Blackjack] An abbreviation for News Group, such as rec.gambling.blackjack or rec.gambling.blackjack.moderated.
  • Nga [Greyhound Racing] National Greyhound Association, made up of greyhound owners, breeders and trainers; recognized as a registry for racing greyhounds in the United States.
  • Nhl [General] National Hockey League (teams divided into Eastern Conference and Western Conference).
  • Nhra [Motor Sports] National Hot Rod Association. The senior association that sanctions several categories of drag races. The four professional divisions are Top Fuel, Pro Stock, Funny Car and Pro Stock Motorcycle.
  • Niblick [Golf] An iron with a round heavy head, used for getting out of bunkers. Correct usage: "Pass me the niblick so I can get off the beach." Incorrect usage: "May I niblick on your shoulder, baby?"
  • Niblick-Mashie [Golf] Archaic term for the #7 iron
  • Nick [Golf] Ype of shaft, developed by Rapport Composites, which utilizes a filament wound longer (main body) portion and a sheet wrapped tip section to tightly control bend and flex point.
  • Nickel [Poker] 1) $5 or a $5 poker chip. Also called a red or a redbird. 2) A 5. In high poker, three nickels means three 5s. 3) In lowball, having a 5 as the second highest card. A nickel 8 is an 8-5.Five dollars, usually represented by a red casino check.

O

  • O [Baseball] Universal suffix on the end of any Australian male's name when given praise or encouragement, such as "Top hit, Steve-o!" or "C'mon Rob-o, put it past him!" or "Great base running, Dave-o!"
  • O Goshi [Martial Arts] A basic hip throw.
  • O Guruma [Martial Arts] A wheel throw, on which the opponent is slung vertically around the attacker's waist.
  • O Sensei [Martial Arts] "Great teacher." The honorific prefix "o" attached the word sensei indicates respect and acknowledgement of the chief instructor of a system. Most commonly associated with Uyeshiba Morihei, founder of modern day Aikido.
  • O-Yumi [Archery] This indicates that the horse/s in question is excluded right from the barrier draw in Mobile or Standing Start Events (wherever applicable).
  • O.H.C. [Motor Sports] Overhead cam.
  • O.O.P. [Greyhound Racing] Abbreviation used in a greyhound's race chart that describes the greyhound as finishing Out Of Picture.
  • O.P. Smith [Golf] Owen Patrick Smith, inventor of a revolutionary mechanical lure, circa 1912, that could travel around a circular track; considered the “Father” of American greyhound racing.
  • Oaks [Greyhound Racing] A classic race restricted to three-year-old fillies.
  • Oar [Sailing] A stick with a blade at the end used to row a rowboat. Oars are different than paddles because they have a provision to be secured to the rowboat for rowing, such as an oarlock.
  • Oarlock [Sailing] A device to attach oars to a rowboat, allowing the operator to row rather than paddle the boat.
  • Oarsman [Rowing] A rower of either sex.
  • Ob [Poker] Open Blind (Game in which the player to the dealer's left blinds the pot, that is, puts in a bet equal to the limit of the game before receiving his cards.)
  • Oba [Baseball] On-base Against
  • Obi [Martial Arts] The sash that holds the jacket closed. (Judo)
  • Obi Goshi [Martial Arts] Throwing the opponent by grasping his belt or sash.
  • Object of Game [Blackjack] In Blackjack, to walk away from the table with more money than you started with, hopefully a lot more. Accomplished by beating the dealer consistently and not merely getting 21.
  • Objection [Horse Racing] A verbal or written statement against the eligibility of a horse for a particular race, or one made against the judge's placings in a race, after the all clear has been signalled (as opposed to a protest, in which the complaint is lodged before the all clear has been signalled).
  • Objection Sign [Horse Racing] A sign displayed on the tote board to indicate a foul has been claimed.
  • Oblique (Fracture) [Horse Racing] Fracture at an angle.
  • Obp [Baseball] (H + BB = HBP)/(AB + BB + HBP + SF)
  • Obp+Slug [Baseball] On-base percentage plus slugging percentage.
  • Obp+Slug (Ops) [Baseball] On-base percentage plus slugging percentage.
  • Obrb [Poker] 1) The term usually applies to a draw game, generally lowball, and is often shortened to OBRB. A game in which the first player to the dealer's left blinds the pot and the next player raises before getting his cards. Often called just raise blind. 2) This is usually part of a proposition. That is, one player asks another, "Open blind, raise blind?" This means, "If you open the pot blind, I will raise you blind."
  • Obrbrb [Poker] 1) The term usually applies to a draw game, generally lowball, and is often shortened to OBRBRB. A game in which the first player to the dealer's left blinds the pot, the next player raises blind before getting his cards, and the next player raises before getting his cards. Since this puts six bets into the pot before the cards are dealt, the effect is to increase the action of the game. Often shortened to re-raise, and sometimes called raise blind. 2) This is usually part of a proposition. A player who asks another, "open blind, raise blind, re-raise blind?" is saying, "I will open the pot blind and re-raise you back blind if you promise to raise blind."
  • Observed Position [Sailing] A position or fix determined by observing landmarks or other objects to find the position.
  • Observer [Golf] An official who watches golfers, usually on a specific section of the course, and reports any breach of rules to the referee.
  • Obstacle [Equestrian Sports] Any object that a horse must clear to complete the course in show jumping and the three-day event, such as a fence, gate, or water jump.
  • Obstruction [Field Hockey] Field hockey players may not use their sticks or bodies to prevent other players from hitting the ball. Doing so is obstruction. It's also obstruction if the goalkeeper lies on the ball. See also third-party obstruction.
  • Oca [General] Olympic Council of Asia.
  • Occulting Lights [Sailing] A navigational light which turns on and off in a regular pattern, but is on more than it is off. The opposite of a blinking light.
  • Occurrence [Motor Sports] Any event that resulted in a loss or damage to the insured or the insured's property.
  • Ocd Lesion [Horse Racing] A cartilaginous or bony lesion that is the result of a failure in development.
  • Ocean [Sailing] (1) The large body of salt water covering seven tenths of the earth. (2) The Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Arctic Oceans.
  • Ocho [Poker] 8; generally used to refer to the card, or, in lowball, to the rank of the hand (when it contains no pair), as determined by its largest card.
  • Ocir [Motor Sports] Orange County International Raceway.
  • Octane [Motor Sports] The hydrocarbon substance in gasoline that reduces engine knock or pinging, which is a noise caused by premature ignition of fuel in the cylinder combustion chamber. The higher the octane number, the less chance of premature ignition. High octane, which has a rating above 91, is useful only when recommended by the manufacturer.
  • Octave [Fencing] The eighth guard or parry, made in a low line on the sword-arm side with the wrist supinated.
  • Octohedral [Golf] Pattern of dimples on a ball comprised of four straight rows of dimples around the middle of the ball, with four around each pole. Small triangular arrays of dimples fill the remaining area on the ball. This creates 8 triangular groupings of dimples on the ball. This pattern was the predominant pattern prior to the 1970’s. The pattern may also be called attihedral.
  • Odachi [Martial Arts] See "tachi."
  • Odd Chip [Poker] When splitting a pot sometimes a chip is left over, usually of the smallest denomination for the game. That chip is called the odd chip, and various rules come into play to determine which player gets the chip.
  • Odd-Number Bet [Roulette] A wager that one of the odd numbers will win the next spin.
  • Odds [General] Chances of winning expressed in dollar (monetary) terms. Dividends displayed in dollar terms are inclusive of the unit of outlay. Odds can also be expressed in fractional terms showing the ratio of Win to Stake. Example: The New Zealand All Blacks to win the Rugby World Cup shows a dividend of $5. In fractional terms they would be quoted at 4/1 - for a stake (bet) of 1 unit you win 4 units for a total return of 5 units.
  • Odds (All Odds against) [General] Percentage/Probability
  • Odds against [General] When the bookmaker's or totalisator's stake is greater than the investor's stake. For example, a horse that is quoted at 4-1 would be odds against, because if it wins a race, the bookmaker or totalisator returns $4 for every dollar an investor places on that horse, plus his or her original outlay.
  • Odds against-Odds on [General] Represent the chances of any particular horse as quoted by the bookmakers. If a horse is quoted at 6/1 against its chance is 1 in 7, if it is 6 to 1 on, the chances of success are 6 in 7.
  • Odds Assessor [General] Bookmaker.
  • Odds Bets [Craps] An additional wager on come, don't come, place, and don't place bets after the come-out roll. This is called to wager behind. You can wager behind x times the amount you could win, where x is the number of odds allowed. If you are playing craps with 2x odds it looks like this: you bet $10, you could win $20 and hence wager $40 behind. Some casinos offer up to 100x odds. To wager behind is what a good craps player will do and a criteria of a good craps game is how many odds the casino offers you. As the amount of allowed odds increases, the house advantage decreases considerably. When making the odds bet 1x the house edge is 0.85% / 0.68% (pass / don't pass). When making the odds bet 2x the house edge is cut down to 0.61% / 0.45% already.
  • Odds Board [Horse Racing] A large signboard in the infield in front of the grandstand where the odds are posted, usually in lights. Other information may be listed, all part of the tote board.
  • Odds Compiler [General] The person working for the bookmaker who sets the odds following research and his own feelings.
  • Odds Layer [General] The person working for a bookmaker who sets the odds. The odds layer is usually an expert on one or two sports and concentrates entirely on setting the odds for those sports.
  • Odds Off [Craps] Odd bets that are "not working". Odd bets can be called "off" by the player at any time, but are left on the felt until the bet is resolved. Also, come odds bets are usually "off" during the come out roll, unless the bettor asks to have the odds bets "working". Come odd bets that are "off" will be returned to the player if the line bet loses on the come out roll. Don't come odds generally work on the come-out roll.
  • Odds on [General] When the resulting dividend will be less than an investor's stake, meaning the bookmaker or totalisator returns a smaller stake. For example, placing a winning $1 bet on a horse that is 2-1 on would give the investor 50 cents plus his or her original dollar, making a total return of $1.50 for the $1 outlay.
  • Odds on Favorite [General] A horse, team or individual so favored by the public that the odds are less than even.
  • Odds-against [General] Describes the odds when the amount you receive for a winning bet, not including your returned stake, is more than the amount you staked.
  • Odds-Maker [General] A person who sets the line.
  • Odds-on [General] Describes the odds when the amount you receive for a winning bet, not including your returned stake, is less than the amount you stake. For example you stake Ł1 at 8/13 (13/8 on) and receive Ł1.62, made up of your Ł1 stake and 62p winnings.
  • Odds-on Favorite [General] A team or athlete so heavily favored that the odds are less than even
  • Oddsmaker [General] A person who sets the line.
  • Odm [Horse Racing] Outside draw mobiles. Horses which are required to requalify before competing again in registered races, may also be excluded from the barrier draw for future events and classified ODM, which means it will automatically be drawn in an outside barrier (such as barrier ten off the second row). A trainer may also request that a horse be declared ODM if they believe it is in the best interests of the horse and other runners.
  • Odometer [Motor Sports] Indicates the number of miles a vehicle has been driven. It is illegal to tamper with the odometer reading.
  • Odometer Rollback [Motor Sports] The illegal practice of rolling a vehicle's odometer back to indicate that it traveled fewer miles than it actually has.
  • Odometer Rollover [Motor Sports] Occurs when the vehicle's mileage exceeds the mechanical limits of the odometer - usually 99,999 miles. This must be certified by the seller, under the Truth in Mileage Act.
  • Odori [Martial Arts] (Japanese) The name of the typical dances of Okinawa. These dances contain many movements used in the daily movements of the peasants during their work.
  • Ods [Horse Racing] Outside draw stands. (Similar to ODM, but in relation to standing start events).
  • Oem (Original Equipment Manufacturer) [Golf] A golf club company that, as its main concern, sells completed clubs either on the wholesale level or to the general public.
  • Ofa [Baseball] Outfield Assists
  • Off [Craps] [1] An oral call by a player that certain of his bets will not be working on the next roll of the dice, such as place wagers. [2] A term signifying that certain bets on the layout will not be working on a come-out roll, such as place bets and odds bets on come numbers.
  • Off Bell [Horse Racing] The bell that rings at the start of a race, shutting off the betting.
  • Off Camber Turn [Motor Sports] A corner with negative banking (the inside edge of the corner is higher than the outside edge). Seldom if ever seen on ovals, but some road courses have them.
  • Off Keel [Rowing] Descriptive of an unbalanced boat.
  • Off Line [Motor Sports] Driving off the best racing line. Drivers will go off line to attempt a pass or to move out of the way of faster cars.
  • Off Lines [General] The difference of amount the Las Vegas pointspread has compared with the computerized mathematical line.
  • Off Road [Motor Sports] The right side of a horse.
  • Off Slow [Golf] Broke several strides behind the rest of the field.
  • Off the ... [Croquet] When a ball scores a wicket off another ball, it is off the red.
  • Off the Board [General] Term used to signify that the bookmaker is not accepting bets on a particular event.
  • Off the Boards [General] A situation in which bookmakers will accept no further action.
  • Off the Dribble [Basketball] A shot taken while driving to the basket.
  • Off the Map [General] A horse which has been sensationally backed is referred to as being backed off the map. This means numerous investors have placed substantial bets on that particular horse, resulting in a dramatic decrease in odds.
  • Off the Pace [Horse Racing] To run behind the early leaders.
  • Off the Street [Poker] Pertaining to winning a hand very early in a playing session, often by having been dealt very good cards. If you sit down at a newly-vacated seat, and, within a few minutes raise with a good hand, get a lot of action, and win a big pot, someone is sure to say, "Right off the street
  • Off the Wind [Sailing] Sailing with the wind coming from the stern or quarter of the boat.
  • Off Track [Horse Racing] An off track refers to a wet racing surface.
  • Off Wing [Ice Hockey] A wing who is on the side opposite that on which he usually plays, or shoots from the "wrong side" for his position; e.g., a left wing stationed on the right wing or a right-handed shooter playing left wing.
  • Off-Centre [Golf] A poor hit.
  • Off-Course [General] Away from the racecourse or event. This covers bookmakers operating retail outlets, telephone and internet services.
  • Off-Line Game [Lotto] A game that does not require the use of a computer terminal for purchase. Instant and passive games are examples of off-line games.
  • Off-Piste [Skiing] Any non-pisted area of skiable, and also un-patrolled snow. See also piste.
  • Off-Shore [General] Bookmakers who are based outside the UK. There are three types of off-shore bookmakers - firstly, those that are the off-shore site run by an existing British bookmaker; secondly, those that are existing off-course bookmakers in another country, often Ireland; and the third type are internet and/or telephone bookmakers set up specifically to conduct off-shore business.
  • Off-Suit [Poker] Not of the same suit, especially in reference to hole cards. Sometimes abbreviated to just "off. "I'll play KT off suit occasionally, but never in early position.
  • Off-Suited [Poker] Not of the same suit, especially in reference to hole cards. Sometimes abbreviated to just "off. "I'll play KT off suit occasionally, but never in early position.
  • Off-Track [Horse Racing] A racing surface that is not fast - muddy, sloppy, holding, binding or soft.
  • Off-Track Betting [Horse Racing] Wagering at legalized betting outlets usually run by the tracks, management companies specializing in parimutuel wagering, or, in New York State, by independent corporations chartered by the state. Wagers at OTB sites are usually commingled with on-track betting pools.
  • Offending Team [Football] The team that committed a foul.
  • Offense [Soccer] The function of trying to score goals.
  • Offensive Board [Basketball] 1) The backboard behind the basket a team is shooting at. 2) An offensive rebound.
  • Offensive Foul [Basketball] A personal foul committed by an offensive player. In the National Basketball Association and international amateur play, the ball is awarded to the opposing team for a throw-in. In college and high school play, an offensive foul is treated like a defensive foul, unless it's committed by the player handling the ball. See player control foul.
  • Offensive Player [Soccer] See Attacker.
  • Offensive Rebound [Basketball] A rebound of a teammate's shot, or of one's own shot.
  • Offensive Team [Basketball] The team in possession of the ball.
  • Offensive Winning Percentage (Owp) [Baseball] The Winning Percentage a team of nine Fred McGriffs (or anybody) would compile against average pitching and defense. The formula: (Runs Created per 27 outs) divided by the League average of runs scored per game. Square the result and divide it by (1+itself).
  • Offensive Wrestler [Wrestling] The offensive wrestler is the wrestler which maintains a position in which he controls and maintains restraining power over his opponent. The offensive wrestler is typically referred to as the "top man".
  • Offensive Zone [Ice Hockey] The attacking zone.
  • Office [Poker] To give someone a signal; usually implies a secret signal between thieves or scammers, sometimes letting a partner know the holdings of another player (in which case the signal is also known as a sign).
  • Office Hours [Poker] 1) In high poker, two pair, 9s and 5s or 8s and 4s. 2) In lowball, a 9-5 hand. 3) In any high poker game, a full house involving 9s and 5s or 8s and 4s. 4) A straight, 5 to 9. 5) A straight, 4 to 8.
  • Official [Horse Racing] The designation given to the result of a race by the stewards/racing judges when any occurrences that affected the actual order of finish have been decided in terms of pari-mutuel payoffs to winning bettors.
  • Official Game Clock [Soccer] The clock that the referee carries with him on the field so he can signal when each half is over; does not stop during the game, even when play does.
  • Official Line [General] The line that the bookmaker uses for wagering purposes. The line which comes from Las Vegas is quite often referred to as the official line; however, the line that your bookie offers you is actually your "official line". Many smart bettors like to know the Las Vegas official line so that they can compare to their local bookies in order to determine how badly they are being "faded".
  • Official Margins [Horse Racing] The length each horse in a race finished behind the winner, as determined by the judge. Official margins between the first and second placegetter, and second and third placegetter, are displayed for public viewing at the paceway.
  • Official Results [Horse Racing] See official.
  • Official Scorer [Ice Hockey] An official who keeps a record of the game, including goals scored and the time of each score, players credited with goals and assists, and substitutions.
  • Official Swingweight Scale [Golf] A type of swingweight scale that uses a 12” fulcrum as its measuring point, providing balance in ounces and total weight in ounces or grams. Not typically used in many shops.
  • Officials [Soccer] The referee and 2 linesmen who work together to make sure the game is played according to the rules of soccer; responsible for stopping and restarting play, keeping track of the score and the time remaining and citing violations of the rules, called fouls; they wear uniforms that distinguish them from the players on both teams.
  • Offset [Motor Sports] Metal edges that are slightly protruding from the sidewall of a ski (but not the base) to allow for sharpening and tuning without damaging the sidewall.
  • Offset Skating [Skiing] Also known as uphill two-skating, or open-field skating, or offset V-skating,or V-1 off-timing, this is two skating with a staggered (offset) pole plant on one side.
  • Offshore [Sailing] Away from land, toward the water. See inland.
  • Offshore Wind [Sailing] Wind that is blowing away from the land, towards the water.
  • Offside [Rugby] A violation committed when a player crosses the gain line during a lineout, maul, ruck, or scrum before it has been completed, or when a player is in front of the ball while it is played by a teammate. A penalty is called if an offside player then plays the ball, obstructs or tackles an opponent, or is within 10 meters of an opponent waiting for the ball. The other side is awarded a penalty kick from the spot of infringement or a scrum at the place where the offending side last played the ball. See also accidentally offside.
  • Offside Pass [Ice Hockey] See two-line pass.
  • Offside Position [Soccer] An attacking player positioned so that fewer than 2 opposing defensive players (usually the goalie and 1 other defender) are between him and the goal he is attacking; a player is not offside if he is exactly even with one or both of these defensive players.
  • Offsides [Ice Hockey] A violation which occurs when both skates of an attacking player cross the opponent’s blue line preceding the puck into the attacking zone or when a pass crosses more than one line without being touched (two-line pass); this is one of the most common calls made in a hockey game.
  • Offstrided [Golf] Momentarily loses natural stride.
  • Ogier [Poker] The jack of spades.
  • Oh Shit! Hand [Poker] A hand on which a player has wagered his last chips and over which the player exclaims, "Oh shit!", ostensibly because he has missed his draw, but usually because he is trying to lure unwary flies into his web. Oh shit! hands are usually beat only by going home hands.
  • Oi Zuki [Martial Arts] Forward lunge puch (same side arm and leg)
  • Oil (E.G. 10w-30) [Motor Sports] Engine oil comes in various ratings: SAE 5W-30, 10W-30, 10W-40, etc. For example, a 10W-30 rated oil will flow like a light SAE 10-weight oil at low temperatures. The "W" signifies that it is a "winter" rated oil. The "30" designation means that at engine operating temperatures, the oil will behave like a heavier SAE 30-weight oil. Low viscosity at colder temperature allows the oil to circulate more quickly and protect vital engine parts. Higher oil viscosity at elevated temperatures prevents direct metal-to-metal contact.
  • Oil Modified Polyurethane [Golf] Type of polyurethane used by most clubmakers, it cures from the bottom layer of finish to the top. Characterized by its slight amber color, it requires no special humidity-controlled conditions.
  • Oil Pump [Motor Sports] An engine-driven pump that delivers oil, under pressure, to the engine's moving parts.
  • Oil Ring [Motor Sports] The lowermost piston ring that scrapes off excess oil from the cylinder walls and returns it to the oil pan via vents in the ring and piston.
  • Oil, Synthetic [Motor Sports] Oil that is not derived from raw petroleum. Synthetic oil has superior engine protection properties compared to conventional mineral oil. Synthetic oil costs 3-5 times more than mineral oil.
  • Oiled (Oiling) [Horse Racing] Administration of mineral oil via nasogastric tube to relieve gas or pass blockage. Preventative procedure commonly used in long van rides to prevent impaction with subsequent colics. See colic.

P

  • P [Motor Sports] Prototype - Fastest class in sports car racing.
  • P3 [Horse Racing] Third phalanx. See coffin bone.
  • P21 [Blackjack] A rule whereby you push if the dealer has a natural and you have 21 in three or more cards.
  • P&G [Motor Sports] Basically, the procedure for checking the cubic-inch displacement of an engine. The term comes from the manufacturer of the particular gauge used.
  • P.B.D./C. [Horse Racing] Preferential Barrier Draw On Country Assessment: Indicates the computer shall draw for the lowest Country assessed horse/s progressively up to the highest Country assessed horse/s.
  • P.B.D./C.a. [Horse Racing] Preferential Barrier Draw On Country Age Assessment: Indicates the computer shall draw for the lowest Country Age assessed horse/s progressively up to the highest Country Age assessed horse/s.
  • P.B.D./M.a: [Horse Racing] Preferential Barrier Draw On Metropolitan Age Assessment: Indicates the computer shall draw for the lowest Metropolitan Age assessed horse/s progressively up to the highest Metropolitan Age assessed horse/s.
  • P.B.D./M: [Horse Racing] Preferential Barrier Draw On Metropolitan Age Assessment: Indicates the computer shall draw for the lowest Metropolitan assessed horse/s progressively up the highest Metropolitan assessed horse/s.
  • P.C. [Roulette] The house edge expressed as a percentage.
  • P.D. [Horse Racing] Preferential Draw: Means that the Barrier Draw for this event shall be effected by Preferential Draw (PD). PD usually means the that the slowest assessed horses may be drawn from the inside to the outside. In all cases horses which are excluded from the draw ODS or ODM, RODS or RODM shall be drawn to the outside.
  • P.D.a. [Horse Racing] Preferential Draw on Age: Indicates the computer shall draw for the youngest age first.
  • P.D.H.D. [Horse Racing] Preferential Draw Handicappers Discretion: Indicates the handicapper will apply a form of barrier draw for the computer to complete.
  • P.D.L.T.W. [Horse Racing] Preferential Draw on Lifetime Wins: Indicates the computer shall draw for the least number of wins first progressively up to the most number of wins.
  • P.D.S. [Horse Racing] Preferential Draw on Sex: Indicates the computer shall draw for fillies and mares first and other horses draw for thereafter.
  • P.D.T.S.W. [Horse Racing] Preferential Draw on this Season's Wins: Indicates the computer shall draw for the least number of wins this season first progressively up to the most number of wins this season.
  • P.D.T.S.W.$ [Horse Racing] Preferential Draw This Season Win Prizemoney: Indicates the computer shall draw for the lowest Winning prizemoney this season. First progressively up to the highest winning prizemoney this season.
  • P.D.W.$ [Horse Racing] Preferential Draw Lifetime Win Prizemoney: Indicates the computer shall draw for the lowest Winning prizemoney first progressively up to the highest winning prizemoney.
  • P.D.W.$ - 2yo$ [Horse Racing] Preferential Draw Lifetime Win Prizemoney - 2YO Win Prizemoney: indicates the computer shall draw the lowest Winning prizemoney minus 2YO Winning prizemoney first progressively up to the highest Winning prizemoney minus 2YO winning prizemoney.
  • P.D.W.C. [Horse Racing] Preferential Draw Within Conditions: Indicates the computer will ignore 2YO wins in a horse's career when effecting a barrier draw that excludes 2YO wins.
  • P.R.B.T. [Horse Racing] Pre Race Blood Test: Indicates this horse was subject to a random blood test prior to his/her race.
  • P/Gs [Baseball] Pitches per Start
  • P/Ip [Baseball] Pitches per Innings Pitched
  • Pa [Baseball] (AB + BB + HBP + SF + SH + defensive interference)
  • Pa Kua [Martial Arts] "Eight trigrams." One of three internal methods of kung fu. It is composed of various circling and linear postures named after and based on the movements of the snake, stork, dragon, hawk, lion, monkey and bear.
  • Pa* [Baseball] The divisor for On Base Percentage: At Bats plus Walks plus Hit By Pitcher plus Sacrifice Flies; or Plate Appearances minus Sacrifice Hits and Times Reached Base on Defensive Interference.
  • Pa-Kua (Ba-Gua; Chinese) [Martial Arts] Chinese Martial Art
  • Pa/So [Baseball] Plate Appearances per Strikeout
  • Paaf [General] Pakistan Amateur Athletics Federation
  • Pabbf [General] Pakistan Amateur Basketball Federation.
  • Pace [Poker] The speed of a game, with respect to its action. Fast pace describes a game with a lot of betting and raising, performed by most of the players; slow pace describes a game without much betting and raising.
  • Pace Car [Motor Sports] Seen at NASCAR and Indy races, the pace car leads race cars out of the pole position at beginning of races or after a yellow flag or restart has been called.
  • Pace Lap [Motor Sports] The lap before the official start, on which cars travel in formation, usually behind a pace car, building up speed so they'll be near top speed when they reach the starting line.
  • Pace Line [Cycling] A group of riders, usually in an echelon, who take turns setting the pace so that the others can draft on the leader.
  • Pacer [Motor Sports] A driver who travels at pretty much the same speed throughout the race, conserving his car in the hope that those traveling faster will be forced to drop out with mechanical problems.
  • Pacesetter [Horse Racing] The horse that is running in front (on the lead).
  • Pachigi [Martial Arts] A Korean martial art in which the head is used to butt an opponent.
  • Pacing [Horse Racing] Pacing is a 'laterial' gait in which the horse moves the legs on the same side back and forward together. Most pacers wear 'hopples' - straps connecting the legs on the same side. Pacing, or 'ambling', is a natural gait for some breeds of horse (as well as giraffes and camels) and is faster than trotting by roughly 3 seconds per mile. Pacers are also less likely to 'break', so they are more popular with punters than trotters, where the two gaits exist. As a result pacing dominates harness racing in the English-speaking world.
  • Pack [Blackjack] A reference to the total collection of cards in play. Usually, this is used to refer to more than one deck of cards, with it's most common reference being use to describe a two deck game.
  • Pack Job [Skydiving] The way a canopy is folded and placed into the container. Also a service performed by specialized packers for hire at some dropzones and boogies.
  • Package Shelf [Motor Sports] The ledge between the rear seat and the backlight (or rear windshield). The name is misleading because it's a bad idea to put anything on the package shelf. However, it often contains the sound system's rear speakers and, on some vehicles, the CHMSL or center brake light. Sometimes also called the package tray. On European cars the package tray often contains a first-aid kit; on higher-end models it may contain storage compartments.
  • Packed House [Poker] Full house.
  • Packed Powder [Skiing] Powder snow that has either settled under its own weight, or compressed into a firm surface.
  • Packet [Poker] Any portion of a deck of cards.
  • Pad [Fencing] A soft protective cushion inside the guard.
  • Pad Eye [Sailing] A small fitting with a hole used to guide a line.
  • Pad Save [Ice Hockey] A save on which the goalie uses a leg pad to stop or deflect the puck.
  • Paddle [Table Tennis] The table tennis paddle must be made primarily of wood. There are no restrictions as to size. A legal rubber sheet must be applied to any side used for striking the ball. One side must be black, the other cherry red. If there is a non-hitting side with no rubber sheet attached, it must have a paint sheet of the appropriate color.
  • Paddock [Horse Racing] Approximately 25 minutes before they race, horses are brought from the barn area to the Paddock. They are led to a row of stalls where they are inspected and identified by track officials, ensuring that the correct horses run in the race. After they have been inspected, the horses are saddled and led to a walking ring where owners, trainers and jockeys await them.
  • Paddock Area [Motor Sports] The enclosed portion (or infield) of a race track.
  • Paddock Judge [Horse Racing] In horse racing, the racing official responsible for getting jockeys and horses in order to go to the starting gate; also checks the equipment used by each horse and supervises the saddling of the horses. In greyhound racing, the racing official responsible for supervising the leadouts, identifying greyhounds, and checking muzzles and blankets.
  • Padling/Paddling [Skiing] The Scandinavian's preferred term for two skating.
  • Pai Gow Poker Dictionary [Poker] A banking game based on the Asian tile game pai gow, in which players arrange groups of tiles into two hands, which then compete severally each against the two hands played by the banker. In the card version, each player makes a wager, and then receives seven cards, which he arranges into two hands, one consisting of five cards and one of two, with the stipulation that the five-card hand must rank higher than the two-card hand. These hands, after being set (arranged), are then placed in front of the player, and then compete, one at a time, as in a blackjack game, against the banker hand (which can be held by a player or the house). If both player hands beat the dealer hand, the player wins; if both banker hands beat the player hand, the dealer wins; otherwise it is a push. If either hand is exactly the same, that counts as a win for the banker, which gives the banker hand a slight edge. The banker hand competes against player hands in an order determined by the shaking of a number of dice. (This gives the game its alternative name of shake-shake.) This order is important, because if the banker loses his stake prematurely, not all player hands may get to compete. The house makes its money by always extracting a certain fee from every player bet, prior to the actual playing of the hands (and often takes that fee whether or not the hand is even played). Apart from the rankings of the hands being the same as in poker, pai gow poker is not really poker. Also called double hand or double-hand poker.
  • Pai Shih [Martial Arts] A ceremony for a kung fu novice denoting his acceptance as a disciple.
  • Paint [Poker] 1) Face card (King, Queen and Jack). 2) Daub (Markings put on cards with paint, ink, or some other fluid.). 3) In lowball, catch a face card (on the draw). "Paired and painted and nearly fainted" means, drawing two (or more cards), a player paired one of his original cards and also caught a face card, and now he's complaining about his luck; such a catch in lowball is the ultimate insult (and should teach the player not to draw more than one card).
  • Paint Cards [Poker] King, Queen and Jack; face cards; court cards; picture cards.
  • Paint Sheet [Table Tennis] Not paint at all, but a sheet of colored plastic used to cover the non-hitting side of the paddle.
  • Painted [Poker] In lowball, having caught a face card (on the draw). "I painted."
  • Painted Waterline [Sailing] A painted line on the side of a boat at the waterline. The color usually changes above and below the waterline as the boat is painted with special antifouling paint below the waterline.
  • Painter [Sailing] A line attached to the bow of a dinghy and used to tie it up or tow it.
  • Painting the Black [Baseball] When a pitcher throws the ball over the edge of the plate.
  • Paintskin [Poker] 1) Face card (King, Queen and Jack).
  • Pair [Poker] 1) Two cards of the same rank in the same poker hand (or part of the community cards in hold 'em-type games). "I have a pair of kings." 2) One pair. 3) In various forms of draw poker, to catch a pair, when drawing to some other hand. In high draw, you can draw to a straight or flush and pair, which means you missed the hand. In lowball, you can draw to any hand and pair (which also means you missed). "I was drawing to a bicycle, but I paired.
  • Pair of Aces in the Wrong Places [Craps] Two.
  • Pair of Shorts [Poker] In high draw poker, a small pair; often any pair less than jacks; any pair smaller than the opening requirements for the game.
  • Pair of Sunflowers [Craps] Betting that the next roll will be the total sum of 10 (5&5).
  • Pair Up [Poker] In lowball, to draw to a hand and pair one of your original cards.
  • Pair-a-Roses [Craps] Betting that the next roll will be the total sum of 10 (5&5).
  • Pairings [Golf] Groups of two players.
  • Pairs [Lotto] Usually a three-digit-number bet that includes only the first two digits, last two digits, and in some cases the first and last digit of a three-digit number. Examples: if 123 is drawn, 12 is the Front Pair, 23 the back pair and 13 the middle or split pair. There are 100 pairs of each type and the odds of seeing any one of them are 1 in 100.
  • Pak Salto [Gymnastics] A high bar move in which the gymnast releases the bar, does a backward flip, and catches the low bar. Named for North Korean gymnast Gyong Sil Pak, who created it.
  • Pallas [Poker] The queen of spades.
  • Pallette [General] The flat paddle used on the baccarat tables to scoop the cards.
  • Palm [Poker] Perform the cheating maneuver of removing one or more cards from the table (for the purpose of introducing them later) or chips surreptitiously from a pot (that is, steal the chips) by the expedient of covering and concealing them with the hand.
  • Palm Stock [Poker] Two or more cards, arranged in a specific order, held out by a thief for later introduction into the game.
  • Palmed Card [Poker] A card that was removed from the table, or introduced into the game later, by a thief, by the expedient of covering and concealing it with his hand.
  • Palmer [Horse Racing] Back of the front limb from the knee down.
  • Palming [Basketball] A violation in which a player moves his hand under the ball and scoops it while dribbling. Also: carrying the ball.
  • Palmok [Martial Arts] Forearm or wrist.
  • Palooka [Poker] Poor player. In general (no poker) usage, this term has a wider but similar application, referring to an athlete (often a boxer) of limited capabilities, or, even more generally, any inept person
  • Pan [Poker] 1) Panguingue. 2) Three 3s, 5s, or 7s, or, sometimes, J-Q-K of spades. This usage usually comes up in a lowball game, when one player shows another his unplayable hand, says, "Pan," and then pulls out his three 5s, or other paying pan combination
  • Pan Pan [Sailing] An urgent message used on a radio regarding the safety of people or property. A PAN PAN message is not used when there is an immediate threat to life or property, instead the MAYDAY call is used. PAN PAN situations may develop into MAYDAY situations. As with a MAYDAY, PAN PAN messages have priority on the radio channels and should not be interrupted. In the case of a less urgent safety message, such as a hazard to navigation, the appropriate signal to use is SECURITE.
  • Panah [Archery] A bow, Malaysia.
  • Panel [Horse Racing] A slang term for a furlong.
  • Panguingue [Poker] A game resembling gin rummy played with eight decks of cards, some of the melds of which are worth payments from active players; pronounced pan-GHEE-nee, and usually shortened to pan. The game is played in many California card rooms and a few Nevada casinos.
  • Panhard Bar [Motor Sports] In a Stock car rear suspension, a lateral bar that prevents the axle from moving left or right. It is generally attached to the end of the axle housing on the left, and to a frame bracket on the right.(Also referred to as a track bar)
  • Pankration [Martial Arts] "Game of all powers." An early Greek sport developed as a combination of earlier native forms of boxing and wrestling.
  • Papegay [Archery] See Popinjay.
  • Paper [Poker] 1) Cards. "Nice paper" (used only as a spoken expression, often sarcastic) means "Good hand." (Even though most card rooms use plastic decks, players rarely say "Nice plastic.") 2) Marked cards. 3) Bad checks. Passing paper means writing bad checks
  • Paper Hanger [Poker] One who deliberately writes and passes bad checks.
  • Paper Work [Poker] Marked cards.
  • Paper Worker [Poker] A cheat who uses marked cards.
  • Papers [Poker] Marked cards.
  • Papers of Origin [Motor Sports] Manufacturer documents used to obtain vehicle titles.
  • Papuren [Martial Arts] (Japanese) Also called Paipuren or Happoren. Papuren is a Kata of the Bai-He-Quan. Novadays known in many Karate styles.
  • Par [Golf] The number of strokes, designated for each hole, that represents a standard of good performance. The par figures for individual holes are added up to represent par for a course. Par is generally based on the length of a hole from the tee to the green, although adjustments may be made for configuration of the ground, severity of hazards, and other difficult or unusual conditions. See the following entries.
  • Par 3 [Golf] A par 3 hole is up to 250 yards in length for men, 210 yards for women.
  • Par 4 [Golf] A par 4 hole is 250 to 471 yards in length for men, 211 to 400 yards for women.
  • Par 5 [Golf] A par 5 hole is more than 470 yards in length for men, more than 401 yards for women.
  • Par Competition [Golf] A game in which play is against a fixed score for each hole (called the par or bogey). Scoring is as in match play with plus 1 if the player scores better than par, equal if he scores par and minus 1 if more than par. The player with the highest aggregate score is the winner.
  • Par Terre [Wrestling] A re-starting position in which a wrestler is on the mat, on hands and knees, and the other wrestler kneels beside him, with both hands on his back. (French for "on the ground.")
  • Parachute [Sailing] Sometimes used to describe a spinnaker.
  • Parachute Flare [Sailing] An emergency signal flare that will float down on a parachute after launch, hopefully improving its visibility.
  • Parachutist [Skydiving] A person who uses a parachute. A Parachutist is not necessarily a Skydiver. A Skydiver is only a Parachutist because they have to be. Note for non-jumpers: do not call a Skydiver a Parachutist and don't ask them about 'their Parachuting'.
  • Parade Lap [Motor Sports] A lap taken by cars at slow speed, before the pace lap, to give spectators a good view of them.
  • Parade Lap(s) [Motor Sports] The warm-up lap before a race. Drivers use this lap to warm up their engines and often zig-zag to warm up tires.
  • Parallax Error [Sailing] Error that can be introduced when not reading an instrument directly from its front, due to the separation of the indicator and the scale being read.
  • Parallel Bars [Gymnastics] 1) A piece of apparatus consisting of two bars, each 195 centimeters high and 350 centimeters long, and positioned 42 to 52 centimeters apart. 2) A men's event performed on the apparatus. A routine is made up mostly of swing and flight elements, including at least one release move, which includes a release and a re-grasp.
  • Parallel Oxer [Equestrian Sports] An obstacle that has front and back rails of equal height, set wide apart to produce a spread.
  • Parallel Rules [Sailing] A navigational tool used to move a line on a chart from one location to another without changing its angle, such as when moving a plotted course to a compass rose. Parallel rules are two straight edges that are mechanically connected such that both edges always remain parallel. Lines can then be "walked" across a flat chart.
  • Parallel Tip Section [Golf] Section of shaft toward the tip that exhibits one constant diameter up to the first step.
  • Parallel Tip Shaft [Golf] The type of shaft construction in which the shaft has one constant diameter in its tip section. .370” is a common tip size for parallel tip iron shafts, while .335” is common for wood shafts. Parallel tip shafts can often be used in any club in a set; the same shaft can be used to assemble a #1 iron or an SW. Parallel tip shafts are favored by clubmakers, although a number of OEM’s use them as well.
  • Parallel Turn [Skiing] A turn in which the skis are kept parallel to each other.
  • Parallel Turning [Skiing] Turning with the skis remaining parallel throughout each turn.
  • Parallels [Sailing] Latitude lines.
  • Parcel [Sailing] Material wrapped around a line to prevent chaffing.
  • Pari Mutuel [Greyhound Racing] See totalisator.
  • Pari-Mutuel [Greyhound Racing] Wagering Taken from the French term meaning "betting between ourselves," wagering in which winnings are taken from the total amount of money. The system insures that you never wager "against the track" but only against other players. The track acts as your agent and collects a percentage as fixed by Rhode Island law. This form of wagering offers better odds of winning. Approximately 80% of all wagered money is returned to the public in the form of winnings. The Rhode Island Department of Business Regulations, Division of Racing & Athletics has adopted a comprehensive set of rules regarding each different type of wagering pool.
  • Pari-Mutuel Wagering [Greyhound Racing] Taken from the French term meaning "betting between ourselves", wagering in which winnings are taken from the total amount of money. The system insures that you never wager "against the track" but only against other players.
  • Pari-Mutuels [Horse Racing] A form of wagering that originated in France in which all money bet is divided up among those who have winning tickets, after taxes, takeout and other deductions are made.
  • Parimutuel [Horse Racing] A form of wagering that originated in France in which all money bet is divided up among those who have winning tickets, after taxes, takeout and other deductions are made.
  • Parimutuel(s) [Horse Racing] A form of wagering originated in 1865 by Frenchman Pierre Oller in which all money bet is divided up among those who have winning tickets, after taxes, takeout and other deductions are made. Oller called his system "parier mutuel" meaning "mutual stake" or "betting among ourselves." As this wagering method was adopted in England it became known as "Paris mutuals," and soon after "parimutuels."
  • Parked Out [Horse Racing] A horse racing on the outside, with at least one horse between it and the inside rail or barrier.
  • Parking Lot [Motor Sports] After a big crash which takes out a lot of cars, the track looks like a parking lot.
  • Parkland [Golf] A course laid out in grassland with little rough.
  • Parlay [Blackjack] 1. This is a reference to increasing the size of one's bet by the amount won on a previous bet. 2. It refers to increasing one's overall bankroll in a session or number of sessions, such as, "He parlayed his $1000 bankroll to $4000 after two months of play."
  • Parlay Cards [General] Wagers on a minimum of 3 and up to 15 propositions; the more you pick, the higher the payoff.
  • Parley [Craps] Leaving your winnings in action.
  • Parroh [Martial Arts] "Return." A Korean command used in formal class to return to a ready stance.
  • Parrot Beak [Sailing] A clip at the end of a spinnaker pole to hold the guy.
  • Parrot Mouth [Horse Racing] A horse with an extreme overbite.
  • Parry [Fencing] A block of the attack, made with the forte of one's own blade; also parade.
  • Part [Horse Racing] Used by the International Cataloguing Standards Committee to separate races from different countries for sales cataloguing purposes. Races of Part I countries (Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, New Zealand, Peru, South Africa, the United States, the Hong Kong International Cup and the Japan Cup) are accepted for black-type and graded purposes; races of Part II countries (Belgium, Hong Kong [except Hong Kong International Cup, see above], India, Japan [except Japan Cup, see above], Malaysia, Mexico, Panama, Puerto Rico, Scandinavia, Singapore, Spain, Uruguay and Venezuela) are accepted for black-type purposes only, with no grade or group designators; races of Part III countries (all others) are not accepted for cataloguing purposes.
  • Part of the Building/House [Bowling] Said of the 7 or 10 pin when it remains solidly standing after an apparently perfect hit. Used in a phrase such as, "That pin must be part of the building."
  • Part Wheel [Horse Racing] Using a key horse or horses in different, but not all possible, exotic wagering combinations. See wheel.
  • Parti [Bingo] Short for participation bingo, a type of slot bingo or cash bingo where the prize is cash (and depends on the number of players, since it is at least 50% of the money paid in). The most common boards used for parti bingo are inlaid cards and hand-held shutter boards.

Q

  • Q [Poker] Abbreviation for a queen, usually found only in written text about cards.
  • Qasab [Archery] See Majră.
  • Qaws Al-Husbăn, Qaws Murakkabah Ŕlă L-Majră [Archery] Arabic for dart bow. See Majră.
  • Qi-Gong (Chinese) [Martial Arts] Method for "the exercise of the energy".
  • Qinna (Chinese) [Martial Arts] The art to seize and to grasp. Qinna groups together all seizures and techniques of dislocation. Qinna contains techniques of attacks on the articulations, on the throat, on the muscles, on the tendons and also techniques of pressure on vital points of the human body. The techniques of Qinna are used in several Martial Arts among others the Bagua Zhang and other Chinese Martial Arts.
  • Qma [Motor Sports] Quarter Midgets of America, the original national sanctioning body for quarter midgets. QMA has produced many of today's modern stars, such as Jeff Gordon, Jimmy Vasser, Kenny Irwin, and most of the top USAC contenders.
  • Qogr [Keno] Queensland Office of Gaming Regulation.
  • Qs [Baseball] Quality Starts
  • Quackers [Poker] Deuces. (Deuces are sometimes called ducks, as in Dewey Duck.)
  • Quad [Lotto] A four-digit number consisting of only one digit. Examples: 1111, 2222, 7777. There are only 10 in the game and one of these numbers should appear every 2.7 years
  • Quadrant [Sailing] A device connected to the rudder that the steering cables attach to.
  • Quadrella [Horse Racing] You have to correctly select the winner of four specific races nominated by your TAB. The selected races vary from state to state.
  • Quadricycle [Motor Sports] An early type of light, four-wheeled automobile using bicycle wheels and a frame of steel tubes.
  • Quadruple [Rowing] A sculling boat for four rowers. Often shortened to "quad."
  • Quadruple Double [Basketball] To record double digit figures in four different categories. See also triple double.
  • Quadruple Peel [Croquet] A four-wicket peel.
  • Quadruple-Double [Basketball] An extremely rare (it's only happened four times in NBA history) achievement in which a player accumulates doubles figures in four of the following categories in the same game: points, rebounds, assists, steals and blocked shots.
  • Quadruplets [Poker] Four of a kind.
  • Quads [Video Poker] Four of a kind like 4-4-4-4-5.
  • Quail High [Golf] Descriptive of a long shot hit on a low, flat trajectory, like the flight of a quail.
  • Qualifier [Poker] A minimum standard that a hand must meet in order to win. Usually applied to the lowball side of a high-low split pot.
  • Qualifiers [Poker] 1) Openers (Minimum opening requirements in a particular game. In California draw (limit), for example, a pair of jacks is openers. "Who's got openers?" means "Can anyone open the pot?", that is, does anyone have a pair of jacks or better?). 2) In a high-low split game, particular holding (or better) that a player must have to win the low half or high half of a pot, as, for example, 8-or-better.
  • Qualifiers or Quallies [Motor Sports] Softer compound tires designed for qualifying only because they provide excellent traction but only for a very short amount of time.
  • Qualify [Motor Sports] During designated sessions, teams must meet established lap times to qualify for (or enter) a race based on a predetermined number of spots available.
  • Qualifying [Motor Sports] The competition among drivers to determine the starting line up or starting grid of a race. The driver with the fastest lap earns the pole position, the second highest lap speed gets the outside pole position, other starting positions are filled accordingly. Since there is a limited number of starting spots available a driver may fail to qualify for the race.
  • Qualifying Competition [Tennis] Tournament giving low-ranked players the opportunity to qualify for the tournament proper.
  • Qualifying Draw [Soccer] The division of teams into groups for World Cup qualifying matches, held 2 years before The Draw.
  • Qualifying Matches [Soccer] Games played in the 2 years preceding the World Cup to determine which teams participate in the tournament.
  • Qualifying School [Golf] Where would-be professionals attempt to qualify for the PGA and LPGA tours.
  • Qualifying Shot [Croquet] The shot that begins a turn.
  • Quality Start [Baseball] Any start in which a pitcher works six or more innings while allowing three or fewer earned runs.
  • Quan-Fa [Martial Arts] (Chinese) The rules of the Martial Arts. Name of the Chinese Martial Art, also called Ch'uan-Fa, Gong-Fu, Kung-Fu or Kempô in Japanese.
  • Quando [Martial Arts] See "bisento."
  • Quantum Mechanics [Croquet] The laws of Quantum Mechanics do not necessarily apply to croquet but make a fascinating study. A most excellent reference is The Dancing Wu Li Masters, by Gary Zukov, William Morrow and Co. 1979.
  • Quarantine [Horse Racing] 1) A process used to isolate foreign horses for a short period of time to ensure they are not carrying any diseases. May be at a racetrack, airport or specially designated facility. Horses must be cleared by a federal veterinarian before being released from quarantine. 2) Any facility used to keep infected horses away from the general equine population.
  • Quarantine Flag [Sailing] The quebec pennant is flown when first entering a country, indicating that the people on the ship are healthy and that the vessel wants permission to visit the country.
  • Quarrel [Archery] A crossbow arrow.
  • Quart [Poker] Four cards in sequence of the same suit, that is, four to a straight flush.
  • Quarte [Fencing] The fourth guard or parry; blocking the opponent's blade by moving it high and to the inside so it points beyond the chest or stomach.
  • Quarter [Poker] 1) Twenty-five dollars, often symbolized by a green casino chip. 2) To divide half a pot between two tying hands. In split pot games, a player who "ties" another player for their half of the pot is said to be "quartered".
  • Quarter Bet [Roulette] One wager that bets four numbers at the same time. Also known as a Corner Bet or a Square Bet. Pays off at 8-1.
  • Quarter Check [Poker] Twenty-five dollars, often symbolized by a green casino chip.
  • Quarter Chip [Poker] Twenty-five dollars, often symbolized by a green casino chip.
  • Quarter Crack [Horse Racing] This is a crack found in the wall of the hoof in the area of the quarter. It usually runs from the bottom of the wall up to the coronet.
  • Quarter Game [Poker] 1) A small home poker game, in which the stakes generally are nickels, dimes, and quarters. Also, nickel-dime-quarter game. 2) Any small-stakes game.
  • Quarter Horse [Horse Racing] Breed of horse especially fast for a quarter of a mile, from which its name is derived.
  • Quarter Midget [Motor Sports] A scaled down version of a full midget, with about an 80-inch wheelbase, the size of a go-kart. Unlike go-karts, they have full suspensions. Most classes run on standard gasoline, but the top class AA engines burn alcohol. Quarter midgets have two sanctioning bodies, Quarter Midgets of America and Junior Sprint Cars of America. QMA restricts drivers from 5 to 16 years of age, while JSCA allows drivers to race until they're 19 years old.
  • Quarter Panel [Motor Sports] The sheet metal on both sides of the car from the C-post to the rear bumper below the deck lid and above the wheel well.
  • Quarter Pole [Horse Racing] Colored post at infield rail exactly two furlongs from the finish line.
  • Quarter Shot [Golf] A shot made with a reduced swing, less than that for a half shot.
  • Quarter White Stocking (Leg Markings) [Horse Racing] The white marking extends up to and includes the lower one-quarter of the cannon.
  • Quarterback [Football] The leader of a team’s offense, he takes the snap from the center and either hands the ball to a running back to run with, passes it to a receiver or runs with it himself; he also communicates each play to his teammates.
  • Quartered [Poker] Winning one-fourth of a pot, usually due to splitting the low half of the pot in a high-low split game.
  • Quartering Sea [Sailing] A sea which comes over the quarter of the boat.
  • Quarters [Craps] A term used by experienced players meaning chips with a twenty-five dollar denomination.
  • Quatre [Roulette] Corner, 4 number bet.
  • Quay [Sailing] Also a wharf. A section parallel to the shore for docking and unloading vessels.
  • Queen [Poker] A face card, the one that ranks between the jack and the king.
  • Queen B [Bingo] 73
  • Queen High [Poker] 1) In high poker, a no pair hand whose highest card is a queen. "I have a queen high; can you beat that?" "Yeah, I got king high." 2) In low poker, a hand topped by a queen.
  • Queen-High [Poker] Pertaining to a straight or flush topped by a queen. "I was drawing to a queen-high flush but all I made was queen high."
  • Queens Full [Poker] A full house consisting of three queens and another pair.
  • Queens Over [Poker] 1) A full house consisting of three queens and another pair.2) Two pair, the higher of which are queens.
  • Queens Up [Poker] Two pair, the higher of which are queens.
  • Queer [Poker] Any of several cheating devices, such as a holdout machine.
  • Questionable Stroke [Croquet] A play of dubious legality, or in which there is a chance of a foul. Referee should be consulted.
  • Quick [Baseball] Fast (noun) pertaining to running or pitching; a distinctive Australian baseball expression out of the 60s.
  • Quick Change Rear End [Motor Sports] A type of rear end which is designed so that the gear set can quickly be changed with another set having a different drive ratio, without removing the rear end from the car.
  • Quick Command [Golf] Leads field from the early stages of race.
  • Quick Eight [Bowling] An apparently good pocket hit that knocks down only eight pins, usually leaving the 4-7 or 6-10.
  • Quick Flashing Light [Sailing] A navigational aid with a light that flashes about once per second.
  • Quick Hooks and Slow Hooks [Baseball] A Quick Hook is the removal of a pitcher who has pitched less than 6 innings and given up 3 runs or less. A Slow Hook occurs when a pitcher pitches more than 9 innings, or allows 7 or more runs, or whose combined innings pitched and runs allowed totals 13 or more.
  • Quick Pick [Lotto] A method of playing a lottery game where a computer, usually built into the lottery agent's terminal, randomly picks numbers for the player.
  • Quinella [Horse Racing] Wager in which first two finishers must be picked, but payoff is made no matter which of the two wins and which runs second.
  • Quinella Double [Greyhound Racing] A wagering term describing the two greyhounds finishing first and second in any order in two designated races.
  • Quinella Pool [Horse Racing] The total amount bet in a race designated as a quinella.
  • Quiniela [Golf] A wagering term describing the two greyhounds finishing first and second in either order.
  • Quiniela (Quinella) [Greyhound Racing] A wagering term describing the two greyhounds finishing first and second in either order. (UK, Reverse Forecast).
  • Quinine [Poker] 1) In lowball, a 9. 2) In hold 'em, Q-9 as one's first two cards.
  • Quint [Poker] Straight flush.
  • Quint Major [Poker] Royal flush.
  • Quinte [Fencing] The fifth guard or parry. In foil or epee, a low line on the side away from the sword arm, with a pronated wrist. In sabre, a high guard that protects the head.
  • Quintuple Peel [Croquet] A five wicket peel, rarely seen.
  • Quit [Poker] Cash in your chips and leave a game.
  • Quit Race [Keno] Cashing in a multi game ticket before all games have been played.
  • Quitting on the Ball [Golf] Not hitting through your shot with complete effort.
  • Quitting Time [Poker] In a home game, the prearranged time at which the game is supposed to end. (This is often violated when the losers insist on playing "just one more round" or "just another hour" in a usually-vain attempt to recoup their losses, and the winners sometimes accommodate them, knowing the losers will likely lose even more
  • Quiver [Archery] A case for holding arrows.
  • Quiver, Querquer [Archery] A bag or case to carry arrows.
  • Quorum [Poker] The minimum number of players, usually six, required to start a poker game.

R

  • R [Baseball] Runs Allowed
  • R & a [Golf] Abbreviation for the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, Scotland, which established the international rules of golf in collaboration with the U. S. Golf Association.
  • R-12 [Motor Sports] The chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant, commonly referred to as Freon (a DuPont trademark) or CFC-12, now considered environmentally hazardous but once the key ingredient in automotive air-conditioning systems. A refrigerant is a chemical compound that absorbs, carries and releases heat in an air-conditioning system.
  • R-134a [Motor Sports] The environmentally safe refrigerant now used in air-conditioning systems. It requires a slightly bulkier condenser unit than R-12. Vehicles equipped with R-12 systems can be converted to use R-134a. Since Freon is now banned, expensive and hard to obtain, the conversion may be a good idea when an R-12-based system needs recharging, particularly if technicians detect a leak.
  • R-Button [Bingo] A button on the foot rail with a single letter R on it. In order to score your wins, you need to push the R-button. On games where you could rearrange winning combinations via things like the magic screen, you need to push the R-button for every winning combination you set. The main reason for the R-button was to have more control over when scoring happened, and it had the nice side effect of reducing wear in the game, as the search disc was held stationary until the R-button was pushed. On earlier games where the search disc was rotating constantly, the contacts on the search disc and the search relays would wear away.
  • R.B.D. [Horse Racing] Random Barrier Draw: Indicates a random or non-preferential barrier draw.
  • R.O.D.M.-R.O.D.S. [Horse Racing] This indicates that the horse in question is excluded right outside the barrier draw in Mobile or Standing Start Events (wherever applicable).
  • R.O.E [Poker] A game or tournament format in which three forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are razz, Omaha/8, and seven-card stud high-low.
  • Ra [Motor Sports] Road America, Elkhart Lake WI. 4 mile road racing course.
  • Rabbit [Poker] 1) A weak player. 2) Short for after the rabbit or follow the rabbit. A form of draw, usually lowball, in which a player gets a bonus from the other players for winning two pots in a row. For example, in a $4-to-go no-limit lowball game, each player puts up $20, which goes into a kitty. Whoever wins the two pots in a row gets the kitty. This tends to stimulate action, because when a player wins a pot, she is likely to loosen her requirements for the next pot to try to get the kitty. She may kill the next pot to try to increase her chances of winning the next pot and to keep out the two-card draws.
  • Rabbit Punch [Boxing] An illegal punch to the back of the boxerąs head or body (usually kidneys in that case), usually delivered when the boxers are fighting "inside."
  • Rabbithunt [Poker] After the deal is over, search through the un-dealt cards to see what you would have made if you had stayed in the pot. Not permitted in most establishments, and frowned on in the rest.
  • Rabbithunting [Poker] After the deal is over, search through the un-dealt cards to see what you would have made if you had stayed in the pot. Not permitted in most establishments, and frowned on in the rest.
  • Race [Poker] In tournaments it is sometimes convenient to remove all lower- denomination chips from play, as the remaining players' stacks tend to grow. Small chips are converted to larger chips and any odd chips are "raced off" in the following way: each player with odd chips places them in front of his stack and is dealt one card for each chip. Highest card (rank and suit) takes all the small chips and converts them to higher-denomination chips
  • Race Call [Horse Racing] The description of a race while it is in process, which includes such things as the positions of the runners at different stages, any moves made by drivers, and any incidents that occur. A race is called or described by a race caller.
  • Race Caller [Greyhound Racing] The person who describes the race at a racecourse.
  • Race for the Odd Chips [Poker] In tournaments it is sometimes convenient to remove all lower- denomination chips from play, as the remaining players' stacks tend to grow. Small chips are converted to larger chips and any odd chips are "raced off" in the following way: each player with odd chips places them in front of his stack and is dealt one card for each chip. Highest card (rank and suit) takes all the small chips and converts them to higher-denomination chips
  • Race Pace [Rowing] A stroke rating that a crew can hold for an entire race.
  • Race Rubber [Motor Sports] Race tires as opposed to qualifying tires.
  • Racecar [Motor Sports] One of our favorite palindromes; backwards and forwards, it always spells "racecar."
  • Raced Off [Poker] Dumped out of a tournament due to having lost one's remaining small denomination chips during a race.
  • Raced Out [Poker] Dumped out of a tournament due to having lost one's remaining small denomination chips during a race.
  • Raced Outside [Horse Racing] See the death.
  • Raced Recklessly [Golf] Seriously impeded one or more dogs, nearly interfering.
  • Racehorse [Poker] Blind Stud. A home game, also called Mike or racehorse, played as five-, six-, or seven-card stud, with the exception that all cards are dealt face down. For example, in the seven-card stud variant, each player receives three cards face down, followed by a round of betting, another card face down, another round of betting, a fifth card face down, another round of betting, a sixth card face down, another round of betting, and a final card face down, with a final round of betting. The game generates a lot of action, but is more of a gamble--and thus presents less opportunity to the skillful, analytical player--than the "normal" stud versions with their several rounds of face-up cards.
  • Racehorse Keno [Keno] The term for the game of keno prior to 1951, when each number also had the name of a racehorse to it.
  • Racer's Tape [Motor Sports] Heavy duty duct tape used to temporarily repair hanging body parts which might hinder aerodynamic features and decrease performance. Most commonly used on stock cars (e.g. NASCAR Winston Cup) which use more paneling than Indy-style cars and are accustomed to more contact.
  • Rachel [Poker] The queen of diamonds. Probably comes from the Bible
  • Racing Association [Horse Racing] A company that holds a license from the state racing commission to operate a pari-mutuel racetrack.
  • Racing Commission [Horse Racing] An appointed body of men and women which governs and polices racing where legislation has been passed to permit use of the pari-mutuels system in connection with horse racing.
  • Racing Conditions [Horse Racing] The physical conditions involved in a race.
  • Racing Dates [Horse Racing] Specific dates allotted to horse and dog tracks to conduct business by racing commissions charged with granting licenses and monitoring the conduct of these tracks in conformation with the official rules of racing in their states.
  • Racing Gas [Motor Sports] Gasoline designed specifically for racing engines. Racing gas usually has very high octane.
  • Racing Judge [Horse Racing] A greyhound racing official who presides over a race meeting, has jurisdiction over all racing officials, rules on protests, and imposes fines and suspensions. In Texas, all three racing judges presiding at a race meeting are Commission employees.
  • Racing Plate [Horse Racing] A very light horseshoe with a toe grab or cleat for better traction.
  • Racing Secretary [Horse Racing] The racing official who writes the conditions for the races, assigns the weights for handicap races, receives entries, conducts the draw, and is responsible for the operation and organization of the race office.
  • Racing Sound [Horse Racing] A horse able to race and pass all veterinarian test, but not 100%.
  • Racing Start [Rowing] The opening strokes of a race, which are typically rowed at a high cadence to get the shell moving rapidly through the water.
  • Rack [Poker] 1) A plastic tray which holds 100 chips in 5 stacks of 20. 2) 100 chips. "I'm stuck three racks." 3) Place chips in a rack. 4) Win; usually followed by up. "He's been racking up the game" means he's been winning a lot. Comes from meaning 3.
  • Rack and Pinion Steering [Motor Sports] The steering wheel is connected to a pinion gear that meshes with a toothed bar, also called a rack or linear gear. As the pinion turns, the rack moves side to side, moving the steering linkage and causing the front wheels to turn left or right. The ends of the rack are linked to the steering wheel with tie rods.
  • Rack-and-Pinion Steering [Motor Sports] A steering system having a pinion gear at the lower end of the steering column that engages a rack or a toothed rod that connects to the wheel steering arms.
  • Racket [Badminton] The racket, or bat, has a nearly round face, about 7 inches across, and a long, thin handle. Overall length is about 27 inches and its weight is about 8 ounces.
  • Racmsa [Motor Sports] The RAC Motor Sports Association is recognized by the FIA as the governing body of motor sport in Great Britain.
  • Radar [Sailing] Radio detection and ranging. An electronic instrument that uses radio waves to find the distance and location of other objects. Used to avoid collisions, particularly in times of poor visibility.
  • Radar Arch [Sailing] An arch to mount the radar, usually at the stern of the boat.
  • Radar Reflector [Sailing] An object designed to increase the radio reflectivity of a boat so that it is more visible on radar. Many small boats are made with fiberglass and other materials that do not reflect radar very well on their own.
  • Radial Paralysis [Horse Racing] This condition causes the horse to have a partially paralyzed foreleg and is due to an injured radial nerve. When this occurs, the horse has great difficulty bringing the affected leg forward.
  • Radial Ply [Motor Sports] A tire in which the fabric cords run radially in a line from the wheel hub or straight out from the bead or around the tubular shape of the tire. Annular belts of fabric or steel mesh add rigidity. Advantages of this design are: more flexible side walls with a relatively stiff tread area and a larger and more consistent footprint on the road under all driving conditions.
  • Radiator [Motor Sports] The copper or aluminum device in front of the engine through which hot engine coolant is circulated and cooled. The liquid is then recirculated back through the engine block to cool it.
  • Radio [Sailing] An instrument that uses radio waves to communicate with other vessels. VHF (very high frequency) radios are common for marine use, but are limited in range. Single side band (SSB) radios have longer ranges.
  • Radio Beacon [Sailing] A navigational aid that emits radio waves for navigational purposes. The radio beacon's position is known and the direction of the radiobeacon can be determined by using a radio direction finder.
  • Radio Bearing [Sailing] A bearing taken with a radio direction finder toward a radio beacon.
  • Radio Direction Finder [Sailing] RDF for short. An instrument that can determine the direction that a radio transmission is coming from. The RDF is used with a radio beacon to find a radio bearing to help determine the vessel's position.
  • Radiograph [Horse Racing] The picture or image on film generated by x-rays.
  • Radiowaves [Sailing] Invisible waves in the electromagnetic spectrum that are used to communicate (radio) and navigate (radar, RDF.)
  • Raft [Sailing] (1) A small flat boat, usually inflatable. (2) To moor with more than one boat tied together, usually using only one boat's ground tackle.
  • Rag [Poker] A card, usually a low card, that, when it appears, has no apparent impact on the hand. A flop of 7 4 2 is a rag flop - few playable hands match the flop well. If the table shows QJT9, all of spades, a 2h on the river is a rag.
  • Rag Off [Poker] To get a card on the river that doesn't help you.
  • Rag the Puck [Ice Hockey] To retain control of the puck, without attempting to score, for a considerable period of time, usually through clever stickhandling; a tactic used to kill time while a team is short-handed or when it holds a lead with not much time left in the game.
  • Rag Top [Motor Sports] A convertible with a soft top.
  • Ragged [Poker] A flop (or board) that doesn't appear to help anybody very much. A flop that came down Jd-6h-2c would look ragged.
  • Ragged Flop [Poker] Flop cards that are of no use to any player's hand.
  • Ragging [Ice Hockey] Retaining the puck by clever stickhandling; often used by a shorthanded team to kill time.
  • Rags [Poker] Worthless cards; blanks.
  • Rah-Rahs [Baseball] A traditional Australian baseball gesture made at the end of many junior and senior club games, led by the coach or captain in a team huddle, often going like this:
  • Rail [Horse Racing] A barrier that forms the inside and outside perimeter of the racing surface. Also, at a greyhound racetrack, the metal strip that runs alongside the inside of the track on which the lure operates.
  • Rail Runner [Horse Racing] A race animal that prefers to run next to the inside rail.
  • Railbird [Poker] Someone watching a game from the rail, often used to describe a broke ex-player.
  • Railroad [Bowling] A wide split on which both pins are on the same line; e.g., the 7-10, 8-10, 7-9, or 4-6.
  • Railroad Hand [Poker] 1) The two pair hand jacks and 6s. (Say it rhythmically with this emphasis: jacks and sixes, jacks and sixes, jacks and sixes. Sounds a bit like a train, doesn't it?) 2) In hold 'em, J-6 as one's first two cards.
  • Rails [Golf] Found on the soles of metal woods, rails function to lower the center of gravity of the club and to provide less resistance as the club travels through the turf.
  • Rails Run [Horse Racing] A horse can be stuck on the fence behind the leader, with other runners behind and next to it, and unable to get a clear run to the finish line. However, sometimes the leader will move out wider on the track when under pressure in the run home, enabling the horse to scoot through along the rail to the finish line
  • Rain Out [General] A contest that has been canceled because of bad weather.
  • Rain Tires [Motor Sports] Softer compound with better tread for wet-weather conditions. In dry conditions, these softer tires wear faster than harder compound tires with less tread.
  • Rainbow [Video Poker] A flop that contains three different suits, thus no flush can be made on the turn. Can also mean a complete five card board that has no more than two of any suit, thus no flush is possible.
  • Rainbow Bet [Blackjack] A bet, usually large, comprised of chips of various denominations, randomly arranged in a single pile, mostly in order to camouflage a bet increase.
  • Rainbow Blackjack [Blackjack] Variation of blackjack which identifies each player's position at the table with a color. Each player has betting spots for each of the other colors, allowing him to bet on other players' hands as well as his own. This game is not widely offered, seen mainly in southern Mississippi.
  • Rainbow Hand [Poker] A hand containing cards from each of the four suits.
  • Rainbow Jersey [Cycling] A multi-colored striped jersey that is worn by the defending world champion.
  • Rainbow Pack [Bingo] A paper pack that allows players to play for three or four different prize denominations at once.
  • Rainbow Warriors [Motor Sports] The crew of Winston Cup driver No. 24, Jeff Gordon, from the rainbow-striped car and uniforms.
  • Rained Out [General] A game canceled because of weather.
  • Raise [Poker] Placing a higher wager into the pot. All other players must call that bet--or raise it--in order to remain in the game.
  • Raise Back [Poker] Re-raise.
  • Raise Blind [Poker] Raise without having seen your cards.
  • Raise Out [Poker] Drive someone out of a pot by betting more than he is willing to call. In a no-limit lowball game you might hear, "I had a bicycle with the joker to draw to, but he raised me out when he put his whole stack in."
  • Raised Ball [Field Hockey] Lifting the ball more than 18 inches above the ground with a hit is an offense, known as a raised ball, if it is dangerous or likely to lead to dangerous play.
  • Raised Bar [Horse Racing] Bar plate which helps prevent running down.
  • Raised Pot [Poker] A pot in which there has been a raise.
  • Raiser [Poker] One who raises.
  • Raisin Bread. [Poker] I'm raising.
  • Rake [Poker] Money taken from each pot and given to the house in return for hosting the game. Usually a percentage of the pot (5%-10%) up to some maximum amount.
  • Rake Game [Poker] A game in which the house makes its money by raking, as opposed to taking time. Sometimes called snatch game
  • Rake Iron [Golf] General term given to wooden shafted clubs whose heads have slots cut through them. The concept was to reduce drag when hitting the ball. So named due to their resemblance to a garden rake.
  • Rakeoff Game [Poker] A game in which the house makes its money by raking, as opposed to taking time. Sometimes called snatch game
  • Rakes [Poker] Cards trimmed or shaved slightly so that they can be detected by feel.
  • Rally [Motor Sports] Competing teams, consisting of a driver and a navigator, are given route instructions, which they must follow exactly. Each team follows the course independently, trying to rack up points based on how well they meet a pre-determined schedule.
  • Ram and Jam [Poker] Bet and raise frequently and aggressively.
  • Ram Rod [Golf] Long (@48”) thin (@3/8”) rod used to force a cork down a steel shaft when using lead powder as a swingweight material.
  • Ram Wing [Powerboating] The center hull section of a three-point hydroplane, which is shaped like an airfoil to generate lift.
  • Rama Isihn [Archery] Arrows of Wetter Island.
  • Rama Ma [Archery] A bow, Wetter Island.
  • Rammer-Jammer [Poker] Fast-action player, one who bets and raises frequently and aggressively.
  • Ramming and Jamming [Poker] Betting and raising frequently and aggressively; describing a lively game. "You oughta get in the 3-6; they're rammin' and jammin'."
  • Ramp [Skydiving] Some aircraft have ramps which open at the back of the plane, allowing a large amount of skydivers to exit at once in formation.
  • Ranch [Poker] All one's chips; usually preceded by bet the. When a player goes all in, someone may say, "He's betting the ranch." Also, the farm.
  • Random [Video Poker] It is required by law that a Video Poker Machine must draw cards at random from a single deck. This means that no card is more likely to be drawn than any other. There is no rational reason for a Casino to try to cheat on this, since they can legally provide a Payoff Table that is lousy for the player.
  • Random Number Generator [Video Poker] A computer program or algorithm used to generate a series of random numbers.
  • Randori [Martial Arts] Free practise, sparring
  • Randy [Freestyle Skating] A single flip with two and a half twists.
  • Rangdoodles [Poker] 1) In private or home games, a hand or round in which the stakes are temporarily increased, usually after a "big" hand is shown down. For example, in a $5-limit game, if aces full or better appears in a showdown, the next hand or the entire next round might be played at $10-limit. Also rangdoodles, wangdoodles. 2. Less commonly, progressive progressive.
  • Range [Sailing] (1) distance a boat can travel with its available fuel and supplies. (2) The difference between high and low tides. (3) Two lights or daymarks that can be aligned with one behind another to indicate that one is positioned on a line on a chart, typically used to guide a boat into a channel.
  • Range Factor [Baseball] The number of Chances (Putouts plus Assists) times nine divided by the number of Defensive Innings Played. The average for a Regular Player at each position in 1997: Second Base: 5.00 Third Base: 2.67 Shortstop: 4.56 Left Field: 1.99 Center Field: 2.55 Right Field: 2.06
  • Range Finders [Bowling] Markers in the lane that help the bowler determine the target line. There are two sets of such markers: ten dots located seven feet past the foul line and seven arrows arranged in a triangle beginning 16 feet beyond the foul line.
  • Rank [Horse Racing] A horse that refuses to settle under a jockey's handling in a race, running in a headstrong manner without respect to pace.
  • Rank Card [Poker] Card with numbers, that is, 2 through 10.
  • Rank of Cards [Poker] The hierarchy of cards, from high to low, or low to high, to determine what beats what, as (from high to low) A (ace), K (king), Q (queen), J (jack), T (10), 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, trey (3), deuce (2). In ace-to-five lowball (and many high-low split games), the list goes, from low to high, A, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, J, Q, K.
  • Rank of Hands [Poker] The hierarchy of cards, from high to low, or low to high, to determine what beats what, as (from high to low) A (ace), K (king), Q (queen), J (jack), T (10), 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, trey (3), deuce (2). In ace-to-five lowball (and many high-low split games), the list goes, from low to high, A, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, J, Q, K.
  • Rankling Arrow [Archery] An arrow with a detachable head which remains in the wound when the arrow is removed.
  • Rap [Poker] 1) In draw poker, at the time to draw cards, indicate that one is pat. So called because a player, if he has a pat hand, often raps on the table with his knuckles when it is his turn to announce his draw. 2) In any form of poker, at the time for making a bet, indicate that one declines to bet; check. 3) In a game in which gypsy bets are permitted, when it is the blind's turn to act, decline to raise, indicated by rapping on the table with one's cards or knuckles. 4) In a game in which a player must post a blind to get a hand earlier than waiting for the blind to come around (which blind then acts as the player's opening bet), when it is that player's legal turn to act, decline to raise, indicated in similar fashion. 5) When one is offered the deck by the dealer, after shuffling, to cut, rap on the deck to indicate one is declining the option of cutting the cards. For definitions 1 and 2, also knuckle or knock. For 5, sometimes, tap. 6) Standing pat. "He gave it the rap" means he stood pat.
  • Rap Pat [Poker] 1) Stand pat, that is, at the point when one is supposed to draw, tap the table with one's cards or rap on the table with one's knuckles as an indication that one will not draw any cards. 2) Extended figuratively, draw no cards (but without necessarily actually performing the act of tapping the table with one's cards or rapping with one's knuckles). "How many cards did John take, dealer?" "He rapped pat."
  • Rapids [Canoeing] An area of a river, stream, or course where the current is very rapid and flows around and over various obstacles.
  • Rapier [Fencing] A long, double-edged thrusting sword popular in the 16th-17th centuries.
  • Raquel Welch [Poker] In hold 'em, 3-8 as one's first two cards. Has something to do with certain measurements
  • Rassemblement [Fencing] Bringing the feet together at right angles with the heels touching and the body upright.
  • Rat [Baseball] Ratio of AB/HR
  • Rat Holing (Chips). [Blackjack] When the player secretly sneaks a portion of his chips into purse or pocket in order to hide from the pit crew how much he's winning.
  • Ratchet Rear End [Motor Sports] A rear end gear that locks under acceleration, and unlocks when the driver lets off the throttle. Commonly used in oval-track racing, where it provides the straight-line acceleration of a locked rear end, without the cornering difficulties.
  • Rate [Horse Racing] To restrain a horse early in a race, conserving its energies for later challenges.
  • Rate Card [Keno] Provided by the casino. Shows payoffs for various bets.
  • Rated [Horse Racing] Relating to the mile rate that a horse records over any race distance. Say a horse records a mile rate of 2:00.1 in a 2113 metre race, it is said to have rated 2:00.1 over 2113 metres.
  • Rated Payback [Video Poker] The long term expected return of a game. Many analyzts quote the value given by a game analysis program, but that assumes perfect play. For example, they rate Double Bonus Poker at 100.17%, or even round that up to 100.2%.
  • Rathole [Poker] During a playing session, surreptitiously remove chips from play. This is not strictly cheating, just not fair to the other players who do not have an opportunity to win as much as they might otherwise. It is not permitted in public card rooms to remove chips from the table without cashing out. Players rat hole chips because they don't want to chance losing them back, or because they want to hide their winnings from someone who has staked them or someone they owe money to.
  • Ratholer [Poker] One who ratholes chips.

S

  • S [Poker] Shorthand, particularly in E-mail and Internet postings, for suited. For example, specifying a hold 'em hand as KQS means king-queen suited.
  • S17 [Blackjack] An abbreviation for the casino rule which requires the dealer to stand on all soft 17s.
  • S & M [Poker] Sklansky & Malmuth. Generally refers to the ideas and algorithms published by these two authors. When used in a 7-card stud context, often refers to '7 Card Stud For Advanced Players', and when used in a Hold'em context, often refers to 'Texas Hold 'em For Advanced Players'.
  • S / I Cards [Bingo] Score/Instruction cards. The score cards defined the payouts for 3,4, and 5-in-line/section, and the instruction cards gave minimal info on what the features did. Many games also have a third/fourth card which explained unique features of the game, or indicated the OK game/red letter game guaranteed minimums.
  • S&R [Motor Sports] Safety and Rescue. Race staff operating ambulances, crash trucks, wreckers and flat tow vehicles.
  • S-Curve [Luge] Two connected curves that alternate directions.
  • S.a.E. [Motor Sports] Society of Automotive Engineers. A group known for publishing research papers and defining various standards of measurement.
  • Sa [Skiing] Ski Australia, which was once known as the Australian Ski Federation.
  • Sabaki [Martial Arts] Dodging
  • Sabom [Martial Arts] Teacher" or "instructor.
  • Sabot [Baccarat] The French term for the shoe.
  • Sabre [Fencing] A fencing weapon with a flat blade and knuckle guard, used with cutting or thrusting actions; a military sword popular in the 18th to 20th centuries; any cutting sword used by cavalry.
  • Sac [Baseball] Sacrifice Bunts
  • Sack [Football] A tackle of the quarterback behind his line of scrimmage.
  • Sacrifice [Baseball] A statistic that is recorded if a player intentionally (or sometimes unintentionally) hits the ball for the sole purpose of moving a base runner to the next base, fully expecting be out.
  • Sacrifice Bunt [Baseball] A bunt intended to advance runners at the expense of the batter being put out. The hitless plate appearance is not counted towards a player's batting average.
  • Sacrifice Fly [Baseball] Fly ball out that scores a runner from third base.
  • Sacrifice Fly (Sf) [Baseball] When a fly ball to the outfield advances a base runner to the next base, but results in an out for the batter.
  • Sacrifice Hit (Sh) [Baseball] When a sacrifice results in the current base runner advancing a base and an out for the batter.
  • Sadak, Saghdach [Archery] The equipment of an archer, Russia.
  • Saddle [Bingo] This is the unit which sits on top of the barrier and contains the mechanisms used in the game - typically the coin mechanisms, valid & credit displays, and claim buttons. Most pod tops have the equipment for 4-6 playing positions. Also Pod Top.
  • Saddle Cloth [Greyhound Racing] The device that displays the horse's barrier position within a race, and in some cases, the colour of the saddlecloth refers to the race number.
  • Saddle Cloth (Towel) [Horse Racing] A cloth under the saddle on which program numbers are displayed.
  • Saddle Pad [Horse Racing] A piece of felt, sheepskin, or more usually, foam rubber, used as a base for the saddle.
  • Saddlecloth [Horse Racing] The device which displays the horse's barrier position within a race, and in some cases, the colour of the saddlecloth refers to the race number.
  • Safe [Baseball] Declaration by the umpire that a runner is entitled to the bases for which he was trying.
  • Safe Driver Plan [Motor Sports] Discounts for a good driving record.
  • Safe Hit [Baseball] Noun, base hit.
  • Safe Jack [Blackjack] A high-tech version of blackjack. Card values and bet sizes are read by sensors built into the table.
  • Safe Overhead Clearance [Sailing] A distance that needs to be kept between the mast and overhead electrical lines to prevent electrical arcing.
  • Safety [Football] When a ball carrier is tackled in his own end zone after bringing the ball there under his own power; the defense earns 2 points and receives a free kick from the offenseąs own 20-yard line.
  • Safety Cup [Equestrian Sports] A cup used on the back rail of a spread fence that releases to drop the rail if struck by the horse.
  • Safety Harness [Sailing] A device worn around a person's body that can be attached to jack lines to help prevent a person from becoming separated from the boat.
  • Safety Pin [Sailing] (1) Any pin that is used to prevent a fitting from falling open. (2) A pin used to keep the anchor attached to its anchor roller when not in use.
  • Sag [Basketball] A defensive tactic in which a player drops off his man to help double-team a player in the pivot.
  • Saghdak [Archery] A Western Tibetan quiver.
  • Sai [Martial Arts] A pronged truncheon about fifteen to twenty inches long, used as a defensive instrument against various weapons such as the sword. It was developed from an Okinawan farming tool.
  • Saifa [Martial Arts] (Japanese) The name of an advanced Karate Kata of the Shorei Karate Style from Okinawa. The name translated means "Big Wave".
  • Sail [Sailing] (1) A large piece of fabric designed to be hoisted on the spars of a sailboat in such a manner as to catch the wind and propel the boat. (2) The act of using the wind to propel a sailboat.
  • Sail for [Poker] Lose. "How much did he sail for?"
  • Sail Shape [Sailing] The shape of a sail, with regard to its efficiency. In high winds a sail would probably be flatter, in low winds rounder. Other circumstances can cause a sail to twist. Controls such as the cunningham, boom vang, outhaul, traveler, halyards, leech line, sheets, and the bend of the mainmast all can affect sail shape. Also see sail trim.
  • Sail Track [Sailing] A slot into which the bolt rope or lugs in the luff of the sail are inserted to attach the sail. Most masts and roller reefing jibs use sail tracks. Systems with 2 tracks can allow for rapid sail changes.
  • Sail Trim [Sailing] The position of the sails relative to the wind and desired point of sail. Sails that are not trimmed properly may not operate efficiently. Visible signs of trim are luffing, excessive heeling, and the flow of air past telltales. Also see sail shape.
  • Sailboat [Sailing] A boat which uses the wind as its primary means of propulsion.
  • Sailboats [Poker] Two or more 4s. (That's what they look like.)
  • Sailcloth [Sailing] A fabric, usually synthetic, used to make sails.
  • Sailing Directions [Sailing] Books that describe features of particular sailing areas, such as hazards, anchorages, etc.
  • Sakotsu [Martial Arts] Clavicle, point of attack
  • Sakotsu Uchi [Martial Arts] Hit/attack on the clavicle
  • Salary Cap [Basketball] Common term for Maximum Team Salary, the maximum amount each team may pay in salaries during an NBA season, as per teams of the Collective Bargaining Agreement.
  • Salchow [Figure Skating] Invented by Ulrich Salchow, an edge jump on which skater takes off from the back inside edge of one foot and lands on the back outside edge of the other.
  • Saliva Test [Horse Racing] Laboratory test to determine if a horse has been drugged or overdosed with permitted medication.
  • Salle [Fencing] A fencing hall or club.
  • Salmon [Poker] 7 (the card, or the lowball hand).
  • Salt Away [Poker] During a playing session, surreptitiously remove chips from play. This is not strictly cheating, just not fair to the other players who do not have an opportunity to win as much as they might otherwise. It is not permitted in public card rooms to remove chips from the table without cashing out. Players rat hole chips because they don't want to chance losing them back, or because they want to hide their winnings from someone who has staked them or someone they owe money to.
  • Saltiness [Poker] Poor luck; the condition of being salty.
  • Salto [Gymnastics] An aerial flip or somersault in which the feet come up over the head and the body rotates around the waist.
  • Salty [Poker] Having poor luck; on a losing streak. "How ya doin'?" "Been running salty lately; can't seem to make a hand when it counts."
  • Salute [Fencing] With the weapon, a customary acknowledgement of one's opponent and referee at the start and end of the bout.
  • Sam [Martial Arts] The traditional uniform of kung fu.
  • Samalog [Speed Skating] A scoring system in which a skater's times for races at various distances are converted into points to determine an overall champion. Essentially, all times are converted to the equivalents for 500 meters. The number of points awarded for the 500-meter event is the same as the time in seconds; the number of points for the 1000-meter event is the time in seconds divided by two, and so on. Also sammelagt.
  • Sambo [Martial Arts] Modern Russian Grappling Art
  • Same Bet Press Method [Craps] Using the same Bet after every win. Used for place bets. When you win your first bet you say same bet to the dealer. On your next win you would tell the dealer to press it. Keep repeating the process.
  • Sample Void (Sv) [Lotto] A sample ticket, issued by the Lottery operators so players and retails can get used to a new ticket.
  • Sampson Post [Sailing] A strong post used for to attach lines for towing or mooring.
  • Samurai [Martial Arts] The swordsmen of feudal Japan who were impeccably at a wide variety of martial arts practices, particularly the sword, and served and lord and fief. Masterless samurai were known as "ronin."
  • San Jose to Gilroy [Poker] Three 10s, so called because it used to be 30 miles from San Jose to Gilroy (no longer), and 30 miles is another term for three 10s. Sometimes shortened to just Gilroy. Also, from here to Gilroy.
  • San Kung Nu [Archery] An Indo-Persian multi-bowed crossbow.
  • Sanbon [Martial Arts] In three parts, three steps
  • Sanbon Kumite [Martial Arts] Three steps sparring
  • Sanbon Zuki [Martial Arts] Three consecutive punches (the first one JODAN and the two others CHUDAN)
  • Sanchin [Martial Arts] Name of a Karate Kata
  • Sanchin Dachi [Martial Arts] Three-battle stance
  • Sanctioning Body [Motor Sports] An organization that sets and enforces the rules for a race or racing class or series. (The act of doing so is called a "sanction".)
  • Sanctioning Organization [Boxing] One of the organizations that sponsor belts for championship fights. There are three main, or so-called "legitimate" ones: The WBC (World Boxing Council), the IBF (the International Boxing Federation), and the WBA (World Boxing Association). There are a host of smaller organizations that have relatively little meaning and add to the łalphabet soup˛ boxing has become, with names like the WBO or the ICBF.
  • Sand [Poker] Use sandpaper on the sides of some cards so that their ranks can be determined by feel, or so that they can be easily located within a full deck; a method of shaving the cards.
  • Sand Bar [Sailing] An area in shallow water where wave or current action has created a small, long hill of sand. Since they are created by water movement, they can move and may not be shown on a chart.
  • Sand Crack [Horse Racing] (See QUARTER CRACK.)
  • Sand Cracks [Horse Racing] These are cracks in the toe of a dry and brittle hoof. They may run in the direction of the coronet an inch or two.
  • Sand Iron [Golf] Also called a sand wedge. A heavy, lofted club that was used for playing from bunkers. No longer in use.
  • Sand Trap [Golf] A hazard containing sand; a bunker.
  • Sand Wedge [Golf] An iron with a heavy flange on the bottom that is used primarily to get out of sand traps.
  • Sandbag [Motor Sports] To hold back on a car's performance, during trial runs and qualifying, to mislead other drivers as to its potential.
  • Sandbagger [Bowling] A bowler who deliberately keeps his average low during the first part of the season, to take advantage of an artificially high handicap later on.
  • Sandblast [Golf] Finish applied to the faces and cavities of certain irons. Metal wood heads may also have sandblasted finishes. Characterized by a light gray color, these finishes are applied through the use of an air compressor and special sandblast gun. The common media used for sandblasting is aluminum oxide sand. “Sandblast” is also the term given to the process of applying a sandblast finish.
  • Sandblasting Cabinet [Golf] Box-like cabinet with a “window” and “arm-holes” used for sandblasting. The purpose of the cabinet is to eliminate flying sand and to allow the club to be easily held and manipulated during the sandblasting process.
  • Sanding [Bobsledding] A very important step in preparing a sled for a run, which can take as much as three hours. On a four-man bobsled, each member of the crew is responsible for sanding one of the runners.
  • Sanding Belts [Golf] Long, thin belts or various grits (#120, 240, etc.) used in conjunction with 1” X 42” or 1” X 30” belt sanders.
  • Sanding Cone (Drum) [Golf] Attachment for a motor or specializes sanding station. Cone or cylindrically (drum) shaped and covered with sandpaper held in place by two-way tape; used to remove finishes from wood heads.
  • Sandpaper [Poker] Cards marked on their sides by sanding.
  • Sandwich [Poker] To raise before, and after, a caller who gets caught in the middle.
  • Sandwich Game [Bowling] Same as Dutch 200.
  • Sandwich Rubber [Table Tennis] A rubber sheet attached to the paddle with an underlying layer of sponge.
  • Sandy [Golf] Making par after being in a bunker.
  • Sangdan [Martial Arts] "Upper" or "upper level." A directional term used in Korean martial arts.
  • Sankukai [Martial Arts] A style of karate based on a combination of other systems, with an emphasis on escaping techniques and aikido-like defenses.
  • Sanshou (Chinese) [Martial Arts] Also called SANDA. During the Chinese cultural revolution the practice of combat sports in China was forbidden. It is only around 1979 that combat sports competitions appeared again. One of these new methods was SANDA, a kind of "Chinese Full Contact", a combination of blows with fists and feet but also seizures and projections.
  • Santa Barbara [Poker] In hold 'em, A-K as one's first two cards. Derives from a destructive oil spill off the Santa Barbara coast, the name arising from the more well-known name for the hand, big slick.
  • Sappo [Martial Arts] A method of attacking vital points of the body in order to cause a coma or death.
  • Sas [Motor Sports] Southern All Star Racing Series Super Late Model racing.
  • Satellite [Poker] A small-stakes tournament whose winner obtains cheap entry into a bigger tournament.
  • Satellite Navigation [Sailing] Navigation using information transmitted from satellites. See Global Positioning System.
  • Satellite Tournament [Poker] A special tournament whose prize is usually a buy-in for a larger tournament. One-table satellites usually have just one winner; sometimes second place is awarded a free entry to another tournament. In larger satellite tournaments, the winner may get entry to the larger tournament, round-trip airfare plus accommodations (if the satellite takes place in a city other than that of the larger tournament), plus some percentage of the excess cash accumulated in buy-ins and re-buys. Second, third, and sometimes other places also can win a percentage of this cash. A satellite tournament with a large number of entrants, awarding entry or entries to major tournaments, is called a super satellite.
  • Satin Finish [Golf] Type of finish applied to stainless steel iron heads and metal wood soles through a series of finishing belts. Appears as a brushed aluminum type of finish.
  • Satsu Ya [Archery] A hunting arrow, Japan.
  • Satsu Yumi [Archery] A hunting bow, Japan.
  • Saucer (Fracture) [Horse Racing] Stress fracture of the front of the cannon bone that can be straight or curved.
  • Sausage Sizzle [Baseball] The universal fund raising and social focal point in Australian amateur club sports. The baseball club sausage sizzle has a hot plate with butcher's sausages ("snags" or "bangers") and often onions cooking. The sausage is serve on white bread that is always buttered and costs $1 - $1-50. Some clubs also serve "butcher shop special" lower cuts of steak which become "steak sandwiches. Mustard is rare in Australian baseball clubs as most sausage sizzle meat is smothered in "tomato sauce" (Americans read "ketchup"). Most Australian junior baseball clubs run sausage sizzles each week or as often as possible.
  • Sauter La Coupe [Poker] A cheating maneuver in which the dealer palms a card and moves it to the bottom of the deck, there to be dealt at his discretion.
  • Savage [Horse Racing] When a horse bites another horse or a person.
  • Savannah [Poker] 7 (the card, or the lowball hand).
  • Savate [Martial Arts] French hand and foot fighting. A method of fighting to the knockout, once popular with the aristocracy of France.
  • Save [Poker] 1) Make an agreement, between two or more players, to pay the others when one wins a pot. For example, if you and I are saving antes, each time you win a pot, you throw me an ante chip, and each time I win one, I throw you a chip. 2) In a tournament, make an agreement near the end to allocate some of the prize money for first place to lower places. For example, if first place is worth $2000 and second $1000, two players might agree to save $200 and play for the rest. This way, second place would be worth $1200 and first $1800. In another example, nine players might be at the final table in a $100-buy-in tournament that pays only the top six places. They might agree before starting final-table play to save $100 for places seven through nine, the amount to come out of first place or perhaps first and second. That way, everyone who made it to the final table would be guaranteed something.
  • Save Bets [Poker] Make an agreement, between two or more players, to pay the others when one wins a pot, except that players involved in such an agreement return all of what the others have invested in the pot. For example, if you and I are saving bets, and you win a pot in which we both play, you return to me everything I put in the pot, and vice versa. In such cases, you and I make money if we are both in a pot only if someone else is in. This procedure is not permitted in most card rooms, because it looks like a form of collusion to the other players. Also push bets
  • Save Ground [Horse Racing] To cover the shortest possible distance in a race.
  • Save Opportunities (Svo) [Baseball] Number of times a relief pitcher enters a game in which one of the three situations under the definition of a save presents itself.
  • Save Percentage [Baseball] Saves (SV) divided by Save Opportunities (OP).
  • Save Situation [Baseball] A Relief Pitcher is in a Save Situation when upon entering the game with his club leading, he has the opportunity to be the finishing pitcher (and is not the winning pitcher of record at the time), and meets any one of the three following conditions: (1) he has a lead of no more than three runs and has the opportunity to pitch for at least one inning, or (2) he enters the game, regardless of the count, with the potential tying run either on base, at bat, or on deck; or (3) he pitches three or more innings regardless of the lead and the official scorer credits him with a save.
  • Saved by the Bell [Boxing] When a fighter is on the verge of being knocked out or is knocked out just as the bell sounds so that the fighter does not lose and has a minute to compose himself. Generally no longer allowed in professional matches.
  • Saved on Rail [Golf] Benefiting from a rail position and missing/avoiding trouble.
  • Saves (Sv) [Baseball] Number of times a relief pitcher finishes a game where the potential tying or winning run is on base, at home plate or in the on-deck circle. Also the number of times a relief pitcher pitches the final three innings of a win; or the number of times a reliever pitches one inning or more in which he protects a lead of three runs or less.
  • Savidlin [Archery] A type of bear arrow, Point Barrow.
  • Saving Grace [Bingo] 68
  • Saving the Car/Tires [Motor Sports] Driving a car somewhat moderately to conserve the cars mechanical parts and lessen tire wear. This allows a driver to be more aggressive during the all-important final laps.
  • Sawbuck [Poker] $10 or a $10 bill.
  • Sawdust Joint [Poker] 1) A card room or casino that caters to a low-class crowd, sometimes implying a place whose denizens include thieves. Comes from a time when taverns had hardwood floors and sawdust sprinkled on the floor to absorb spilled drinks. 2) Any gambling house of less-than-opulent surroundings, as opposed to a carpet joint.
  • Sawing on the Wheel [Motor Sports] When a driver violently turns the wheel back and forth to regain control of the race car.
  • Sawski [Poker] $10 or a $10 bill.
  • Sax [Poker] 6 (the card, or the lowball hand).
  • Say [Poker] Announce in turn whether one is betting or passing.
  • Saya [Martial Arts] The scabbard of a samurai sword.
  • Sb [Poker] Shorthand, particularly in e-mail and Internet postings, for small blind.
  • Sb Success% [Baseball] Stolen Bases divided by (Stolen Bases plus Caught Stealing).
  • Sb% [Baseball] Stolen Base Percentage
  • Sba [Blackjack] The acronym for Statistical Blackjack Analyzer, blackjack software by Karel Janecek.
  • Sc [Lotto] An abbreviation used to describe a scratch card with the latex scratched off.
  • Scabbards [Bobsledding] Guards of wood or metal that are used to protect the runners while the sled is being transported.
  • Scale [Sailing] Climb.
  • Scale of Weights [Horse Racing] A schedule of set weights that must be carried by horses according to age, sex, distance and time of year to equalize competition.
  • Scale Room [Greyhound Racing] An area within the Paddock where the greyhounds are weighed on a calibrated scale by the Clerk of Scales.

T

  • T [Poker] Abbreviation for a 10, usually found only in written text about cards.
  • T&S [Motor Sports] Timing and Scoring staff. They take and record laptimes and produce race results.
  • T'ai Chi Ch'uan [Martial Arts] Usually known simply as "tai chi," this Chinese martial art emphasizes slow, smooth movements and is commonly practiced to improve self-control and teach calmness. However, it does also have martial applications.
  • T-Bone [Motor Sports] Occurs when a car is hit ,during a wreck, in the door. The two cars make a T shape. Is a very dangerous type of wreck for a driver to be involved in.
  • T-Boning [Motor Sports] An accident where one car runs into another, hitting it square in the left side.
  • T-Head [Motor Sports] Exhaust valve on one side and inlet valve on the other side of the cylinder. (Twin-camshafts).
  • T-Ne [Motor Sports] During a wreck, when a car is hit in the door. The two cars make a T shape.
  • T.E.D. [Bingo] An electronic dauber system used to play multiple packs at once. These usually require a rental fee and only one is allowed per player.
  • T.S.W. [Horse Racing] This Season's Wins: The number of wins by the horse in the current racing season.
  • T.S.W.$. [Horse Racing] This Season Win Only $: The amount of Winning prizemoney accumulated from Licensed Trotting Meetings by the horse this season.
  • Tab [General] Totalisator Agency Board. The body appointed to regulate off-course betting (bets made by people who are not present at the race track).
  • Tab Card [Poker] A credit account available in some clubs to favored customers (generally those on whom a credit check has been run), to which a player can charge chips to play on. This is a convenient means for a player to get around the difficulty of carrying large amounts of cash on his person. The tab card is usually kept track of on a ledger card with transactions initialed by the player or a house official or both. The cashier is usually responsible for keeping the records straight. In most clubs, a player is supposed to leave a check for the amount charged at the end of a playing session if he does not cash in as much as he charged. Frequently a player with charging privileges does so against a blank, signed check. If he loses, he fills out the check for the proper amount; if he wins, the blank check remains attached to his tab card, to be used the next time. When such a player calls for chips at the table, he usually fills out a charge slip, called a ticket, for the amount requested.
  • Tabernacle [Sailing] A hinged support for the bottom of a mast so that the mast can be lowered easily when passing under bridges.
  • Table [Poker] 1) A poker table. 2) Any surface on which players play poker (such as a kitchen table). 3) A complete poker game, players and all. "Seat open on table four." 4) Figuratively, the players in a particular game. "The table took a break." 5) The board, that is, the up cards of all players.
  • Table Captain [Poker] A humorous name for the player who takes it upon himself to arbitrate in all matters requiring decisions, settle all disputes, and interpret all rules. Such a role is generally only required in a private game, because most card room games are dealt by house dealers; even where they are not, usually a floor person is available to make decisions. Nonetheless, someone often takes it upon himself to arbitrate every decision even in a card room, and the other players call him the table captain.
  • Table Cards [Poker] 1) Community cards. 2) Spread one's cards on the table (as opposed to discarding them or holding them in one's hand off the table) at showdown time for all to see; usually rendered table one's [your, my, etc.] cards. Some clubs require the winning hand to be tabled. Some sometimes rule that if a hand is tabled and then thrown away and the pot inadvertently awarded to a lesser hand, and it is discovered later that the best hand was actually tabled, that the pot should be awarded to that hand even if it is no longer technically live.
  • Table Change [Poker] If you're playing at a public card room, and you'd like to play at a table other than the one you're currently at, you can ask the floor for a table change. Different card rooms handle this differently, but typically you'll be moved as soon as an opening develops, and a player from the seating list will be moved into your seat.
  • Table Charge [Poker] A portion of each pot taken by the house, for the purpose of paying expenses and making a profit. Also, rake.
  • Table Cop [Poker] A player who calls with the intention of keeping other players honest (e.g., to snap off bluffs) is said to be playing table cop. Also a player who makes an effort to point out violations (significant and otherwise) of casino rules (e.g., reminding other players to act in turn, which is properly the responsibility of the dealer).
  • Table Fee [Poker] An amount of money collected either on the button or every half hour by the card room. This is another way for the house to make its money.
  • Table Holdout [Poker] A holdout machine, a spring or clip attached to the underside of a table to hold one or more cards until the thief who put them there can retrieve them for reintroduction into the game for cheating purposes.
  • Table Hopping [Blackjack] Moving from one table to another in rapid succession while playing. Often used in conjunction with wonging.
  • Table Setter [Baseball] Batter whose job is to get on base for other hitters to drive him in. Usually a leadoff or No. 2 hitter.
  • Table Stakes [Poker] 1) Table stakes is simply the (nearly universal) rule that a player may only wager money they have on the table at the beginning of a hand. Usually it also implies that money may not be removed from the table at any time (exceptions are made for tipping), although money may be added to one's stacks between hands. A player who goes all-in at a table stakes game may not continue to bet, and is eligible only for the main pot. 2) Sometimes "table stakes" also implies no-limit play.
  • Table Stakes Limit [Poker] The original term for what is now usually called table stakes
  • Table Talk [Poker] Any discussion at the table of the hand currently underway, especially by players not involved in the pot, and especially any talk that might affect play. Depending on the nature of the discussion, table talk is often considered somewhere between rude and an act of war. The most common example of table talk to be avoided is announcing what cards you've folded.
  • Table Test [General] See Audition.
  • Tachi [Martial Arts] A Japanese long sword worn slung from a sword belt. Like the katana, the tachi had a single-edged curved blade.
  • Tachi Rei [Martial Arts] "Standing bow." A salutation common to numerous Japanese martial arts.
  • Tachometer [Motor Sports] The instrument gauge that shows engine speed, or revolutions per minute. On a vehicle with manual transmission, the driver can use the tachometer to tell when to upshift or downshift. Also called tach.
  • Tack [Sailing] (1) The lower forward corner of a triangular sail (2) The direction that a boat is sailing with respect to the wind. See also port tack and starboard tack. (3) To change a boat's direction, bringing the bow through the eye of the wind.
  • Tack Rooms [Horse Racing] Name given to rooms in the barn area of a race track in which items necessary for the training and racing of horses are kept.
  • Tacking [Sailing] (1) To change a boat's direction, bringing the bow through the eye of the wind. (2) To tack repeatedly, as when trying to sail to a point up wind of the boat.
  • Tacking Turning [Skiing] An uphill turn connecting two uphill traverses, maintaining a diagonal rhythm, with a lesser variation of the kick turn.
  • Tackle [Football] A player position on both the offensive and defensive lines; there is usually a left and right offensive tackle, and a left and right defensive tackle; See also tackling.
  • Tackling [Soccer] The act of taking the ball away from a player by kicking or stopping it with one's feet; only a minimal amount of shoulder-to-shoulder contact, called a charge, is permitted to knock the ball carrier off balance.
  • Tae Kwon do [Martial Arts] "Way of hands and feet." The primary form of Korean unarmed combat, named during a conference of chung do kwan masters in 1955. It is considered the most popular martial art in the world.
  • Taffrail [Sailing] A rail around the stern of a boat.
  • Tag [Horse Racing] Claiming price.
  • Tag 1. [Baseball] An action runners must perform before they can advance on a fly ball. Runners must touch the base they occupy after the ball is caught before they can try to advance. Runners can leave their base before a ball it hit, but must return and touch the base if the ball is caught. 2. An action executed when a defensive player touches a runner with the ball in an attempt to get them out.
  • Tag Up [Baseball] A rule allowing the base runner to return to his originating base when a fly ball is hit, who can then advance to the next base once the ball is caught by a defender.
  • Tagamet [Horse Racing] Trade name for the drug cimetidine, a medication used to treat ulcers.
  • Tahoe [Poker] A variant of pineapple in which players do not discard any of their three down cards. At the showdown, players can use none, one, or two of their down cards (but not three) to form their best five-card hand in combination with the five community cards. When played high-low split, a different set of cards can be used for each direction, but no more than two for either direction. Also called lazy pineapple.
  • Tahoe High-Low [Poker] Tahoe pineapple, played high-low split.
  • Tahoe Pineapple [Poker] A variant of pineapple in which players do not discard any of their three down cards. At the showdown, players can use none, one, or two of their down cards (but not three) to form their best five-card hand in combination with the five community cards. When played high-low split, a different set of cards can be used for each direction, but no more than two for either direction. Also called lazy pineapple.
  • Tahoe Split [Poker] A poker game, seven-card stud high-low split, with an 8 qualifier for low.
  • Tai [Martial Arts] Body
  • Tai Chi Chuan [Martial Arts] "Grand ultimate fist." An internal system of kung fu, also called soft boxing, characterized by its deliberately slow, continuous, circular, well-balanced and rhythmic movements.
  • Tai Sabaki [Martial Arts] Dodging techniques
  • Taihen-Jutsu [Martial Arts] (Japanese) Martial Art composed of low stances, sweepings, dodges, falling and rolling exercices. Taihen-Jutsu makes part of the Ninpô-Tai-Jutsu.
  • Taijutsu [Martial Arts] "Body art." A generic term for a system of empty-hand combat.
  • Tail [Sailing] (1) The end of a line. (2) A line attached to the end of a wire to make it easier to use. (3) To gather the unused end of a line neatly so that it does not become tangled.
  • Tail Fin [Powerboating] An aerodynamic surface mounted vertically on the superstructure, near the transom, to improve directional stability; sometimes called the air rudder.
  • Tail-Hopping [Skiing] Unweightingof the tails of the skis, most easily performed on Alpine skis.
  • Tailed Off [Horse Racing] A horse that drops so far back during a race, that it is out of touch with the rest of the field.
  • Taisho [Martial Arts] The captain of a team.
  • Taiso [Martial Arts] Warm-up exercises
  • Take [Rugby] A good catch of a kick.
  • Take (Or Takeout) [Horse Racing] Commission deducted from mutuel pools which is shared by the track and local and state governing bodies in the form of tax.
  • Take (Takeout) [Horse Racing] Commission deducted from mutuel pools which is shared by the track, horsemen (in the form of purses) and local and state governing bodies in the form of tax.
  • Take a Bath [Poker] Lose heavily.
  • Take a Flyer [Cycling] See flyer.
  • Take a Price [General] A wager on the underdog in a money line contest.
  • Take a Shot [Poker] 1) Use an angle (Any technically legal but ethically dubious way to increase your expectation at a game; a trick.).2) Look for a chance to play. "I'd sure like to take a shot in that game." 3) Make a cheating move. "He has to get a little booze in him before he takes a shot."
  • Take Care of [Poker] Toke, that is, tip the dealer, often implying with a good tip. If you win a big pot, you want to take care of the dealer
  • Take Down [Roulette] To recall a wager before a decision.
  • Take in [Sailing] (1) To remove a sail. (2) To add a reef to a sail.
  • Take it in the Middle [Poker] Sit down at the precise moment it is your turn to put in the middle blind. Some clubs do not let a new player (new to the particular game) be dealt in until it is his turn to put in a blind, supposedly to prevent his getting any "free" hands. Some clubs permit a player to receive his first hand, if he is too late to get the big blind, in the middle position. In such case, the player must in the next three hands still put in an amount equal to how much he would put in if he sat through all three blinds. This requires putting in the dealer's blind when the deal is one position to his left, so that the dealer does not end up having to put too much in. Also, when the player takes it in the middle, the player to his left puts in an amount equal to that of what the middle blind ordinarily is. To take the middle blind is also called come in in the middle.
  • Take it or Leave it [Poker] A form of five-card stud, found only in home games, a high-low game in which, after each player has been dealt one down card, each player gets a choice, in order, on each succeeding card. When each player has one down card, there is a betting round. The dealer then offers a card off the deck to the first player. If the player wants that card, he keeps it. If he does not want it, he immediately gets the next card off the deck, and the first card is offered to the second player, who has the same options. He can take the card, or immediately get the next card off the deck, in which case that card is offered to the third player, and so on. This continues until everyone has one up card, at which point there is a second round of betting. Any card that goes all the way around the table without stopping at anyone, including the dealer, becomes dead. After the betting has been equalized, the operation starts all over, with a card being offered in turn to each player. After each time of each player having the same number of upwards another round of betting comes. After each player has four upwards, each player has the opportunity of replacing an upward with an upward, or the down card with another down card (the twist), followed again, of course, by another round of betting, and then a declaration, and then the determination of the two winners. This game is sometimes called take it or leave it, shove 'em along, or push. It is also sometimes called pass the trash, although that name is more often reserved for Anaconda.
  • Take Off a Card [Poker] To call a single bet in order to see one more card.
  • Take Off the Gloves [Poker] To use an aggressive betting strategy to bully opponents.
  • Take One for the Team! [Baseball] Response from offensive batting side when their batter is nearly hit by the pitched ball. If he had been hit, he would have been able to get on base automatically. Often a flippant or joking comment. This phrase is often used in Australian club baseball in this situation but may originate from America.
  • Take the Body [Ice Hockey] To body check an opponent.
  • Take the Lead [Poker] 1) Bet or raise, generally when passed to, or sometimes in an aggressive fashion. 2) Make the first voluntary bet in any round.
  • Take the Middle Blind [Poker] Sit down at the precise moment it is your turn to put in the middle blind. Some clubs do not let a new player (new to the particular game) be dealt in until it is his turn to put in a blind, supposedly to prevent his getting any "free" hands. Some clubs permit a player to receive his first hand, if he is too late to get the big blind, in the middle position. In such case, the player must in the next three hands still put in an amount equal to how much he would put in if he sat through all three blinds. This requires putting in the dealer's blind when the deal is one position to his left, so that the dealer does not end up having to put too much in. Also, when the player takes it in the middle, the player to his left puts in an amount equal to that of what the middle blind ordinarily is. To take the middle blind is also called come in in the middle.
  • Take the Odds [Craps] An additional wager on come, don't come, place, and don't place bets after the come-out roll. This is called to wager behind or to take the odds. You can wager behind x times the amount you could win, where x is the number of odds allowed. If you are playing craps with 2x odds it looks like this: you bet $10, you could win $20 and hence wager $40 behind. Some casinos offer up to 100x odds. To wager behind is what a good craps player will do and a criteria of a good craps game is how many odds the casino offers you. As the amount of allowed odds increases, the house advantage decreases considerably. When making the odds bet 1x the house edge is 0.85% / 0.68% (pass / don't pass). When making the odds bet 2x the house edge is cut down to 0.61% / 0.45% already.
  • Take the Points [General] A wager on the underdog in a point spread contest.
  • Take the Worst of it [Poker] Fighting the odds; usually preceded by take the or have the; a situation in which a wager has an unfavorable return. Opposite of best of it.
  • Take-Off Point [Equestrian Sports] The best point at which a horse should jump in order to clear an obstacle.
  • Take-Off Shot [Croquet] A croquet shot in which the strikers ball travels a great distance, but the croqueted ball moves very little.
  • Takeaway [Golf] The beginning of the backswing, when the club is taken away from the ground.
  • Takedown [Wrestling] A takedown occurs when, from a neutral position, a wrestler gains control over his opponent down on the mat and is inbounds.
  • Taken Down [Craps] A bet that is removed and returned to the player, either at his request or by the rules of his play.
  • Taken on [Horse Racing] See attacked. The leader of the race is sometimes "taken on" by another runner.
  • Taken Up [Horse Racing] A horse pulled up sharply by his rider because of being in close quarters.
  • Takeoff [Diving] The moment at which the diver lifts from the board or platform to begin execution of the dive.
  • Takeout [Horse Racing] The percentage taken out of every dollar wager, and split between state, track and purses; generally, in pari-mutuel racing, the percentage taken out is usually between 15-20% for straight wagers and 20-25% for exotic wagers.
  • Takhsh [Archery] An Indo-Persian multi-bolt crossbow.
  • Taking [General] Wagering on the underdog; taking the odds.
  • Taking a Lead [General] An early bet with a favorable price in anticipation of a subsequent movement in the line.
  • Taking a Price [General] Betting an underdog
  • Taking a Set [General] When a bookmaker increases the odds of a favoured horse, which he or she believes can't win the race, in order to receive more bets.
  • Taking Air Off the Spoiler [Motor Sports] A condition that occurs when one car pulls up behind another car making the lead car get loose. The lead car then must slow down allowing the second car to pass.
  • Taking the Air [Motor Sports] Occurs when one car pulls up behind another taking the flow of air off the spoiler. This affects the downforce of the lead car making it loose. The lead car then must slow down allowing the second car to pass.
  • Taking the Points [General] Betting the underdog and its advantage in the point spread.
  • Taking the Price [General] Betting the underdog and accepting money odds.
  • Tako [Archery] A blunt arrow tipped with horn, used of hunting bird, India.
  • Talent [Motor Sports] Television announcers.
  • Talking Chips [Poker] Winnings. That is, winners can afford to waste time gabbing, while the losers want to concentrate on playing. "He's got talking chips" means he's winning. Also called lobbying chips, walking chips.
  • Tall Buoy [Sailing] Also called a Dan buoy. A float with a flag at the top of a pole. Used to mark a position such as for a race or a man overboard.
  • Tall Pot [Poker] A large pot waiting to be won by someone; a large stack of chips in the center of the table, caused by excessive betting, that will look nice added to the stack of whoever wins it.
  • Talon [Poker] The un-dealt portion of the cards, sometimes also called the deck, stock, or stub.
  • Tame Shiwari [Martial Arts] Breaking techniques
  • Tan Tien [Martial Arts] Sea of chi." The psychic center located just below the naval, which protects the center of gravity and produces a reservior of force upon which to draw. Also known as "tan den.
  • Tandem [Skydiving] Parachute jumps in which two skydivers, usually an experienced skydiver and a passenger, share one parachute system. The student is in a separate harness that attaches to the front of the instructor's harness.
  • Tandem Rig [Rowing] A rowing arrangement in which each set of two adjacent riggers is on the same side of the boat.
  • Tandem Skydiving [Skydiving] The passenger and Instructor are harnessed together and use a the same main parachute, all controlled by the instructor so that the passenger can enjoy the ride.
  • Tandem Sprint [Cycling] The tandem sprint is like a match sprint, but it's ridden on two-man tandem bicycles over a 1,500-meter course.
  • Tanden [Martial Arts] Abdomen.
  • Tang [Sailing] A metal fitting on the mast that the spreaders are attached to.
  • Tang Soo do [Martial Arts] "Art of the Chinese hand." A Korean combative differing only slightly from Tae Kwon Do.
  • Tanto [Martial Arts] A Japanese dagger with a blade eight to sixteen inches long and carried by the samurai in addition to the katana.
  • Tap [Poker] Go all in, that is, bet all one's chips. Usually called tap off.
  • Tap City [Poker] To go broke.
  • Tap in [Golf] A very short putt; as a verb, to make such a putt.
  • Tap Off [Poker] Bet all your chips, or all the other guy's.
  • Tap Out [Blackjack] Losing your whole bankroll.
  • Tap Someone [Poker] In a no-limit game, bet all the other guy's chips. "I'll tap you" means I'm betting all you've got on the table, and you must either fold or put all your chips in the pot.
  • Tap you. [Poker] In a no-limit game, this means, "I bet all your chips."
  • Tap-Off [Poker] A bet of all your chips, or all the other guy's; usually followed by bet
  • Tap-Penalty [Rugby] A penalty kick on which the player taps the ball with the foot, then picks it up and passes it to a teammate.
  • Tape [Horse Racing] See barrier.
  • Tape-Measure Blast [Baseball] An extremely long home run.
  • Taped Off [Motor Sports] Usually refers to applying racer's tape to the brake duct opening in full bodied cars.
  • Taper Tip Shaft [Golf] One of a number of shafts manufactured with a tip section that varies in length and thickness below the first step. This type of shaft requires that a specific length, known as a discreet length, shaft be made for each club in a set. Taper tip shafts are more commonly used by OEM’s as compared to custom clubmakers.
  • Tapioca. [Poker] 1) "I'm tapping off," that is, betting all my chips. 2) Broke.
  • Tapoff [Poker] A bet of all your chips, or all the other guy's
  • Tapped [Poker] Broke.
  • Tapped Out [Poker] Out of money. Can refer to a player running out of money in the course of a hand, thus still active for the main pot; or can refer to a player who has lost his bankroll and can no longer play.
  • Tappet [Motor Sports] A pivoting actuator that opens and closes cylinder intake and exhaust valves.
  • Tarbil [Archery] A pellet crossbow, Malaysia.
  • Target / Target 21 / T.a.R.G.E.T. [Blackjack] Acronym for Table, Research, Grading and Evaluation Technique. An alternative system, originally formulated by Eddie Olsen and Jerry Patterson, to beat multi-deck Blackjack. TARGET's basic premise is that casino shuffling routines are non-random and tend to create biases in shoes, sometimes favoring the player (5% of the time) but mostly favoring the house (70%). The player must therefore identify and play in tables that show evidence of excess players' wins while avoiding tables which are "dealer-biased". A set of table-selection rules is provided, which focus on signs of players crowding the table (a lot of cigarette butts in the ashtrays, etc), for specific card sequences ("clumping") observed, etc. The system has been totally and convincingly shown to be pure snake oil, by a number of blackjack authors, through computer simulations, statistical analysis & logical arguments. [References: See Break the Dealer 1986 and BJ: A Winner's Handbook 1990, both by J. Patterson, for the system's presentation. Also see the comprehensive Sims on biased shoes in Blackjack Essays by Mason Malmuth, 1987. Also see Abdul Jalib's analysis of biases in his "In Search of Clumping" post archived in bjmath.com. See also Professional Blackjack by Stanford Wong 1994, for simulations and exhaustive analysis of streakiness & bias resulting from various shuffling procedures.]
  • Tarkash [Archery] A quiver form Central and Northern India. Cylindrical or elliptical in section covered with cloth or velvet.

U

  • U-Groove [Golf] Ype of groove used in iron face structure. More pronounced than traditional "V" grooves. See "Square Groove."
  • Ube [Blackjack] The acronym for Universal Blackjack Engine, software by John Imming.
  • Ubz [Blackjack] An abbreviation for Unbalanced Zen card-counting system.
  • Uchi [Martial Arts] Interior, inside
  • Uchi Deshi [Martial Arts] "Apprentice." An old Japanese practice where a student was apprenticed to a martial arts master in order to become an instructor in turn.
  • Uchi Hachiji Dachi [Martial Arts] Standing stance with the feet pointed towards the inside
  • Uchi Komi Uke [Martial Arts] Block (« going inside »)
  • Uchi Ude Uke [Martial Arts] Block with the forearm from the inside to the outside
  • Uchi Waza [Martial Arts] Striking techniques.
  • Uchi-Nagashi [Martial Arts] (Japanese) Dodging techniques used in the Wadô-Ryű Karate Style.
  • Ucw [Wrestling] Ultimate Championship Wrestling
  • Ude [Martial Arts] Forearm or arm.
  • Ude Garami [Martial Arts] An elbow hold that immobilizes the opponent's arm. Literally, "arm wrap."
  • Uechi Ryu [Martial Arts] An Okinawan style of karate founded by Kanbum Uechi. It is characterized by linear patterns and forceful breathing.
  • Uefa [General] Union of European Football Association.
  • Uer [Baseball] Unearned Runs
  • Ufc [Wrestling] Ultimate Fighting Championship
  • Uke [Martial Arts] The person to whom a technique is applied; often taken to mean the opponent.
  • Uke Waza [Martial Arts] Techniques of blocking blows.
  • Ukemi [Martial Arts] "Breakfalling." The art of using shock-dispersing action such as rolls and breakfalls to avoid injury when falling.
  • Ukemi Waza [Martial Arts] Techniques of rolling and falling safely.
  • Ulapa [Archery] A self bow convex on the back and concave on the belly, Surinam.
  • Ultralight Shaft [Golf] A class of composite shafts that weigh less than 2.00 ounces or 65 grams.
  • Ultrasound [Horse Racing] 1) Diagnostic ultrasound A technique which uses ultrasonic waves to image internal structures. 2) Therapeutic ultrasound a therapy to create heat and stimulate healing.
  • Uma Yumi [Archery] A bow used for shooting from horseback, Japan.
  • Umbrella [Ice Hockey] A formation often used by a team on the power play to spread the defense; so named because it resembles the shape of an open umbrella.
  • Umbrella Ball [Bowling] A high hit that nevertheless results in a strike; so called because the pins fan out as they fall into something like an umbrella pattern, rather than being scattered around.
  • Umbrella Liability Policy [Motor Sports] A liability coverage that goes above and beyond the normal coverage.
  • Umla [Archery] A vegetable poison used on arrows in New Guinea.
  • Umpire [Tennis] The umpire decides which player has won a point and also keeps the score. In major tournaments the umpire is assisted by a number of judges (e.g. line judges).
  • Unbackable [General] A horse which is quoted at short odds that investors decide is too short to return any reasonable amount for the money they outlay.
  • Unbalanced Count [Blackjack] A count in which the number of plus and minus cards is not equal. For example, the KO count has one more plus valued card than minus valued card, which makes it an unbalanced count.
  • Unbalanced Zen [Blackjack] An unbalanced version of Arnold Snyder's Zen Count.
  • Uncalled Bet [Poker] In any round of betting, a bet made by one player that is not matched by any other player (nor is any other player all in, which would still necessitate a showdown), thus giving the pot to the player who made the bet.
  • Uncle Charlie [Baseball] Curve ball.
  • Uncock [Golf] To straighten the wrists in the downswing.
  • Uncounterfeitable [Poker] In a high-low game with community cards (as Omaha or hold 'em), describing a nut low hand that still makes a nut low (the lowest possible hand based on the cards showing.) if one (after the turn) or two (on the flop) of the active low cards are duplicated. For example, in Omaha you hold A-2-3-J, and the board is 4-7-8-T. Even if the river is A or 2, you still have the nut low.
  • Under [General] A sports bet in which the bettor guesses that the total points scored by two teams will be under a certain figure.
  • Under Bare Poles [Sailing] Having no sails up. In heavy weather the windage of the mast and other spars can still be enough to move the boat.
  • Under Contract [Horse Racing] A trainer or rider formally signed for a specified time and compensation.
  • Under Double Wraps [Horse Racing] A horse that is racing exceptionally well and under restraint.
  • Under Pair [Poker] In hold 'em, a player's pair lower than any card among the community cards. For example, you start with 7-7, and the flop is A-Q-9.
  • Under Pressure [Horse Racing] To be given a hard time or experience a hard run during a race. A horse may be placed under pressure by another runner in the field, for instance, when being attacked for the lead. Under pressure may also refer to a horse that is finding it hard to keep up with the pace (is weakening), or is not responding to the driver's command to accelerate.
  • Under Punishment [Horse Racing] Horse being whipped and driven.
  • Under the Gun [Poker] The first player to act after the blind bets is said to be under the gun.
  • Under the Guns [Poker] The first player to act after the blind bets is said to be under the gun.
  • Under the Lee [Sailing] On the lee side of an object, protected from the wind.
  • Under Way [Sailing] A vessel in motion is under way.
  • Under Wraps [Horse Racing] Horse under stout restraint in a race or workout to keep it from pulling away from the competition by too large a margin.
  • Under-Led Pass [Ice Hockey] A pass behind or to one side of a teammate, making it difficult for him to control the puck.
  • Under-Raise [Poker] To raise less than the previous bet; allowed only if a player is going all-in.
  • Under-the-Gun Blind [Poker] A traveling blind game in which the first player to the dealer's left blinds the pot.
  • Underbet [Poker] In a big bet game, make a bet smaller than one ordinarily might or than the situation calls for, sometimes in the hopes of enticing a raise (when one has a "monster") and sometimes to keep from having to call a larger bet if one passed instead of betting.
  • Undercall [Poker] At the showdown, declare your hand as being worse than it is. Many card rooms, particularly in California, have a penalty for overcalling a hand, where they rule that if a player miscalls his hand as being better than it is, causing another player to discard his hand, he may lose claim to the pot; that is, the verbal announcement takes precedence over the actual cards. There is no penalty for under calling a hand, but, except for accidentally, it is usually done only to needle another player by making that player briefly think she has the winner.
  • Underclub [Golf] To use a club that does not give the distance required for the shot.
  • Underclubbing [Golf] Using a club that does not give the needed distance
  • Undercut [Poker] 1) Suffer an occurrence in low-hole-card-wild stud games in which a player's last down card is lower than his current lowest card, thus lowering the value of his hand. 2) Shuffle the deck in a cheating fashion, consisting of moving a prearranged packet from the bottom to the top of the deck, to produce a stacked deal
  • Underdog [Video Poker] A person or hand who is not mathematically favored to win a pot. For instance, if you flop four cards to your flush, you are not quite a 2:1 underdog to make your flush by the river (that is, you will make your flush about one in three times).
  • Underfull [Poker] Any full house other than that special hand known as big full, that is, three aces and two kings.
  • Underground Joint [Roulette] An illegal casino.
  • Underlay [Horse Racing] A horse racing at shorter odds than seems warranted by its past performances.
  • Underlisting [Golf] The rubber or paper material onto which a leather grip is wrapped.
  • Underplay [Poker] In a big bet game, make a bet smaller than one ordinarily might or than the situation calls for, sometimes in the hopes of enticing a raise (when one has a "monster") and sometimes to keep from having to call a larger bet if one passed instead of betting.
  • Underspin [Golf] Same as backspin.
  • Understeer [Motor Sports] Understeer occurs when the front wheels provide less steering than desired in a given direction. Usually the front wheels have lost adhesion and cannot steer effectively. This results in the vehicle "pushing" ahead and responding sluggishly to the steering wheel. Reducing speed can allow the front wheels to regain traction. Most vehicles are designed to exhibit understeer in normal conditions, because it is easier to control than oversteer.
  • Undertow [Sailing] Strong offshore current extending to the shore.
  • Underwriter [Motor Sports] A person who is trained to evaluate risks and determines rates for policies based on those risks.
  • Underwriting [Motor Sports] The process of verifying data and approving a loan.
  • Undong [Martial Arts] Exercise.
  • Undress. [Poker] In draw poker, an exhortation, by the dealer, for the players to discard and reveal how many cards they're drawing.
  • Unearned Premium [Motor Sports] The portion of an advanced premium that has not been used for coverage.
  • Unearned Run [Baseball] A run that scores because of a fielder's error. These runsare not charged to the pitcher.
  • Uneven Bars [Gymnastics] 1) A piece of apparatus consisting of two bars, 148 centimeters and 228 centimeters high and a maximum of 150 centimeters apart. 2) A women's event performed on the apparatus, featuring swings, releases and re-grasps, and moves from one bar to the other.
  • Unfit for Play [Golf] If the ball is badly cut or damaged then it can be replaced as long as you consult with your marker.
  • Unforced Error [Tennis] An error made while under no pressure from the opponent, e.g. mishitting a ball.
  • Unfurl [Sailing] To unfold or unroll a sail. The opposite of furl.
  • Unglued [Poker] On tilt (Playing poorly and irrationally due to emotional upset, often caused by the player in question having had a good hand beat by a freak draw from another player (often in complete disregard of the odds and good play) or the player having lost a pot because of his own bad play. Also called steaming, having one's nose open, opened up, unglued and being wide open.); usually preceded by come. "He just came unglued after he had pocket aces beat for the second time by the same live one."
  • Unidirectional Tire [Motor Sports] Tire whose tread pattern is designed to get optimum traction only when the tire is mounted to roll in one direction.
  • Uninsured Motorist Coverage [Motor Sports] Insurance which pays for costs resulting from a hit-and-run or an accident with an uninsured motorist.
  • Union [Rugby] The most common form of rugby, with 15 players on a side. See also league; sevens; tens.
  • Union Jack [General] 9 selections, 8 bets - 8 trebles from the diagram: A B C D E F G H I ABC, DEF, GHI, ADG, BEH, CFI, AEI, CEG.
  • Union Oil [Poker] 1) In lowball, a 7-6 hand; so called because a lowball hand is often expressed as a two-digit number composed of the top two cards of the hand, so a 7-6 can be called a 76. 2) In high, two pair, 7s and 6s. 3) In hold 'em, a 7 and 6 as one's first two cards.
  • Unit [Blackjack] This generally means a card counter's minimum bet. When a counter is spreading $25 to $200 and says he won 10 units, he means he won $250. Although if he is spreading $50 to $200 with only an occasional $25 bet, he might be talking about $50 units.
  • Unitized [Golf] A shaft in which one model can be used to build one entire set of irons or a one model may be used to build a full set of woods through successive trimming of the shaft tip section.
  • Unlap [Motor Sports] A driver down one lap passes the leader to regain position on the lead lap.
  • Unlimited Poker Dictionary [Poker] No limit (A poker game in which players can bet as much as they have in front of them on any given round.)
  • Unlimited Rebuy Tournament [Poker] A re-buy tournament in which players are permitted to re-buy as often as they wish, generally only during a certain period of time, as the first hour, the first three levels, etc
  • Unload [Poker] While cheating, get rid of unwanted cards, as drop them in one's lap, dispose of them in the discards, and so on.
  • Unloading (Shaft Unloading) [Golf] The point of maximum energy release as a shaft is swung.
  • Unluck for Some [Bingo] 13
  • Unmade Hand [Poker] In draw poker (high and low), a potentially winning hand that needs a good draw to become strong. Without a favorable draw, the hand is a probable loser. For example, in lowball, joker-ace-deuce-trey, plus some useless card like a king, is the best possible one-card draw, but it is still an unmade hand that can be spoiled by catching a pair or face card. In high, three cards to a straight flush plus the joker (and some other unrelated card that will be discarded on the draw) is a good unmade hand.
  • Unmarked Cards [Poker] A deck that has no markings, and presumably cannot be used for cheating (at least not by virtue of any marks).
  • Unnatural Money [General] Large wagers that suddenly appear against the conventional wisdom of the odds makers and handicappers.
  • Unpaid Shill [Poker] A player who plays in few pots, and when he does, makes small bets and rarely raises, basically just plays along, apparently trying to last as long as possible. Also, a player who is the first to get into a given game, and the last to leave.
  • Unpat [Poker] Draw out on someone's pat hand (usually in high draw poker). "No cards, huh? Let's see if I can unpat you
  • Unplayable Lie [Golf] A lie from which it's impossible to play the ball, such as when it's wedged between two rocks. The player is allowed to drop the ball, incurring a one-stroke penalty.
  • Unsportsmanlike Conduct [Soccer] Rude behavior.
  • Unsprung Weight [Motor Sports] The weight of the wheel, tire, and suspension parts that are not supported by the springs. More unsprung weight means more inertia in the suspension, which usually means less responsiveness and poorer handling, so reducing unsprung weight is a major preoccupation of suspension, wheel, and tire designers.
  • Unstitched Buffing Wheel [Golf] Type of wheel (approximately 6” in diameter) used along with a bench grinder and Glanz Wach to add a high luster to polyurethane-coated club heads.
  • Unsu [Martial Arts] Name of a Karate Kata
  • Untried [Horse Racing] 1) Not raced or tested for speed. 2) A stallion that has not been bred.
  • Unweighting [Skiing] Taking weight off the ski, usually prior to a turn.
  • Unwind [Horse Racing] Gradually withdrawing a horse from intensive training.
  • Up [Poker] Designates the higher card of a hand consisting of two pair. Thus, "Queens up" refers to two pair, of which the higher pair is queens and the lower pair is unspecified.
  • Up and Down [General] An "Up and Down" bet is an abbreviated method of writing two "Any to Come" bets, e.g., Ł1- win A "ATC" Ł1-win B - Ł1- win B "ATC" Ł1-win A. In different parts of the United Kingdom the wager is variously described as: "Cross Over," "Lap," "Over and Over," "Reverse," "Stakes About," "Twist" and "Vice Versa."
  • Up and Under [Rugby] A high, shallow kick that gives the kicking side a good chance to run under and recover it. Also known as a Garryowen, for the Irish club that invented it.
  • Up Card [Blackjack] The dealer's first dealt card, placed face up.
  • Up Final Strides [Golf] Won the race in the final stage.
  • Up for [Poker] Having one's name on the list (the board) for a particular game. "Are you up for the 20?"
  • Up Front [Poker] Pertaining to an early betting position. "He came out swinging up front," in a no-limit game, means that the first bettor made a large bet, and implies the bet was made with no hesitation.
  • Up Ice [Ice Hockey] In the direction of the team's attacking zone.See also caught up ice.
  • Up Jumped the Devil!. [Poker] 1) A player says this in draw poker or lowball, usually when drawing one card and turning that card face up for the table to see, and that card (presumably) makes the hand. Comes from craps, where it is used in the situation in which a player sevens out. 2. Sometimes a player says this when catching the joker (or hoping to).
  • Up Pops the Devil [Craps] Betting that the next roll will be the number of 7 (5&2).
  • Up Scope!. [Poker] I raise.
  • Up the Country [Croquet] Another name for taking croquet.
  • Up the Slope!. [Poker] I raise"; sometimes "Up the slope went the antelope.
  • Up to [Poker] Pertaining to the person whose turn it is to bet; often followed by a pronoun or the name of a player. "Who's it up to?" "It's up to Pete." A card room homily goes, "It's always up to the person who says, `Who's it up to?'"
  • Up to Tricks [Bingo] 46
  • Up-and-Back [Badminton] A doubles formation in which one partner is basically responsible for shots near the net, while the other is responsible for shots nearer the baseline.
  • Up-Unweighting [Skiing] Rising up to unweight the skis prior to turning. For Nordic skiers, this is often the easiest way of unweighting skis.
  • Upcard [General] The dealer’s exposed card.
  • Upcourt [Basketball] Same as downcourt, oddly enough.
  • Uphill [Poker] Fighting the odds; usually preceded by go. "You're going uphill whenever you're in a pot with him."
  • Uphill Diagonal-Striding [Skiing] A modified form of diagonal striding directly up a hill, by shortening the stride-length, quickening the tempo, and lowering the hips.
  • Uphill Lie [Golf] A lie on which a right-handed golfer's left foot is higher than the right foot.
  • Uphill Traversing [Skiing] Diagonal stridingup a hill at an angle (more than 0°, less than 90°) to the fall-line.
  • Uphill Turning [Skiing] Making a downhill turn away from the fall-line, and thus decreasing the angle of descent.
  • Uphill Two-Skating [Skiing] See offset skating.
  • Upright Lie [Golf] A club’s lie that is more upright than the standard specification for that particular head. For example, a 62 degree head would be 2 degrees upright if the stated specification was originally 60 degrees.
  • Upright Style [Croquet] Another name for the front style of swinging the mallet, which gives greater movement and more power.
  • Upright Swing [Golf] A swing in the club head is carried directly backward and upward from the ball, with little deviation from the center.
  • Uprights [Powerboating] Twin tail fins.
  • Ups [Poker] In high (draw, usually), the top pair in a two-pair hand. If two players have two pair, one might say, "What are your ups?" wanting to know whether the other has, for example, aces up, or kings up.
  • Upset [Basketball] When a higher-seeded (better) team loses to a lower-seeded (inferior) one.
  • Upside-Down [Motor Sports] A situation which occurs when the value of your vehicle is lower than the outstanding balance on your vehicle loan. Also called negative equity.
  • Upstairs!. [Poker] "I raise"; sometimes preceded by going
  • Upstream Gate [Canoeing] A gate on a slalom course that is to be traversed in the direction against the flow of the water. To be distinguished from a downstream gate.
  • Upw [Wrestling] Ultimate Pro Wrestling
  • Upwind [Sailing] To windward, in the direction of the eye of the wind.
  • Ura [Martial Arts] Reverse," "hidding," or "rear.
  • Ura Zuki [Martial Arts] Flip side punch (near distance punch)
  • Urahazu [Archery] The ends of a bow, Japan.
  • Uraken [Martial Arts] Reverse fist.
  • Uraken Uchi [Martial Arts] Back fist strike

V

  • V6 [Motor Sports] A vehicle with six cylinders. The cylinders are divided into two banks, each of which is angled away from the other at the top, forming a 'V'. Typically, this angle is 60 degrees on V-6 engines.
  • V8 [Motor Sports] A vehicle with eight cylinders. the cylinders are divided into two banks, each of which is angled away from the other at the top, forming a 'V'. Typically, this angle is 90 degrees on V-8 engines.
  • V Position [Skiing] The ski position that most jumpers use while in the air, with the skis touching or nearly touching at the tails and spread apart at the tips, thus forming a V.
  • V-1 Skating [Skiing] The American's preferred term for two-skating.
  • V-2 Skating [Skiing] The American's preferred term for one skating.
  • V-Type Engine [Motor Sports] In a V-6, V-8 or V-12 engine, the cylinders are divided into two banks, each of which is angled away from the other at the top, forming a 'V'. Typically, this angle is 60 degrees on V-6 engines and 90 degrees on V-8 engines.
  • V.M.D. [Horse Racing] Veterinary Medical Doctor.
  • V/H [Motor Sports] Vintage/Historic racing. Races for cars built and prepared to pre-1975 specs.
  • Vajramushti (India) [Martial Arts] Literally the "The Diamond Fist". This is a very ancient Martial Art and was created in India approximately thousand years before J.C. Vajramushti was practised by Indian priests and also by a caste of Indian warriors. The method resembles to boxing because of the fist attacks similar to modern boxing but contains also wrestling techniques.
  • Valentines Day [Bingo] 14
  • Valera Dominique [Martial Arts] (French) French Karateka born in 1947. One of the best european traditional Karate/Kumite fighters. Having problems with judging he then changed to Full Contact and became very famous.
  • Valet [Horse Racing] An employee who takes care of a jockey's equipment, ensures that the correct silks are at the jockey's locker, and the jockey has the proper weight in the lead pad. The valet carries the saddle and equipment to the paddock, helps the trainer in saddling the horse, meets the jockey after the race, and carries the saddle and equipment back to the jockey's room after the jockey has weighed in.
  • Validation [Bingo] Eligibility required to win additional jackpot amounts. Price varies by number of cards played.
  • Valle Card [Poker] Any 3, 5, or 7; comes from the game of panguingue, in which those cards have value (which is the meaning of the word valle) and for which other players pay a player who melds them
  • Value [Poker] 1) Getting paid off for a good hand (by someone who calls); often part of the phrase full value. A player in a lowball game who holds a pat bicycle, and busts three other players with it because of the way the action comes down, might say that he got value out of the hand. If he was not prone to understatement, he might even say that he got full value out of the hand. 2) The worth of a hand in comparison with its chances of winning. 3) Value means the return you get on your investment; the expected increase in your equity in the pot (your return), as compared to the size of your bet or raise (your investment).
  • Value Bet [Poker] Bet for value (Betting in order to raise the amount in the pot, not to make your opponents fold.).
  • Valve [Motor Sports] Device that opens and closes the combustion chamber of an internal-combustion engine to admit the fuel-air mixture or exhaust the gases.
  • Valve Float [Motor Sports] What happens when an engine is run at an RPM higher than what the valve train is capable of operating at, resulting in the valves' failing to close completely during the compression stroke. An engine suffering from valve float has a characteristic sound; the engine will suddenly began "cutting out", making a sort of rumbling, flatulent noise. Valve float causes loss of power and usually leads to engine damage.
  • Valve Train [Motor Sports] The valves and camshaft(s) within an engine, and any parts attached to the valves, such as rockers and pushrods, to move them up and down.
  • Valves [Motor Sports] Many overhead-cam engines, particularly multi-valve models, are described by the total number of intake and exhaust valves in the cylinder head. A 24-valve V-6 engine would have four valves per cylinder: two intake and two exhaust valves. A 16-valve V-8 engine has only the standard single exhaust and single intake valve for each of its eight cylinders.
  • Valves (E.G. 24 Valves) [Motor Sports] Signifies the total intake and exhaust valves in an engine. For example, a 24-valve V-6 would have 4 valves per cylinder: 24/6=4. A 16-valve V-8 would have 2 valves per cylinder: 16/8=2. More valves allow the engine to breathe better at high RPM and produce more power.
  • Van [Motor Sports] A box-shaped truck with a forward cab and a cargo area to the back bumper.
  • Van (The) [Horse Racing] Front of field. Head end.
  • Vandalism [Motor Sports] The willful physical damage to a property.
  • Vane [Sailing] A flat device that is affected by the wind. Vanes are used in wind direction indicators and some self steering gear systems.
  • Vang [Sailing] A hydraulic ram or block and tackle used to hold the end of the boom down.
  • Var [Blackjack] An abbreviation for variance.
  • Vardon Grip [Golf] The overlapping grip, so called because it was popularized by the great English golfer, Harry Vardon, early in the 20th century.
  • Variable Face [Golf] A golf club face (either in a wood or an iron) that exhibits a different face thickness on one or more areas of the face. Typically, variable face irons have thicker faces toward the sole, while variable face woods usually have thinner face perimeters and thicker centers.
  • Variable Pitch [Sailing] A type of propeller that has adjustable blades for varying speeds or directions, and may be able to reduce drag when under sail.
  • Variable Speed [Golf] Term given to a machine, such as a drill or drill press, that can be run at more than one speed. Slow speeds are better for cutting metals, while faster speeds drill wood more efficiently.
  • Variable-Assist Steering [Motor Sports] A power-steering system that varies the amount of assistance it provides according to driving conditions. It provides maximum assistance at low speeds for maneuvers such as turning into a parking space or turning a corner after leaving a stop light. It provides minimum assistance at cruising or highway speeds to provide greater vehicle stability.
  • Variance [Poker] Variance is the statistical measure of just how widely your results will be dispersed. If you have a sufficient advantage at the game you're playing, you expect to make money over the long haul. This is true whether the game is poker, blackjack, or craps, and whether your advantage is due to skill, cheating, or psychic powers.
  • Variation [Sailing] Magnetic variation. The difference between magnetic north and true north, measured as an angle. Magnetic variation is different in different locations, so the nearest compass rose to each location on a chart must be used.
  • Vault [Gymnastics] An event performed over the vaulting horse by both men and women. The gymnast races down a runway, vaults from a springboard onto the horse, landing with the hands, and then vaults off to a standing position. Each competitor performs two vaults and the scores are averaged.
  • Vaulting Horse [Gymnastics] A piece of apparatus, 35 centimeters wide by 160 centimeters long, used for the vault. The men's vaulting horse is 135 centimeters high, the women's 120 centimeters high.
  • Vector [Sailing] A line drawn to indicate both the direction and magnitude of a force, such as leeway or a current.
  • Vectors [Croquet] Vectors are lines defined by moving objects. For instance, when red is struck the line that red travels is its vector. If red were not affected by any other forces, it would travel at the same speed and direction to infinity. However, red may strike yellow, in which case yellow will alter the direction and speed of red, as well as moving along its own vector at an equal and opposite direction from that of red. (see Newtonian physics).
  • Vee (Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis) [Horse Racing] A highly contagious disease affecting the central nervous system that can cause illness or death in horses and humans.
  • Vee Engine [Motor Sports] An engine with cylinders arranged in two rows at an angle to the common crankshaft. Has a "V" shape when viewed from the front.
  • Veer [Sailing] A shifting of the wind direction, opposite of backing. Clockwise in the northern hemisphere, counter-clockwise in the southern hemisphere.
  • Vegas Night [Bingo] An event held for a specific period of time (generally beginning in the afternoon and ending by midnight) during which a qualified organization is entitled to hold casino-style gaming events. Games conducted include: Pulltabs, bingo, roulette, blackjack, poker, craps, gin rummy, five card stud poker, and merchandise wheels. Also Casino Night.
  • Vehicle Identification Number (Vin) [Motor Sports] A seventeen-digit identification number, unique to each vehicle, which includes codes for the manufacturer, year, model, body, and engine specifications.
  • Velocity [Golf] The speed of a golf ball. Also known as initial velocity, the USGA limits conforming balls to velocities of no more than 250 feet per second (76.2m/s) as measured on USGA test equipment. A 2% tolerance is allowed at a test temperature of 23 degrees Celsius +/-1.
  • Velocity Made Good [Sailing] Also VMG. Actual boat speed after adjusting for such factors as current and leeway.
  • Velodrome [Cycling] A track built specifically for bicycle racing, made up of two long straights and two short, curved end sections that are sharply banked. Most velodromes are 1/3 of a kilometer around, though some are as short as 200 meters and others as long as 500 meters.
  • Vent [Motor Sports] Hose On an Indy car, the alternative to a catch can for recovering fuel that overflows from the fuel cell during the refueling process.
  • Vent Man [Motor Sports] Pit crew man who handles the vent hose.
  • Vented Disc Brakes [Motor Sports] A brake disc that has cooling passages between the friction surfaces.
  • Ventral [Horse Racing] Down; toward the belly.
  • Venue [Keno] A Club or Hotel where Gaming Machines are played. Also known as a Site.
  • Verb [General] The process of giving Prices to possible results.
  • Verbal Bet [Poker] A wager made by announcing the size of the bet but without actually putting any chips or money in the pot. In some (not all) establishments, oral declarations made in turn are binding; nonetheless, cautious players wait till the chips are actually in the pot before either calling the bet or showing their hands.
  • Verbal Declaration [Poker] A statement made by a player on his turn of his intentions: pass, fold, bet, or raise (and, in a no-limit game, how much). Also called verbal declaration.
  • Vertical [Skiing] A section of a cross-country course where there is an uphill climb.
  • Vertical Clearance [Sailing] The distance between the water level at chart datum and an overhead obstacle such as a bridge or power line.
  • Vertical Flow Weighting [Golf] The method of flow weighting in which the weight moves vertically from a concentration of weight toward the sole of long irons to more traditional weighting on short irons.
  • Vertical Position [Synchro Swimming] A position in which the body is extended perpendicular to the surface with the head down and the legs together. Head, hips and ankles should be in line.
  • Verticals [Powerboating] Same as uprights.
  • Very Lightweight Shaft [Golf] A weight classification of shafts that falls within 3.40-3.79 ounce weight range for steel or alloy shafts and 2.00-3.19 ounces for composite shafts.
  • Very Quick Flashing [Sailing] A navigational aid with a light that flashes between 80 and 159 times per minute. Usually around twice per second.
  • Vest Holdout [Poker] A kind of holdout machine (A mechanical device enabling thieves to surreptitiously hold out. Holdout machines used to be more popular many years ago, but are not often seen now, probably because thieves are becoming more sophisticated, and also because being caught with one is dangerous.). A vest holdout is worn under a thief's coat. Also called breastworks.
  • Vet's List [Horse Racing] List of ill or injured horses declared ineligible for racing by the track veterinarian.
  • Veteran Free Agent [Basketball] A player who completes his contractual obligation to his team and becomes free to sign with any NBA team, as per terms of the Collective Bargaining Agreement.
  • Veterinarian [Horse Racing] Commission The commission (or board) veterinarian, sometimes referred to as the state veterinarian, is usually appointed by the state racing commission. This person serves as professional adviser and consultant to the State Racing Commission on veterinary matters including all regulatory aspects of the application and practice of veterinary medicine at the track. Association Sometimes referred to as the track veterinarian, this person is employed by the racing association and serves as a professional adviser and consultant to the racing association and its operational staff at the track. Practicing Private practitioner employed by owners and trainers on an individual case or contract basis.
  • Vft [Golf] Eneric term applied to Variable Face Technology. See "Rebound Effect" and "Trampoline Effect." Also the name given to a line of Callaway woods and irons.
  • Vg [Greyhound Racing] ValleyGreyhound
  • Vhf [Sailing] (1) Very High Frequency radio waves. (2) A radio that transmits in the VHF range. VHF radios are the most common communications radio carried on boats, but their range is limited to "line of sight" between the transmitting and receiving stations. Also see single sideband.
  • Vic [Roulette] Sucker. Short for victim.
  • Vice Skip [Curling] The assistant captain, who assists the skip in planning strategy and tactics.
  • Victory Lane [Motor Sports] After winning the driver proceeds to an area of the race track grounds designated as Victory Lane for official ceremonies such as interviews, photos and presentation of the trophy and winnings. The ultimate destination of any race car driver.
  • Victory Lap [Motor Sports] A celebratory lap taken by a race winner, after the race is over. Generally, the driver will remove helmet or gloves and wave to the fans.
  • Victory Rip [Poker] In a draw game, at the showdown, spreading your hand triumphantly. (It's usually done in the same manner that a blackjack or poker dealer spreads an entire deck fanned face up on the table in front of her. Spreading one's hand in this fashion, by the way, is something of a needle, and is not practiced by a refined player, who, when he has an obvious powerhouse, gently and diffidently turns it face up on the table.)
  • Victory Roll [Poker] In a draw game, at the showdown, spreading your hand triumphantly. (It's usually done in the same manner that a blackjack or poker dealer spreads an entire deck fanned face up on the table in front of her. Spreading one's hand in this fashion, by the way, is something of a needle, and is not practiced by a refined player, who, when he has an obvious powerhouse, gently and diffidently turns it face up on the table.)
  • Video Controller [Skiing] An official who watches on closed circuit television. If the video controller believes that a skier missed a gate, it must be reported to the gate controller.
  • Video Endoscope [Horse Racing] See endoscope.
  • Video Keno [Keno] Keno played on a computerized machine similar to video poker. Uses a random number generator to pick the numbers.
  • Video Lottery Terminal (Vlt) [Lotto] Electronic games of chance played on a video screen. They often simulate popular casino games such as blackjack, poker, or spinning-reel slot machines. Unlike slot machines, video lottery terminals do not dispense money. Rather, a winning player is provided a ticket that is redeemed by the retailer for prizes.
  • Video Patrol [Horse Racing] The system by which video cameras are strategically placed around a racing oval to broadcast and record the running of each race from each possible angle.
  • Video Poker Dictionary [Poker] The game played on a video poker machine.
  • Video Poker Machine [Video Poker] The use of a video display to simulate the real game of poker. There are literally hundreds of models of Video Poker Machine. Broadly, these may be categorized into the types: Jacks or Better, Bonus Poker - bigger payoffs for certain hands, Wild Card Games like Deuces Wild and Joker Poker. By law, the Payoff Table listing the payout for each winning hand must be posted on each machine. Also by law, each machine must operate by drawing randomly from one deck of cards. There is no motivation for Casinos to try to cheat on the random draw, since there is no law against a Payoff Table with a lousy Maximum Average Payback.
  • Vig [Blackjack] 1. A colloquial expression for the house advantage on a game. 2. Used to describe any fee collected for play. It derives from a gangland term for the interest charged by loan sharks and is short for vigorish.
  • Vig or Vigorish [Roulette] The casino tax on a bet. Also known as juice.
  • Vigorish [General] Bookmaker's commission, most often refers to the 11 to 10 football bettors lay on straight wagers. Also known as juice.
  • Village People [Poker] Four queens.
  • Vinyl Shaft Clamp [Golf] Type of clamp used to hold a club in a vise. The clamp holds the club by the shaft; the fact it is made of vinyl (or rubber) prevents damage to the shaft.
  • Violation [Basketball] An infraction of the rules that doesn't result in a free throw; however, the ball is turned over to the opposing team for a throw-in. Also known as a floor violation.
  • Vip [Baccarat] A Very Important Person. Usually a big bettor or a high roller.
  • Viraton, Vireton [Archery] A crossbow bolt with spiral fletching.
  • Vires, Viroax [Archery] A crossbow bolt used for hunting.
  • Virgin [Lotto] A colloquial term popular among regular players that refers to a number or number combination that has never been drawn. Few virgin numbers remain in the older lottery states. This term is almost exclusively used to refer to daily numbers games, as four-digit and lotto-type games have such a large number of combinations that many, if not almost every one is a "virgin" combination.
  • Virgorish [General] The commission the bookmaker receives.
  • Virgornish [General] The commission paid to the bookmaker.
  • Virtuosity [Gymnastics] The amount of rhythm and harmony displayed during a movement.
  • Vis-a-Vis [Motor Sports] A four-seater in which two passengers faced the driver. Used around the turn of the century.
  • Viscoelastic Material [Golf] A proprietary material used by the Cleveland Golf Company to assist in providing vibration absorption in their patented VAS™ clubs.
  • Vise Pad(s) [Golf] Typically made of wood covered by thick felt, vise pads are used to secure a club head in a vise without damaging it during work on the club. May also be made of hard rubber.
  • Visor [Luge] A rounded sheat of clear or tinted plastic attached to the front of the helmet to protect the face.
  • Visual Bearing [Sailing] A bearing taken by visually observing the location of known landmarks.
  • Visual Fix [Sailing] A fix taken by visually observing the location of known landmarks.
  • Visual Wheel Tracking [Roulette] The ability to judge where the ball will land by sight.
  • Vl [Greyhound Racing] Victoryland, Alabama
  • Vmg [Sailing] Velocity made good. Actual boat speed after adjusting for such factors as current and leeway.
  • Vocal Folds [Horse Racing] The membranes attached to the arytenoid cartilages in the larynx. Vibration produces vocalization.
  • Void [Motor Sports] A term used to describe a policy contract that is free of all legal effect.
  • Void Bet [General] A bet which is declared invalid. The stake is returned without deduction
  • Voisins Du Zero [Roulette] It's a bet on a specific group of numbers on a section of the roulette wheel neighboring the zero. This is a French phrase which is common in European casinos.
  • Voiture Legere [Motor Sports] A light car, especially a racing car falling between the heavy cars and the voiturette. Term seldom used to describe production cars. Not used after 1914.
  • Voiturette [Motor Sports] Early two-seater touring car. Name first used by Leon Bollee and then applied to any small car.
  • Volar Neurectomy (High Nerved) [Horse Racing] This operation is performed on the volar nerve that lies between the bottom of the knee and the fetlock joint. Horses that have been high nerved are barred at most race tracks.
  • Volatility [Greyhound Racing] A measure of how widely the result of an event may vary, and therefore a measure of the risk involved in a market. For example, 'cricket runs' is a very volatile market whereas 'total goals' in an FA Cup final is not.
  • Volley [Table Tennis] To hit the ball before it has bounced. Illegal in table tennis; the offender loses the point.
  • Volume [Golf] A numerical designation given to the size of a wood head as measured by liquid displacement.
  • Vortex [Motor Sports] In wet conditions, race cars can produce vortexes off their rear ends or wings. These vapor trails are similar to those produced by the engines of jet planes.
  • Vp [Blackjack] The acronym for Video Poker.
  • Vs. 1st Batr (Relief) [Baseball] Describes what happened to the first batter a reliever faces.
  • Vs. 1st Batter (Relief) [Baseball] Describes what happened to the first batter a reliever faces.
  • Vscc [Motor Sports] Vintage Sports Car Club - Club for Vintage sports car owners.

W

  • W [Baseball] Wins
  • W2w or W/W [Motor Sports] Wheel to wheel racing. Traditional sports car racing with group starts, unlimited passing.
  • W / L [Blackjack] An abbreviation for win / loss.
  • W*Ing [Wrestling] Wrestling International New Generations
  • Wa [Martial Arts] "Accord." An ancient Japanese term for harmony, accord, and coordination.
  • Wado Ryu [Martial Arts] "Way of peace." A Japanese style of karate developed from jujutsu and earlier karate styles. It is one of the four major karate systems practiced in the world today.
  • Waffle Pad [Ice Hockey] A large rectangular pad attached to the front of the goalie’s stick hand.
  • Wager [General] Is a transaction on any event where an amount of money is staked.
  • Wagering Stamp [General] A federal occupational tax for gamblers.
  • Wagertype [Horse Racing] A type of bet offered at a racetrack.
  • Wages [Poker] What many professionals consider the minimum they should make per day, perhaps $100, or some multiple thereof. "How'd you do today?" "I made wages." That might mean the replier won $100
  • Waggle [Golf] Movement of the club head prior to swinging. A flourishing of the club behind and over the ball.
  • Wai-Gong [Martial Arts] (Chinese) Name of all Qi-Gong exercises which are executed in movement. These exercises are part of the external styles of Qi-Gong.
  • Waist [Skiing] The narrowest section of a ski between the tail and the tip.
  • Wait [Poker] Make no bet, but still hold your cards. You can check, and then call a later bet, fold when the action gets back to you, or raise. Technically, to check is to make a bet of nothing.
  • Wait for the Blind [Poker] Some clubs do not let a new player (new to the particular game) be dealt in until it is his turn to put in the blind, supposedly to prevent his getting any "free" hands. (Also, if a seated player has missed the blind in a particular round, he can receive his next hand only in the blind position.) In such a case, a player must come in on the blind, or, if not in the big blind position, over blind or post to receive a hand; otherwise, he must wait for the blind
  • Waiter [Poker] One who checks. (Make no bet, but still hold your cards. You can check, and then call a later bet, fold when the action gets back to you, or raise. Technically, to check is to make a bet of nothing.)
  • Waiting in the Weeds [Poker] The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds. For example, in a high draw game, you raised before the draw with three aces. Among the several callers, the first man took three cards and passed after the draw. Everyone else passed. You did not improve your hand, but three aces is worth a bet after the draw, so you bet. The three-card draw now raises. The others fold. You call. He shows his full house.
  • Waiting in the Woods [Poker] The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds. For example, in a high draw game, you raised before the draw with three aces. Among the several callers, the first man took three cards and passed after the draw. Everyone else passed. You did not improve your hand, but three aces is worth a bet after the draw, so you bet. The three-card draw now raises. The others fold. You call. He shows his full house.
  • Waive [Croquet] To pass on ones turn.
  • Waiver [Motor Sports] The agreement to forego premium payment during a period of disability.
  • Waivers [Baseball] A player usually takes three business days to clear waivers if no one claims him. Once he clears, the team can trade him, outright him to the minors (if he doesn't have 5 years of major league experience), or release him for the rest of the waiver period (the rest of the calendar month). If a player is claimed, the original team has 48 hours to let him go, pull him off, or negotiate a trade. Teams can put a maximum of seven players a week on waivers and can only make 40 claims a week. Almost every player is placed on waivers at some point during a season, but most will be pulled back or clear. When a player is placed on waivers, every team has a chance to claim him within three business days. If more than one team claims a player the team in the same league has preference and the team lower in the standings if all are in the same league (exception: in March and April, the standings from the previous standings are used). A player is often placed on waivers to be taken off the 40-Man roster, although in August and September a player must pass through waivers to be traded. The original team may block a claim and pull a player off waivers once a month. The next time a player is placed on waivers that month a claim cannot be blocked and the player automaticall goes to the other team. There are three main types of waivers: unconditional release waivers, irrevocable waivers, and procedural waivers (which allow players to be traded or sent outright to the minors). Waivers are completely confidential and officials may not disclose to the media the waiver status of any player.
  • Wake [Sailing] Waves generated in the water by a moving vessel.
  • Wake Up with a Hand [Poker] To be dealt a hand with winning potential.
  • Waki [Martial Arts] Side" or "flank.
  • Wakizashi [Martial Arts] "Short sword." The shorter of the samurai's two swords, with a blade of sixteen to twenty-three inches long.
  • Wales Conference [Ice Hockey] Was one of the two confrences in the NHL consisting of the Patrick and Adams Divisions until the 1992-93 season. The other conference was Campbell Conference. These were renamed the Eastern and Western Conferences respectively, starting with 1993-94 season.
  • Walk [Poker] 1) An unopened pot won by the blind (the largest blind, if there are more than one). 2) An uncalled pot won by the opener. 3) Be away from the table long enough to miss several hands. Sometimes card rooms try to prevent excessive walking with a third person walking rule.
  • Walk Hots [Horse Racing] To cool a horse out after a workout or race.
  • Walk Over [Poker] Cheat, particularly at cards or dice.
  • Walk the Course [Equestrian Sports] To measure a jumping course by pacing off strides between obstacles before a competition.
  • Walk-Away Lease [Motor Sports] Another name for a closed-end lease. A leasing contract in which the residual value, or final value, of the vehicle at the end of the term, has been specified. The lessee is not required to buy the vehicle, or make up any shortfall in its residual value.
  • Walker [Poker] One who leaves a poker table for extended periods of time, or, sometimes, just someone away from a table (for example, to have a smoke break or eat a meal).
  • Walkers [Poker] Players who walk frequently away from the table. Such people, and/or people who do so frequently, are called walkers. Depending on local conditions, walkers may be off getting food, smoking, playing craps, or waiting for more fish to sit down. Most card rooms have well-defined but poorly enforced rules about walkers - i.e., that a player's chips may be picked up (by the house, that is) after they've been gone for some specific amount of time. Too many walkers at a table can cause it to break, often through an unfortunate chain reaction. Once one or two players get up from the table, it makes it more likely for others to walk, or just leave.
  • Walking [Basketball] See traveling.
  • Walking Chips [Poker] Winnings. "He's got lobbying chips" means, simply, "He's winning." So called because generally winners lobby, not losers. The losers have to concentrate on playing to get even; the winners can afford to relax and sit out a few hands.
  • Walking Ring [Horse Racing] Oval near paddock enclosure, where horses walk and riders mount before the start of post parade.
  • Walking the Dog [Motor Sports] A driver who was lucky enough to hit the proper setup and is running away from the field.
  • Walkout Front [Synchro Swimming] A move in which the swimmer starts in the split position, lifts the front leg in a 180-degree arc over the surface to meet the other leg, and then continues into the back layout position.
  • Walkover [Horse Racing] Race which scratches down to only one starter who merely gallops required distance. A formal gesture required by rules of racing.
  • Wall [Soccer] A line of 2 to 6 defending players pressed together shoulder-to-shoulder to protect their goal against a close free kick; creates a more difficult shot by reducing the amount of open goal area the kicker has to shoot at.
  • Wall Magnet [Motor Sports] A car destined to become affixed to the outer retaining wall.
  • Wall Pass [Soccer] A pass by a ball carrier who sends the ball to a teammate, then runs behind his own defender and quickly receives a pass back; used to get a player past his defender without having to dribble by him; same as the "give-and-go" in basketball.
  • Waltz [Figure Skating] A simple jump, for beginners, in which takeoff is from the forward outside edge and the landing is on the back outside edge of the other foot, after a half revolution in the air.
  • Wand Shot [Archery] An archery contest were the target consists of a piece of peeled willow about 6 foot in length placed upright in the ground.
  • Wangdoodle [Poker] In private or home games, a hand or round in which the stakes are temporarily increased, usually after a "big" hand is shown down.
  • Wangdoodles [Poker] In private or home games, a hand or round in which the stakes are temporarily increased, usually after a "big" hand is shown down.
  • Wankan [Martial Arts] Name of a Karate Kata
  • War [Wrestling] Wrestle Association "R"
  • War Bow [Archery] A bow primarily used for use in war.
  • War Wagon [Motor Sports] Also known as pit wagons. Used as storage and to transport equipment and extra parts from the garage area to the pits where the will be needed for the race. Has become handy in a variety of other uses.
  • Warayang [Archery] An arrow with a broad triangular, barbed head used by the Javan gods.
  • Warbird™ Sole [Golf] Bi-concave sole deigned patented by Callaway™ Golf for use on their Big Bertha™ line of woods.
  • Warm Up [Bingo] A bingo game played before the start of a "session." But sometimes the Warm Up game is merely the first game of the session. Also Early Bird.
  • Warm Up Lane [Motor Sports] A paved lane, separate from the racing surface, that extends from the pit exit to some point further around the track. The idea is to give cars exiting the pits a separate area for coming up to speed, before they merge back in with the race traffic.
  • Warm-Up [Motor Sports] The laps taken on the track prior to the race used to warm up the tires, transmission, engine fluids and other components of the race car before the start of the event.
  • Warm-Up Area [Weight Lifting] An area adjoining the competition stage where athletes warm up before attempting their lifts.
  • Warm-Up Lap [Motor Sports] The lap before a race starts. Drivers use this parade lap to warm up their engines and tires.
  • Warming Up [Horse Racing] Galloping horse on way to post.
  • Warp [Blackjack] If the dealer bends the cards while checking under 10s and shuffles gently, the cards might take on warps that make them readable while face down. For more information on using warps, see Basic Blackjack.
  • Was Best [Golf] Held a consistent lead.
  • Was she Worth it [Bingo] 56
  • Wash [Poker] 1) Scramble (Thoroughly mix the deck while it is face-down on the table by spreading the cards over a large area, a move sometimes made by a dealer prior to actually shuffling the cards in traditional fashion. Sometimes this extra time taken mixing the cards is done at the request of a player.). 2) Less commonly, the term just means shuffle.
  • Wash Cards [Poker] Clean plastic cards, which are designed to be reusable, with special solvent.
  • Wash Out [Ice Hockey] A goal that is ruled invalid by the referee or the waving off of an infraction by the linesmen.
  • Washed Out [Horse Racing] A horse that becomes so nervous that it sweats profusely. Also known as "washy" or "lathered (up)."
  • Washi Te (De) [Martial Arts] The « hand of the eagle »
  • Washington Monument [Poker] Three 5s; so called because the Washington Monument is 555 feet high
  • Washout [Ice Hockey] 1. A goal that is disallowed for one of several reasons, such as the puck being kicked into the goal cage, or being batted in with a high stick, indicated by a signal from a linesman that is similar to baseball's "safe signal." 2. The same signal, indicating that no icing or offside violation is being called.
  • Washy [Horse Racing] Horse breaking out in nervous sweat before race, sometimes to the point it will be dripping from his belly.
  • Wasted! [Baseball] Noun, called by the fielders after a foul ball is hit. A foul ball that cannot be caught by a fielder, out of play and not worth chasing.
  • Watch [Sailing] (1) A division of crew into shifts. (2) The time each watch has duty.
  • Watchmacallits [Poker] The nuts (Best possible hand); usually preceded by the
  • Water Box [Motor Sports] In drag racing, the wet area before the staging lanes. The driver pulls through the water to wet the tires prior to a burnout.
  • Water Club [Golf] Obsolete club from around the 1880's to the 1930's that was designed for playing the ball from a water hazard.
  • Water Hazard [Golf] An area of water permanently on the course which is marked with stakes or oil lines.
  • Water Hole [Golf] A hole that has a large, conspicuous water hazard between the teeing ground and the putting green.
  • Water Jump [Equestrian Sports] An obstacle that requires a horse to jump over a wide expanse of water, usually preceded by a low hedge or fence.
  • Water Pump [Motor Sports] The pump that circulates coolant through the engine block, cylinder head and radiator. It is driven by the engine crankshaft.
  • Waterfall [General] A variation of a "Round the Clock" bet on three or more selections where money in hand is invested on to the next horse only, for example, (ABC) Ł1 win A "ATC" Ł1 win B, Ł1 win B "ATC" Ł1 win C, Ł1 win C "ATC" Ł1 win A.
  • Waterline [Sailing] The line where the water comes to on the hull of a boat. Design waterline is where the waterline was designed to be, load waterline is the waterline when the boat is loaded, and the painted waterline is where the waterline was painted. Actual waterline is where the waterline really is at any given time.
  • Waterline Length [Sailing] The length of the boat at the waterline.
  • Waterlogged [Sailing] Completely filled with water.
  • Waterway [Sailing] A river, canal or other body of water that boats can travel on.
  • Wave [Poker] 1) Put waving into cards (A method of marking cards in which the thief bends key cards around his finger such that the resultant waved cards can be identified in another player's hand or in the deck). 2) A slight bend in a card, for cheating purposes.
  • Wave Off [Skydiving] Prior to deployment a skydiver should make a clearly defined arm motion to indicate to others nearby that he is about to open his parachute. A good wave off is essential to the avoidance of deployment collisions.
  • Waved Cards [Poker] A method of marking cards in which the thief bends key cards around his finger such that the resultant waved cards can be identified in another player's hand or in the deck (when being dealt or for the purpose of cutting to a particular point in the deck). Bending cards is also called crimping, although that usually puts a more pronounced bend into cards than waving. Crimping often involves bending corners.
  • Waving [Poker] A method of marking cards in which the thief bends key cards around his finger such that the resultant waved cards can be identified in another player's hand or in the deck (when being dealt or for the purpose of cutting to a particular point in the deck). Bending cards is also called crimping, although that usually puts a more pronounced bend into cards than waving. Crimping often involves bending corners.
  • Wax [Skiing] A soft substance applied to the base of a ski for protection and to improve its snow-going properties. See glide wax; grip wax.
  • Wax Pocket [Skiing] The mid-section of stiffer cambered skis. See camber.
  • Waxable Skis [Skiing] Skis with bases that are waxed for grip and/or glide.
  • Waxless Skis [Skiing] Skis that have small ridge patterns on the middle area of the base to provide grip; used in classical cross country.
  • Way [Sailing] The progress of a boat. If a boat is moving it is considered to be "making way."
  • Way Bet [Keno] Combination of Groups, bet upon by a Player.
  • Way Ticket [Keno] A ticket that groups different numbers to create more than one way to win.
  • Waza [Martial Arts] Technique.
  • Waza Ari Awasete Ippon [Martial Arts] A win in which the combatant has scored two waza-aris. (Judo)
  • Waza-Ari [Martial Arts] A half win. Two waza-ari are equivalent to an ippon. (Judo and karate)
  • Wba [General] World Boxing Association.
  • Wbc [General] World Boxing Council.
  • Wc [Motor Sports] The common Internet acronym for Winston Cup, NASCAR's top series, and arguably the single most successful sports league or series in all of professional sports today. Winston Cup cars are highly developed Stock cars, and are relatively heavy and overpowered for their suspension and tires.
  • Wccw [Wrestling] World Class Championship Wrestling
  • Wcuc [General] World Cricket Umpiring Conference.
  • Wcw [General] World Championship Wrestling.
  • Wcwa [Wrestling] West Coast Wrestling Alliance
  • Wcwo [Wrestling] Wild Championship Wrestling Outlaws
  • Wd [Greyhound Racing] Wheeling Downs
  • Wdi [Skydiving] Wind drift indicator used at some dropzones. A paper streamer thrown from the jump plane to estimate winds.
  • We Got! [Baseball] Outs earned by the fielding side, usually yelled by the catcher to the fielders, as in "One we got!" or "Two we got!"
  • Weak [Poker] 1) A style of play characterized by a readiness to fold and a reluctance to raise. 2) Weak is also used to generally describe a poor player or a table that's easy to beat.
  • Weak Hand [Poker] A hand with low probability of winning a given pot.
  • Weak Player [Poker] One who plays timidly or no aggressively, and probably loses for that reason.
  • Weak Side [Water Polo] The side of the pool opposite the side on which the ball is located.
  • Weak-Passive [Poker] Describing a player who calls a lot and rarely raises, or the play of such a player.
  • Weakened [Horse Racing] A horse which started off well in a race and was in a position from which it could win, but could not keep up that pace or keep up with the pace of the other runners and dropped back in the field. That horse is said to have weakened.
  • Weaki Weaki [Craps] "Hawaiian" for when the roll doesn't hit the backboard. Dealers advised the shooter to "throw the dice like your ex was standing at the far end of the table".
  • Weakside [Rugby] The short side of a field on a ruck or maul. Also called the blindside.
  • Weanling [Horse Racing] A thoroughbred after being weaned and until he becomes a yearling on the New Year's Day following his foaling.
  • Wear and Use [Motor Sports] Normal depreciation of a vehicle under average daily use.
  • Weather Helm [Sailing] The tendency of a boat to head up toward the eye of the wind. The opposite of lee helm.
  • Weaving [Motor Sports] Zig zagging across the track to warm up and clean off tires, or to confuse an opponent while attempting a pass.
  • Wedge [Motor Sports] Also known as cross weight. The balance of the weight on each corner of a race car adjusted diagonally (Example: Left rear to right front). By taking out (lowering) the wedge - understeer or push can be alleviated. By increasing the wedge setting the car can be tightened, helping to alleviate a loose condition. This can be done can during a pit stop to make a quick chassis adjustment. It is accomplished by turning a bolt, attached to the top of the rear springs. Turning it in or out 360 degrees (Round of Wedge) or any varying amount depending on the condition and its severity.
  • Wedge, Round of [Motor Sports] Adjusting the handling of the car by altering pressure on the rear springs.
  • Wedges [Poker] A deck marked by shaving the long edges of some cards such that they are wider towards their ends, so that a thief can tell by feel the values of certain cards, usually certain high or low cards, such as the aces, or pull those cards by feel from the deck.
  • Wedgie [Golf] Something special given from one person to another by pulling one's underwear snuggly up into the anal crevice. -Top
  • Weed [Poker] Reclaim money from a shill who is winning.
  • Weeds [Poker] The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds. For example, in a high draw game, you raised before the draw with three aces. Among the several callers, the first man took three cards and passed after the draw. Everyone else passed. You did not improve your hand, but three aces is worth a bet after the draw, so you bet. The three-card draw now raises. The others fold. You call. He shows his full house. He was waiting in the weeds. Also, bushes, as part of the terms in the bushes and lying in the bushes, and woods, as part of the terms in the woods and waiting in the woods.
  • Weenie Gear [Cycling] Same as granny gear.
  • Weigh [Sailing] To raise, as in to weigh anchor.
  • Weigh in [Horse Racing] At a horse racetrack, the procedure where the clerk of scales, prior to the race, checks the weights of the jockeys and their riding equipment against the officially assigned weight for each horse in the race. At a greyhound racetrack, the procedure where the clerk of scales checks of the weight of greyhounds as they enter the lock out kennel before a race performance.
  • Weigh in (Out) [Horse Racing] The certification, by the clerk of scales, of a rider's weight before (after) a race. A jockey weighs in fully dressed with all equipment except for his/her helmet, whip and (in many jurisdictions) flak jacket.
  • Weigh Out [Horse Racing] The procedure where the clerk of scales, after the race, checks the weights of jockeys and their riding equipment against the officially assigned weight for each horse in the race. At a greyhound racetrack, the procedure where the clerk of scales checks of the weight of greyhounds as they leave the lock out kennel to enter the racetrack for a race.
  • Weigh-in [Greyhound Racing] After each race, jockeys, their saddles and any additional weight they needed to carry are weighed in to ensure they complied with the set handicap.
  • Weight [Horse Racing] How much weight a horse carries in a race is partly determined by its age and sex. Two and 3-year-olds carry less weight than older horses, and females carry less weight than males. These reductions or "allowances" are determined by a scale of weights that change depending on the time of year.
  • Weight Allowance [Horse Racing] Weight permitted to be reduced because of the conditions of the race, such as a sex allowance or an apprentice allowance.
  • Weight Class [Wrestling] Groupings determined by weight; the wrestler must be exactly on or below the specified weight to qualify for the weight class.
  • Weight for Age [Greyhound Racing] A class of race where weights are allocated on a set scale according to the age and the sex of the horses.

X

  • X [Sailing] A mark on a pirate's treasure chart that is supposed to indicate where the treasure is.
  • X Marks the Spot [Poker] A variant of Southern Cross, played only in home games, in which each player is dealt five cards face down, and five cards are dealt face down in the center, in the form of a cross, forming three vertical and three horizontal cards, with each player allowed to combine any of the widow cards together with his original cards in forming a five-card hand. The widow cards are turned up one at a time, with the center card turned up last, each followed by a betting round. The center card and others of the same rank are wild. Also called criss-cross.
  • X-C [Skiing] An abbreviation of cross-country skiing.
  • X-Car [Motor Sports] An experimental car.
  • X-Out [Golf] General term given to less than perfect balls. Usually top grade balls with a slight cosmetic or manufacturing defect, X-outs are identified by a row of “X’s” somewhere on the cover. X-outs are substantially less costly than first-quality balls.
  • Xba [Baseball] Extra Base Hits Allowed
  • Xbh [Baseball] Extra Base Hits
  • Xcd [Skiing] An abbreviation of cross-country (X-C) downhill, to distinguish it from other forms of downhill skiing.
  • Xeroradiography [Horse Racing] A costly type of x-ray procedure using specially sensitized screens that give higher resolution on the edges of bone and better visualization of soft tissue structures.
  • Xi (Chinese) [Martial Arts] Breath
  • Xin [Martial Arts] (Chinese) Also written Hsin. Means Heart, but the word is also used for Knowledge, Consciousness, Representation and Thoughts.
  • Xis [General] The price of 6-1.
  • Xse [Wrestling] Xtreme Sports Entertainment

Y

  • Ya [Archery] An arrow case, Japan.
  • Ya Bane [Archery] The feathers of an arrow, Japan.
  • Ya Bumi [Archery] A letter attached to an arrow to be shot, Japan.
  • Ya Dane [Archery] A supply of arrows in a quiver, Japan.
  • Ya Done [Archery] Projecting flanges on the checks of a menpo (face guard) to stop arrows.
  • Ya Gakari, Yagoro [Archery] A bowshot, Japan.
  • Ya Haki [Archery] A fletcher of arrows, Japan.
  • Ya Hazu, Ya Haru [Archery] The nock of an arrow, Japan.
  • Ya Jiri [Archery] The head of an arrow, Japan.
  • Ya no Ha [Archery] The feathers of an arrow, Japan.
  • Ya Omote [Archery] A bow shot, Japan.
  • Ya Saki [Archery] The point of an arrow, Japan.
  • Ya Tsugi [Archery] Fixing an arrow to a bow, Japan.
  • Ya Zama [Archery] An embrasure form which to shoot with a bow, Japan.
  • Ya Zuka [Archery] A bundle of arrows, Japan.
  • Ya Zutsu [Archery] See ebira.
  • Yaba [Archery] A place for practicing archery, Japan.
  • Yabusame [Martial Arts] (Japanese) Very ancient Martial Art consisting of gallopping a horse and shoot with a bow on predefined targets along the distance covered. Nowadays it is a Japanese sport called Kyű-Jutsu.
  • Yabusuma [Archery] A volley of arrows, Japan.
  • Yacht [Sailing] A sailboat or powerboat used for pleasure, not a working boat.
  • Yadzutsu, Utsubo [Archery] An arrow case consisting of a long bow with a short cover on one side near the end, Japan.
  • Yag [Archery] A Turkish bow.
  • Yagara [Archery] The shaft of an arrow usually made of reed, Japan.
  • Yakker [Baseball] Curve ball.
  • Yama Gata [Archery] A mound behind a target to stop arrows, Japan.
  • Yama Zuki [Martial Arts] « mountain » punch
  • Yame [Martial Arts] Stop; a command.
  • Yanagi Ha, Yanagi Ba [Archery] A type of Japanese arrow, usually straight sided and of diamond section but varying in size and shape.
  • Yanagi, Yanagi to Ba [Archery] A type of open quiver, Japan.
  • Yang [Martial Arts] "Active" or "positive." In ying-yang theory, the positive aspect associated with what is described as centrifugal, expansive and extroversive.
  • Yank the Shot [Bowling] To hold onto the ball too long, thus pulling it across the body before release.
  • Yankee [General] 4 selections, 11 bets - 6 doubles, 4 trebles, 1 accumulator
  • Yano [Archery] The shaft of an arrow, Japan.
  • Yano-Ne [Archery] A spar attached to the mast and used to hoist square sails.
  • Yard Arm [Sailing] The end of a yard.
  • Yardage Rating [Golf] An evaluation of the playing difficulty of a hole based solely on the distance from tee to green.
  • Yari [Martial Arts] Spear.
  • Yaw [Sailing] Swinging off course, usually in heavy seas. The bow moves toward one side of the intended course. Also see rolling and pitching.
  • Yawl [Sailing] A two masted sailboat with the shorter mizzen mast placed aft of the rudder post. A ketch is similar, but the mizzen mast is forward of the rudder post.
  • Yaz [Baseball] Yes, Carl Yastrzemski attended Notre Dame in the 1957-58 academic year (see p. 59) and would have been on the varsity as a sophomore if he had not signed a six-figure pro contract with the Boston Red Sox. "Yaz" continued to attend classes at Notre Dame and graduated from Merrimack College.
  • Year (Year) [Baseball] When the stats were recorded.
  • Yearling [Horse Racing] A horse in its second calendar year of life, beginning Jan. 1st of the year following its birth in Northern hemisphere and August 1st on southern hemisphere..
  • Yeast [Poker] Raise. "Let's give it a little yeast" means "I raise."
  • Yellow Card [Field Hockey] An intentional foul, such as rough play or a high stick, is penalized by suspending the player from the game for five minutes or longer. The penalty is signaled with a yellow card presented by the referee. The team plays short-handed, as in ice hockey, for the suspension period.
  • Yellow Flag [Motor Sports] Flag used to slow down the racers in the case of a crash, debris on the course (like car parts), slick fluids on the track or the weather has become a factor with rain. During a yellow flag the pace car, with the top lights flashing, joins up with the race leader and sets a slower speed on the track. This is done to preserve the driving order on the track as cars cannot pass one another under a yellow after crossing the start/finish line. Drivers generally use this time to pit for refueling, new tires and adjustments.
  • Yellow Light [Motor Sports] Caution on the speedway. Maintain position; no passing.
  • Yellow Stripe [Motor Sports] In many oval track series, a rookie driver is required to put yellow strips of tape on rear of their car.
  • Yellowtail [Motor Sports] A rookie NASCAR driver, so called because cars driven by rookies have yellow rear bumpers.
  • Yielding [Horse Racing] Condition of a turf course with a great deal of moisture. Horses sink into it noticeably.
  • Yikwon [Martial Arts] Backfist.
  • Yin [Martial Arts] "Passive" or "negative." One of the fundamental metaphysical elements of yin-yang whose balance is believed to be the center of existence.
  • Yip [Golf] To mishit a putt due to an attack of yips.
  • Yips [Golf] A severe case of nerves resulting in convulsive shakes that make it very difficult for a player to putt accurately.
  • Ymmv [Blackjack] The acronym for Your Mileage May Vary.
  • Yo [Poker] 11, in respect to the size of a bet. Probably comes from craps dealers who pronounce the word clearly, loudly, and distinctly to distinguish amid all the casino noise from the similar sounding seven. Often they drag it out to eeyoleven, and this is sometimes shortened to eeyo.
  • Yo Eleven [Craps] Betting that the next roll will be the total sum of 11 (5&6).
  • Yo Kyu [Archery] A small bow used for amusement, Japan.
  • Yo, Elevine. Lost her Draws in the Men's Latrine [Craps] Eleven.
  • Yodan [Martial Arts] Fourth-degree black belt.
  • Yoi [Martial Arts] Ready, be ready !
  • Yoi Dachi [Martial Arts] Ready posture
  • Yojimbo [Martial Arts] "Bodyguard." The name given to a masterless samurai (ronin) who hired themselves out as professional bodyguards.
  • Yok Sudo [Martial Arts] Ridge hand.
  • Yoko [Martial Arts] Side" or "lateral.
  • Yoko Aruki [Martial Arts] One of the unique ninja walking techniques to move stealthily through woods or narrow areas.
  • Yoko Enpi Mawashi Uchi [Martial Arts] Circular side elbow strike
  • Yoko Enpi Uchi [Martial Arts] Side elbow strike
  • Yoko Geri [Martial Arts] Side kick
  • Yoko Geri Keage [Martial Arts] Side snap kick
  • Yoko Geri Kekomi [Martial Arts] Side thrust kick
  • Yoleven [Poker] 11, in respect to the size of a bet. Probably comes from craps dealers who pronounce the word clearly, loudly, and distinctly to distinguish amid all the casino noise from the similar sounding seven. Often they drag it out to eeyoleven, and this is sometimes shortened to eeyo. Also, yo.
  • Yonhon Nukite [Martial Arts] Four-finger spear hand
  • Yonsok [Martial Arts] Combination.
  • Yoppiki [Archery] To draw an arrow to the head, Japan.
  • Yori Ashi [Martial Arts] Glissade, glide of both feet
  • You Roll Two [Poker] A form of seven-card stud, found exclusively in home games, in which each player receives four cards face down, turns any two up, and then the betting commences.
  • You Win Some, you Lose Some Rule [Wrestling] If a title change at a house show is not taped by a production crew, it never happened.
  • Young and Keen [Bingo] 15
  • Younger Hand [Poker] An obsolete term for any player to the left of the eldest hand (that is, the one immediately to the left of the dealer).
  • Youngest Hand [Poker] An obsolete term for the player immediately to the right of the dealer.
  • Ypw [Wrestling] Yankee Pro Wrestling
  • Yr [Baseball] Year
  • Yu [Greyhound Racing] Yuma, Arizona
  • Yu Gake [Archery] A Japanese archer's glove.
  • Yu Gote, Yu Kote [Archery] Japanese archer's sleeves.
  • Yubi [Martial Arts] Finger.
  • Yubukuro [Archery] A bag or case for a bow, Japan.
  • Yudansha [Martial Arts] One who holds a first degree black belt or higher.
  • Yuko [Martial Arts] A near waza-ari. However, yukos cannot be accumulated to make a higher score. (Judo)
  • Yumi [Archery] A bow, Japan.
  • Yumi Bukuro [Archery] A bag for a bow, Japan.
  • Yumi Dame [Archery] A form used to give a bow it's permanent curves, Japan.
  • Yumi Gote, Igote [Archery] See Yu gote.
  • Yumi Gumi [Archery] A company of archers, Japan.
  • Yumi Mato [Archery] A target for archery, Japan.
  • Yumi no Tsura [Archery] A bow string, Japan.
  • Yumi Shi [Archery] A bowyer, Japan.
  • Yumi Yari [Archery] A spear head to fit the tip of a bow, Japan.
  • Yumi Zira [Archery] A bow string, Japan.
  • Yumitori [Archery] An archer, Japan.
  • Yunde [Archery] The left hand of an archer, Japan.
  • Yurchenko [Gymnastics] A mount for the vault, consisting of a roundoff onto the springboard, then a flic-flac onto the vault, followed by a back flip dismount. Named for Soviet gymnast Natalia Yurchenko, who created it.
  • Yusei Gachi [Martial Arts] A win by superiority. (Judo)
  • Yuzuka [Archery] The handle of a Japanese bow.
  • Yuzura [Archery] A bow string, Japan.

Z

  • Z-Car [Motor Sports] Datsun/Nissan model of cars.
  • Z-Game [Poker] The smallest game in a card room or casino. Opposite of A-game.
  • Z.P. [Skydiving] Zero-porosity. Common slang for a type of fabric relatively impermeable to air. The less air that flows through the fabric wing of a ram air parachute, the more efficiently it flies.
  • Zamboni [Ice Hockey] The machine used to clean and resurface the ice between periods.
  • Zan [Archery] A bracer from Ghana, made from the tail of a squirrel.
  • Zantac [Horse Racing] Trade name for the drug ranitidine, a medication used to treat ulcers.
  • Zazen [Martial Arts] "Sitting meditation." The meditative posture and exercise of the Zen school.
  • Zebra Stripes [Motor Sports] Another term for rookie stripes, the black-and-white stripes on the back of a rookie's car, much like a Student Driver sign, so that approaching drivers are fairly warned.
  • Zen [Martial Arts] The discipline of enlightenment related to the Buddhist doctrine that emphasizes meditation, discipline, and the direct transmition of teachings from master to student.
  • Zen Count [Blackjack] A level two counting system described by Arnold Snyder in his book, Blackbelt in Blackjack. It assigns a value of plus one to the 2s, 3s and 7s, plus two to the 4s, 5s and 6s, minus one to the Aces and minus two to the ten valued cards.
  • Zen Kutsu Dachi [Martial Arts] Forward stance
  • Zenith [Sailing] The point of the celestial sphere which is directly overhead.
  • Zenshin [Martial Arts] The entire human body.
  • Zephyr [Sailing] A gentle breeze. The west wind.
  • Zero [Roulette] Number on the wheel. Green in color. Can be wagered the same way as numbers 1-36.
  • Zero in [Bowling] To find the path to the pocket, usually after some poor hits and/or experimentation.
  • Zero Porosity [Skydiving] Means Non-porous to air. (Not technically the correct term, but it's the one Skydivers use). Air does not go through it making ZP Canopies very efficient wings
  • Zhoo [Archery] A bow, Western Tibet.
  • Zhou-Jia [Martial Arts] (Chinese) Shaolin method of fighting of the Quan-Fa. Sometimes called Hong-Chay, this school was created from Master Long Zhou (1890-1919).
  • Zig Zag [Motor Sports] To sharply move back-and-forth on the track. Drivers often zig zag on warm-up laps to heat up their tires.
  • Zilch [Video Poker] Nothing. A dealt hand with no cards worth holding (i.e., you should redraw all five cards) or a final hand with no payoff.
  • Zillion [Golf] That last hole was a bad one, I shot a ZILLION!
  • Zinc Iron Heads [Golf] Iron heads die cast from an alloy of zinc. These heads typically are considered less expensive and less durable than their stainless counterparts and thus are designated primarily for beginner sets. Zinc heads can be identified by their non-magnetic properties as well as by their typically larger diameter than normal hosels.
  • Zinger [Croquet] A tea made with red zinger (Hibiscus flowers, rosehips, lemon grass, orange peel, natural flavors, and citric acid) which when laced with Vodka or Everclear will affect your opponents play, thereby giving you a decided edge to being able to win. This can also be done with specialty coffees, etc. A tactic not recommended for polite play.
  • Zip [Poker] In lowball, 4-3-2-A; always preceded by the rank of the highest card in the hand. For example, 8-zip is 8-4-3-2-A. Also, -nothing.
  • Zolnowski [Baseball] RHP Ray Zolnowski is the final player on Notre Dame baseball's list of 792 all-time letterwinners. The 800th letterwinner likely will play in 2001 or 2002.
  • Zombie [Poker] A poker player with no tells, one who has a poker face, shows no emotion, and otherwise exhibits no behavior to give away his holdings.
  • Zone [Soccer] A type of defense that assigns each defender to a particular area in front of or around his team's goal in which he is responsible for marking any attacker that enters; often used in youth league games but rarely in professional competition.
  • Zone Defense [Basketball] A defense in which each player is responsible for a specific area of the court and must guard any offensive player who enters that area. Illegal in the National Basketball Association.
  • Zone Rating [Baseball] Simply the percentage of balls fielded by a player in his typical defensive "zone," as measured by STATS reporters.
  • Zone Rtg [Baseball] Zone Rating (see Definitions)
  • Zones [Ice Hockey] Three areas made up by the two blue lines; the attacking zone is the area farthest from the goal a player is defending; the neutral zone is the central area; the defending zone is the area where a player’s goal is (the goal where his team’s goalie is stationed)
  • Zoomie [Golf] A drive that goes further than most drives ever hit by the golfer who smacked it.
  • Zuboshi [Archery] The black spot in the centre of a target, Japan.
  • Zudnik [Freestyle Skating] A trick in which the skier bends both the upper and lower body forward at the waist, toward each other.
  • Zuke [Poker] Toke (Gambling term for "tip", as in "Toke the cocktail waitress". Comes from the term "Token of appreciation". A small amount of money (typically $.50 or $1.00) is given to the dealer by the winner of a pot. Quite often, tokes represent the great majority of a dealer's income.). This term is generally used only by dealers.
  • Zuki [Martial Arts] Direct attack of the fist
  • Zulu [Sailing] Used to indicated times measured in Coordinated Universal Time, a successor to Greenwich Mean Time. A time standard that is not affected by time zones or seasons.
  • Zyhgyr [Archery] Persian for the thumb ring used by eastern Europeans and Islamic archers.
  • Zylin [Golf] A proprietary cover material developed by Spalding that is claimed to produce feel and durability.